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Aphagia vs. Aphasia

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Aphagianoun

(medicine) The condition of difficulty in swallowing.

Aphasianoun

(pathology) A partial or total loss of language skills due to brain damage. Usually, damage to the left perisylvian region, including Broca's area and Wernicke's area, causes aphasia.

Aphagianoun

loss of the ability to swallow

Aphasianoun

Loss of the power of speech, or of the appropriate use of words, the vocal organs remaining intact, and the intelligence being preserved. It is dependent on injury or disease of the brain.

Aphagianoun

Medicine. Inability to swallow.

Aphasianoun

inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion

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Aphagianoun

Chiefly Physiology. Inability, failure, or refusal to eat; absence or loss of the desire or need to eat; an instance of this.

Aphasianoun

inability (or impaired ability) to understand or produce speech, as a result of brain damage.

Aphagia

Aphagia is the inability or refusal to swallow. The word is derived from the Ancient Greek prefix α, meaning or and the suffix φαγία, derived from the verb φαγεῖν, meaning It is related to dysphagia which is difficulty swallowing (Greek prefix δυσ, dys, meaning difficult, or defective), and odynophagia, painful swallowing (from ὀδύνη, odyn(o), meaning ).

‘not’; ‘without,’; ‘to eat.’; ‘pain’;

Aphasia

Aphasia is an inability to comprehend or formulate language because of damage to specific brain regions. The major causes are a cerebral vascular accident (stroke) or head trauma.

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