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Worm vs. Insect

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Wormnoun

A generally tubular invertebrate of the annelid phylum; an earthworm.

Insectnoun

An arthropod in the class Insecta, characterized by six legs, up to four wings, and a chitinous exoskeleton.

‘Our shed has several insect infestions, including ants, yellowjackets, and wasps.’;

Wormnoun

More loosely, any of various tubular invertebrates resembling annelids but not closely related to them, such as velvet worms, acorn worms, flatworms, or roundworms.

Insectnoun

(colloquial) Any small arthropod similar to an insect including spiders, centipedes, millipedes, etc

‘The swamp is swarming with every sort of insect.’;

Wormnoun

(archaic) A type of wingless "dragon", especially a gigantic sea serpent.

Insectnoun

(derogatory) A contemptible or powerless person.

‘The manager’s assistant was the worst sort of insect.’;

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Wormnoun

Either a mythical "dragon" (especially wingless), a gigantic sea serpent, or a creature that resembles a Mongolian death worm.

Insectnoun

One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See Insecta.

Wormnoun

A contemptible or devious being.

‘Don't try to run away, you little worm!’;

Insectnoun

Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion.

Wormnoun

(computing) A self-replicating program that propagates through a network.

Insectnoun

Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates.

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Wormnoun

(cricket) A graphical representation of the total runs scored in an innings.

Insectnoun

Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing.

Wormnoun

Anything helical, especially the thread of a screw.

Insectadjective

Of or pertaining to an insect or insects.

Wormnoun

A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.

Insectadjective

Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral.

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Wormnoun

The spiral wire of a corkscrew.

Insectnoun

small air-breathing arthropod

Wormnoun

(anatomy) A muscular band in the tongue of some animals, such as dogs; the lytta.

Insectnoun

a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect

Wormnoun

The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to save space.

Insectnoun

a small arthropod animal that has six legs and generally one or two pairs of wings

‘insect pests’;

Wormnoun

A short revolving screw whose threads drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel or rack by gearing into its teeth.

Insectnoun

any small invertebrate animal such as a spider or tick.

Wormnoun

(obsolete) Any creeping or crawling animal, such as a snake, snail, or caterpillar.

Insect

Insects or Insecta (from Latin insectum) are pancrustacean hexapod invertebrates and the largest group within the arthropod phylum. Insects have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body (head, thorax and abdomen), three pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes and one pair of antennae.

Wormnoun

(figuratively) An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one’s mind with remorse.

Wormnoun

(math) A strip of linked tiles sharing parallel edges in a tiling.

Wormnoun

(anatomy) The lytta.

Wormnoun

A dance, or dance move, in which the dancer lies on the floor and undulates the body horizontally thereby moving forwards.

Wormverb

(transitive) To make (one's way) with a crawling motion.

‘We wormed our way through the underbrush.’;

Wormverb

(intransitive) To move with one's body dragging the ground.

Wormverb

To work one's way by artful or devious means.

Wormverb

To work (one's way or oneself) (into) gradually or slowly; to insinuate.

‘He wormed his way into the organization’;

Wormverb

To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out.

Wormverb

To drag out of, to get information that someone is reluctant or unwilling to give (through artful or devious means or by pleading or asking repeatedly).

Wormverb

To fill in the contlines of (a rope) before parcelling and serving.

‘Worm and parcel with the lay; turn and serve the other way.’;

Wormverb

(transitive) To deworm (an animal).

Wormverb

(transitive) To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of (a dog, etc.) for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw, and formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.

Wormverb

(transitive) To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm.

Wormnoun

A creeping or a crawling animal of any kind or size, as a serpent, caterpillar, snail, or the like.

‘There came a viper out of the heat, and leapt on his hand. When the men of the country saw the worm hang on his hand, they said, This man must needs be a murderer.’; ‘'T is slander,Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongueOutvenoms all the worms of Nile.’; ‘When Cerberus perceived us, the great worm,His mouth he opened and displayed his tusks.’;

Wormnoun

Any small creeping animal or reptile, either entirely without feet, or with very short ones, including a great variety of animals; as, an earthworm; the blindworm.

Wormnoun

An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one's mind with remorse.

‘The worm of conscience still begnaw thy soul!’;

Wormnoun

A being debased and despised.

‘I am a worm, and no man.’;

Wormnoun

Anything spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm

‘The threads of screws, when bigger than can be made in screw plates, are called worms.’;

Wormnoun

A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.

Wormverb

To work slowly, gradually, and secretly.

‘When debates and fretting jealousyDid worm and work within you more and more,Your color faded.’;

Wormverb

To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; - often followed by out.

‘They find themselves wormed out of all power.’; ‘They . . . wormed things out of me that I had no desire to tell.’;

Wormverb

To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm. See Worm, n. 5 (b).

Wormverb

To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of, as a dog, for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw. The operation was formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.

‘The men assisted the laird in his sporting parties, wormed his dogs, and cut the ears of his terrier puppies.’;

Wormverb

To wind rope, yarn, or other material, spirally round, between the strands of, as a cable; to wind with spun yarn, as a small rope.

‘Ropes . . . are generally wormed before they are served.’;

Wormnoun

any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae

Wormnoun

a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect

Wormnoun

a software program capable of reproducing itself that can spread from one computer to the next over a network;

‘worms take advantage of automatic file sending and receiving features found on many computers’;

Wormnoun

screw thread on a gear with the teeth of a worm wheel or rack

Wormverb

to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling);

‘The prisoner writhed in discomfort’; ‘The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace’;

Worm

Worms are many different distantly related animals that typically have a long cylindrical tube-like body, no limbs, and no eyes. Worms vary in size from microscopic to over 1 metre (3.3 ft) in length for marine polychaete worms (bristle worms), 6.7 metres (22 ft) for the African giant earthworm, Microchaetus rappi, and 58 metres (190 ft) for the marine nemertean worm (bootlace worm), Lineus longissimus.

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