VS.

Bacon vs. Ham

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Main Difference

The main difference between Bacon and Ham is that the Bacon is a cured meat from a pig and Ham is a processed pork foodstuff.

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Wikipedia
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  • Bacon (noun)

    Cured meat from the sides, belly{{,}} or back of a pig.

  • Bacon (noun)

    Thin slices of the above in long strips.

  • Bacon (noun)

    The police.

    "Run! It's the bacon!"

  • Bacon (noun)

    Road rash.

  • Ham (noun)

    The region back of the knee joint; the popliteal space; the hock.

  • Ham (noun)

    A thigh and buttock of an animal slaughtered for meat.

  • Ham (noun)

    Meat from the thigh of a hog cured for food.

    "a little piece of ham for the cat"

  • Ham (noun)

    The back of the thigh.

  • Ham (noun)

    Electronic mail that is wanted; mail that is not spam or junk mail.

    "spam"

  • Ham (noun)

    obsolete form of home

  • Ham (noun)

    an overacting or amateurish performer; an actor with an especially showy or exaggerated style

    "hambone|hamfatter|overactor|tear-cat"

  • Ham (noun)

    an amateur radio operator

    "radio amateur"

  • Ham (verb)

    To overact; to act with exaggerated emotions.

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
  • Bacon (noun)

    The back and sides of a pig salted and smoked; formerly, the flesh of a pig salted or fresh.

  • Bacon

    Roger Bacon. A celebrated English philosopher of the thirteenth century. Born at or near Ilchester, Somersetshire, about 1214: died probably at Oxford in 1294. He is credited with a recognition of the importance of experiment in answering questions about the natural world, recognized the potential importance of gunpowder and explosives generally, and wrote comments about several of the physical sciences that anticipated facts proven by experiment only much later.

  • Bacon

    Francis Bacon. A celebrated English philosopher, jurist, and statesman, son of Sir Nicholas Bacon. Born at York House, London, Jan. 22, 1561: died at Highgate, April 9, 1626, created Baron Verulam July 12, 1618, and Viscount St. Albans Jan. 27, 1621: commonly, but incorrectly, called Lord Bacon. He studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, April, 1573, to March, 1575, and at Gray's Inn 1575; became attached to the embassy of Sir Amias Paulet in France in 1576; was admitted to the bar in 1582; entered Parliament in 1584; was knighted in 1603; became solicitor-general in 1607, and attorney-general in 1613; was made a privy councilor in 1616, lord keeper in 1617, and lord chancellor in 1618; and was tried in 1621 for bribery, condemned, fined, and removed from office. A notable incident of his career was his connection with the Earl of Essex, which began in July, 1591, remained an intimate friendship until the fall of Essex (1600-01), and ended in Bacon's active efforts to secure the conviction of the earl for treason. (See Essex.) His great fame rests upon his services as a reformer of the methods of scientific investigation; and though his relation to the progress of knowledge has been exaggerated and misunderstood, his reputation as one of the chief founders of modern inductive science is well grounded. His chief works are the "Advancement of Learning," published in English as "The Two Books of Francis Bacon of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning Divine and Human," in 1605; the "Novum organum sive indicia vera de interpretatione naturae," published in Latin, 1620, as a "second part" of the (incomplete) "Instauratio magna"; the "De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum," published in Latin in 1623; "Historia Ventorum" (1622), "Historia Vitae et Mortis" (1623), "Historia Densi et Rari" (posthumously, 1658), "Sylva Sylvarum" (posthumously, 1627), "New Atlantis," "Essays" (1597, 1612, 1625), "De Sapientia Veterum" (1609), "Apothegms New and Old," "History of Henry VII." (1622). Works edited by Ellis, Spedding, and Heath (7 vols. 1857); Life by Spedding (7 vols. 1861, 2 vols. 1878). See Shakspere.

  • Ham (noun)

    Home.

  • Ham (noun)

    The region back of the knee joint; the popliteal space; the hock.

  • Ham (noun)

    The thigh of any animal; especially, the thigh of a hog cured by salting and smoking.

  • Ham (noun)

    a person who performs in a showy or exaggerated style; - used especially of actors. Also used attributively, as, a ham actor.

  • Ham (noun)

    The licensed operator of an amateur radio station.

  • Ham (verb)

    To act with exaggerated voice and gestures; to overact.

Webster Dictionary
  • Bacon (noun)

    back and sides of a hog salted and dried or smoked; usually sliced thin and fried

  • Bacon (noun)

    English scientist and Franciscan monk who stressed the importance of experimentation; first showed that air is required for combustion and first used lenses to correct vision (1220-1292)

  • Bacon (noun)

    English statesman and philosopher; precursor of British empiricism; advocated inductive reasoning (1561-1626)

  • Ham (noun)

    meat cut from the thigh of a hog (usually smoked)

  • Ham (noun)

    (Old Testament) son of Noah

  • Ham (noun)

    a licensed amateur radio operator

  • Ham (noun)

    an unskilled actor who overacts

  • Ham (verb)

    exaggerate one's acting

Princeton's WordNet

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Ham Illustrations

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