VS.

Brink vs. Edge

Published:

Brinknoun

The edge, margin, or border of a steep place, as of a precipice; a bank or edge.

‘the brink of a river’;

Edgenoun

The boundary line of a surface.

Brinknoun

(figurative) The edge or border

‘the brink of success’; ‘He's on the brink of madness.’;

Edgenoun

(geometry) A one-dimensional face of a polytope. In particular, the joining line between two vertices of a polygon; the place where two faces of a polyhedron meet.

Brinknoun

The edge, margin, or border of a steep place, as of a precipice; a bank or edge, as of a river or pit; a verge; a border; as, the brink of a chasm. Also Fig.

‘The plashy brink of weedy lake.’;

Edgenoun

An advantage.

‘I have the edge on him.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Brinknoun

a region marking a boundary

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe; that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.

Brinknoun

the edge of a steep place

Edgenoun

A sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; an extreme verge.

‘The cup is right on the edge of the table.’; ‘He is standing on the edge of a precipice.’;

Brinknoun

the limit beyond which something happens or changes;

‘on the verge of tears’; ‘on the brink of bankruptcy’;

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

ADVERTISEMENT

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part (of a period of time)

‘in the edge of evening’;

Edgenoun

(cricket) A shot where the ball comes off the edge of the bat, often unintentionally.

Edgenoun

(graph theory) A connected pair of vertices in a graph.

Edgenoun

In male masturbation, a level of sexual arousal that is maintained just short of reaching the point of inevitability, or climax; see also edging.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To move an object slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged the book across the table.’;

Edgeverb

(intransitive) To move slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged away from her.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Edgeverb

(usually in the form 'just edge') To win by a small margin.

Edgeverb

To hit the ball with an edge of the bat, causing a fine deflection.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To trim the margin of a lawn where the grass meets the sidewalk, usually with an electric or gas-powered lawn edger.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To furnish with an edge; to construct an edging.

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge, as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

Edgeverb

(figurative) To make sharp or keen; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

Edgeverb

To delay one's orgasm so as to remain almost at the point of orgasm.

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument; as, the edge of an ax, knife, sword, or scythe.

‘He which hath the sharp sword with two edges.’; ‘Slander,Whose edge is sharper than the sword.’;

Edgenoun

Any sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; extreme verge; as, the edge of a table, a precipice.

‘Upon the edge of yonder coppice.’; ‘In worst extremes, and on the perilous edgeOf battle.’; ‘Pursue even to the very edge of destruction.’;

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

‘The full edge of our indignation.’; ‘Death and persecution lose all the ill that they can have, if we do not set an edge upon them by our fears and by our vices.’;

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening.

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

‘To edge her champion's sword.’;

Edgeverb

To shape or dress the edge of, as with a tool.

Edgeverb

To furnish with a fringe or border; as, to edge a dress; to edge a garden with box.

‘Hills whose tops were edged with groves.’;

Edgeverb

To make sharp or keen, figuratively; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

‘By such reasonings, the simple were blinded, and the malicious edged.’;

Edgeverb

To move by little and little or cautiously, as by pressing forward edgewise; as, edging their chairs forwards.

Edgeverb

To move sideways; to move gradually; as, edge along this way.

Edgeverb

To sail close to the wind.

‘I must edge up on a point of wind.’;

Edgenoun

the boundary of a surface

Edgenoun

a sharp side formed by the intersection of two surfaces of an object;

‘he rounded the edges of the box’;

Edgenoun

a line determining the limits of an area

Edgenoun

the attribute of urgency;

‘his voice had an edge to it’;

Edgenoun

a slight competitive advantage;

‘he had an edge on the competition’;

Edgenoun

a strip near the boundary of an object;

‘he jotted a note on the margin of the page’;

Edgeverb

advance slowly, as if by inches;

‘He edged towards the car’;

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge;

‘edge the tablecloth with embroidery’;

Edgeverb

lie adjacent to another or share a boundary;

‘Canada adjoins the U.S.’; ‘England marches with Scotland’;

Edgeverb

provide with an edge;

‘edge a blade’;

Edgenoun

the outside limit of an object, area, or surface

‘she perched on the edge of a desk’; ‘a willow tree at the water's edge’;

Edgenoun

an area next to a steep drop

‘the cliff edge’;

Edgenoun

the point immediately before something unpleasant or momentous occurs

‘the economy was teetering on the edge of recession’;

Edgenoun

the sharpened side of the blade of a cutting implement or weapon

‘a knife with a razor-sharp edge’;

Edgenoun

the line along which two surfaces of a solid meet.

Edgenoun

an intense, sharp, or striking quality

‘a flamenco singer brings a primitive edge to the music’; ‘there was an edge of menace in his voice’;

Edgenoun

a quality or factor which gives superiority over close rivals

‘his cars have the edge over his rivals'’;

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge

‘the pool is edged with paving’;

Edgeverb

move or cause to move gradually or furtively in a particular direction

‘Hazel quietly edged him away from the others’; ‘she tried to edge away from him’;

Edgeverb

give an intense or sharp quality to

‘the bitterness that edged her voice’;

Edgeverb

strike (the ball) with the edge of the bat; strike a ball delivered by (the bowler) with the edge of the bat

‘Haynes edged to slip’; ‘he edged a ball into his pad’;

Edgeverb

ski with one's weight on the edges of one's skis

‘you will be edging early, controlling a parallel turn’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons