VS.

Cog vs. Sprocket

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Cognoun

A tooth on a gear.

Sprocketnoun

A toothed wheel that enmeshes with a chain or other perforated band.

Cognoun

A gear; a cogwheel.

Sprocketnoun

The tooth of such a wheel.

Cognoun

An unimportant individual in a greater system.

Sprocketnoun

(architecture) A flared extension at the base of a sloped roof.

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Cognoun

(carpentry) A projection or tenon at the end of a beam designed to fit into a matching opening of another piece of wood to form a joint.

Sprocketnoun

A placeholder name for an unnamed, unspecified, or hypothetical manufactured good or product.

‘Suppose we have a widget factory that produces 100 widgets per year, and a sprocket factory that produces 200 sprockets per year.’;

Cognoun

(mining) One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.

Sprocketnoun

A tooth or projection, as on the periphery of a wheel, shaped so as to engage with a chain.

Cognoun

(historical) A ship of burden, or war with a round, bulky hull.

Sprocketnoun

roller that has teeth on the rims to pull film or paper through

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Cognoun

A trick or deception; a falsehood.

Sprocketnoun

thin wheel with teeth that engage with a chain

Cognoun

A small fishing boat.

Sprocketnoun

tooth on the rim of gear wheel

Cogverb

To furnish with a cog or cogs.

Sprocket

A sprocket, sprocket-wheel or chainwheel is a profiled wheel with teeth that mesh with a chain, track or other perforated or indented material. The name 'sprocket' applies generally to any wheel upon which radial projections engage a chain passing over it.

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Cogverb

To load (a die) so that it can be used to cheat.

Cogverb

To cheat; to play or gamble fraudulently.

Cogverb

To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.

Cogverb

To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; to palm off.

‘to cog in a word’;

Cogverb

To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.

‘I'll . . . cog their hearts from them.’;

Cogverb

To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; as, to cog in a word; to palm off.

‘Fustian tragedies . . . have, by concerted applauses, been cogged upon the town for masterpieces.’; ‘To cog a die, to load so as to direct its fall; to cheat in playing dice.’;

Cogverb

To deceive; to cheat; to play false; to lie; to wheedle; to cajole.

‘For guineas in other men's breeches,Your gamesters will palm and will cog.’;

Cogverb

To furnish with a cog or cogs.

Cognoun

A trick or deception; a falsehood.

Cognoun

A tooth, cam, or catch for imparting or receiving motion, as on a gear wheel, or a lifter or wiper on a shaft; originally, a separate piece of wood set in a mortise in the face of a wheel.

Cognoun

A kind of tenon on the end of a joist, received into a notch in a bearing timber, and resting flush with its upper surface.

Cognoun

One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.

Cognoun

A small fishing boat.

Cognoun

tooth on the rim of gear wheel

Cogverb

roll steel ingots

Cogverb

join pieces of wood with cogs

Cognoun

a wheel or bar with a series of projections on its edge, which transfers motion by engaging with projections on another wheel or bar

‘the cogs and springs of a watch’;

Cognoun

each of the projections on a cog

‘applewood was the favourite material for the cogs or teeth of a cogwheel’;

Cognoun

a broadly built medieval ship with a rounded prow and stern.

Cogverb

copy (someone else's work) illicitly or without acknowledgement

‘he's away cogging his homework from Aggie's wee girl’;

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