VS.

Witch vs. Watch

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Witchnoun

A person who practices witchcraft; a woman or man who practices witchcraft.

Watchnoun

A portable or wearable timepiece.

‘More people today carry a watch on their wrists than in their pockets.’;

Witchnoun

(now usually particularly) A woman who is learned in and actively practices witchcraft.

Watchnoun

The act of guarding and observing someone or something.

Witchnoun

(derogatory) An ugly or unpleasant woman.

‘I hate that old witch.’;

Watchnoun

A particular time period when guarding is kept.

‘The second watch of the night began at midnight.’;

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Witchnoun

One who exercises more-than-common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person.

Watchnoun

A person or group of people who guard.

‘The watch stopped the travelers at the city gates.’;

Witchnoun

One given to mischief, especially a woman or child.

Watchnoun

The post or office of a watchman; also, the place where a watchman is posted, or where a guard is kept.

Witchnoun

(geometry) A certain curve of the third order, described by Maria Agnesi under the name versiera.

Watchnoun

(nautical) A group of sailors and officers aboard a ship or shore station with a common period of duty: starboard watch, port watch.

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Witchnoun

The stormy petrel.

Watchnoun

(nautical) A period of time on duty, usually four hours in length; the officers and crew who tend the working of a vessel during the same watch. (FM 55–501).

Witchnoun

Any of a number of flatfish:

Watchnoun

The act of seeing, or viewing, for a period of time.

Witchnoun

Glyptocephalus cynoglossus (Torbay sole), found in the North Atlantic.

Watchverb

(transitive) To look at, see, or view for a period of time.

‘Watching the clock will not make time go faster.’; ‘I'm tired of watching TV.’;

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Witchnoun

Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis (megrim), found in the North Atlantic.

Watchverb

(transitive) To observe over a period of time; to notice or pay attention.

‘Watch this!’; ‘Put a little baking soda in some vinegar and watch what happens.’;

Witchnoun

Arnoglossus scapha, found near New Zealand.

Watchverb

(transitive) To mind, attend, or guard.

‘Please watch my suitcase for a minute.’; ‘He has to watch the kids that afternoon.’;

Witchnoun

A cone of paper which is placed in a vessel of lard or other fat and used as a taper.

Watchverb

(transitive) To be wary or cautious of.

‘You should watch that guy. He has a reputation for lying.’;

Witchverb

To practise witchcraft.

Watchverb

(transitive) To attend to dangers to or regarding.

‘watch your head;’; ‘watch your step’; ‘Watch yourself when you talk to him.’; ‘Watch what you say.’;

Witchverb

To bewitch.

Watchverb

(intransitive) To remain awake with a sick or dying person; to maintain a vigil.

Witchverb

(transitive) To dowse for water.

Watchverb

(intransitive) To be vigilant or on one's guard.

‘For some must watch, while some must sleep: So runs the world away.’;

Witchnoun

A cone of paper which is placed in a vessel of lard or other fat, and used as a taper.

Watchverb

(intransitive) To act as a lookout.

Witchnoun

One who practices the black art, or magic; one regarded as possessing supernatural or magical power by compact with an evil spirit, esp. with the Devil; a sorcerer or sorceress; - now applied chiefly or only to women, but formerly used of men as well.

‘There was a man in that city whose name was Simon, a witch.’; ‘He can not abide the old woman of Brentford; he swears she's a witch.’;

Watchverb

To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place.

Witchnoun

An ugly old woman; a hag.

Watchverb

To be awake.

Witchnoun

One who exercises more than common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person; also, one given to mischief; - said especially of a woman or child.

Watchnoun

The act of watching; forbearance of sleep; vigil; wakeful, vigilant, or constantly observant attention; close observation; guard; preservative or preventive vigilance; formerly, a watching or guarding by night.

‘Shepherds keeping watch by night.’; ‘All the long night their mournful watch they keep.’; ‘Still, when she slept, he kept both watch and ward.’; ‘Ward, guard, or custodia, is chiefly applied to the daytime, in order to apprehend rioters, and robbers on the highway . . . Watch, is properly applicable to the night only, . . . and it begins when ward ends, and ends when that begins.’;

Witchnoun

A certain curve of the third order, described by Maria Agnesi under the name versiera.

Watchnoun

One who watches, or those who watch; a watchman, or a body of watchmen; a sentry; a guard.

‘Pilate said unto them, Ye have a watch; go your way, make it as sure as ye can.’;

Witchnoun

The stormy petrel.

Watchnoun

The post or office of a watchman; also, the place where a watchman is posted, or where a guard is kept.

‘He upbraids Iago, that he made himBrave me upon the watch.’;

Witchnoun

A Wiccan; an adherent or practitioner of Wicca, a religion which in different forms may be paganistic and nature-oriented, or ditheistic. The term witch applies to both male and female adherents in this sense.

Watchnoun

The period of the night during which a person does duty as a sentinel, or guard; the time from the placing of a sentinel till his relief; hence, a division of the night.

‘I did stand my watch upon the hill.’; ‘Might we but hear . . . Or whistle from the lodge, or village cockCount the night watches to his feathery dames.’;

Witchverb

To bewitch; to fascinate; to enchant.

‘[I 'll] witch sweet ladies with my words and looks.’; ‘Whether within us or withoutThe spell of this illusion beThat witches us to hear and see.’;

Watchnoun

A small timepiece, or chronometer, to be carried about the person, the machinery of which is moved by a spring.

Witchnoun

a female sorcerer or magician

Watchnoun

An allotted portion of time, usually four hour for standing watch, or being on deck ready for duty. Cf. Dogwatch.

Witchnoun

a being (usually female) imagined to have special powers derived from the devil

Watchverb

To be awake; to be or continue without sleep; to wake; to keep vigil.

‘I have two nights watched with you.’; ‘Couldest thou not watch one hour ?’;

Witchnoun

an ugly evil-looking old woman

Watchverb

To be attentive or vigilant; to give heed; to be on the lookout; to keep guard; to act as sentinel.

‘Take ye heed, watch and pray.’; ‘The Son gave signal highTo the bright minister that watched.’;

Witchverb

cast a spell over someone or something; put a hex on someone or something

Watchverb

To be expectant; to look with expectation; to wait; to seek opportunity.

‘My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning.’;

Watchverb

To remain awake with any one as nurse or attendant; to attend on the sick during the night; as, to watch with a man in a fever.

Watchverb

To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; - said of a buoy.

Watchverb

To give heed to; to observe the actions or motions of, for any purpose; to keep in view; not to lose from sight and observation; as, to watch the progress of a bill in the legislature.

‘Saul also sent messengers unto David's house to watch him, and to slay him.’; ‘I must cool a little, and watch my opportunity.’; ‘In lazy mood I watched the little circles die.’;

Watchverb

To tend; to guard; to have in keeping.

‘And flaming ministers, to watch and tendTheir earthy charge.’; ‘Paris watched the flocks in the groves of Ida.’;

Watchnoun

a small portable timepiece

Watchnoun

a period of time (4 or 2 hours) during which some of a ship's crew are on duty

Watchnoun

a purposeful surveillance to guard or observe

Watchnoun

the period during which someone (especially a guard) is on duty

Watchnoun

a person employed to watch for something to happen

Watchnoun

a devotional watch (especially on the eve of a religious festival)

Watchverb

look attentively;

‘watch a basketball game’;

Watchverb

follow with the eyes or the mind;

‘Keep an eye on the baby, please!’; ‘The world is watching Sarajevo’; ‘She followed the men with the binoculars’;

Watchverb

see or watch;

‘view a show on television’; ‘This program will be seen all over the world’; ‘view an exhibition’; ‘Catch a show on Broadway’; ‘see a movie’;

Watchverb

observe with attention;

‘They watched as the murderer was executed’;

Watchverb

be vigilant, be on the lookout, be on one's guard, be careful;

‘Watch out for pickpockets!’;

Watchverb

observe or determine by looking;

‘Watch how the dog chases the cats away’;

Watchverb

find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort;

‘I want to see whether she speaks French’; ‘See whether it works’; ‘find out if he speaks Russian’; ‘Check whether the train leaves on time’;

Watchverb

look at or observe attentively over a period of time

‘as she watched, two women came into the garden’; ‘Lucy watched him go’; ‘everyone stopped to watch what was going on’;

Watchverb

keep under careful, protective, or secret observation

‘he told me my telephones were tapped and that I was being watched’; ‘there aren't enough staff to watch him properly’;

Watchverb

observe and guard in a protective way

‘I guess I can rest a while, with you here to watch over me’;

Watchverb

follow closely or maintain an interest in

‘the girls watched the development of this relationship with incredulity’;

Watchverb

exercise care, caution, or restraint about

‘you should watch what you say!’; ‘most women watch their diet during pregnancy’;

Watchverb

look out or be on the alert for

‘in spring and summer, watch for kingfishers’; ‘watch out for broken glass’;

Watchverb

be careful

‘credit-card fraud is on the increase, so watch out’;

Watchverb

be careful (used as a warning or threat)

‘if anyone finds out, you're dead meat, so watch it’;

Watchverb

remain awake for the purpose of religious observance

‘she watched whole nights in the church’;

Watchnoun

a small timepiece worn typically on a strap on one's wrist

‘my watch had stopped’;

Watchnoun

an act or instance of carefully observing someone or something over a period of time

‘the security forces have been keeping a close watch on our activities’;

Watchnoun

a period during which a person is stationed to look out for danger or trouble, typically at night

‘Murray took the last watch before dawn’;

Watchnoun

a fixed period of duty on a ship, usually lasting four hours

‘sea air, lots of exercise, and four-hour watches give everyone a healthy appetite’;

Watchnoun

the officers and crew on duty during a watch.

Watchnoun

a shift worked by firefighters or police officers

‘the men of Red Watch at Kingsland Fire Station’;

Watchnoun

a watchman or group of watchmen who patrolled and guarded the streets of a town before the introduction of the police force

‘the woman, with a piercing shriek, called the watch’;

Watchnoun

a film or programme considered in terms of its appeal to the public

‘this movie's an engrossing watch’;

Watchnoun

a flock of nightingales

‘a watch of nightingales began flying south’;

Watch

A watch is a portable timepiece intended to be carried or worn by a person. It is designed to keep a consistent movement despite the motions caused by the person's activities.

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