VS.

Wink vs. Bat

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Winkverb

To close one's eyes in sleep.

Batnoun

Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation.

Winkverb

(intransitive) To close one's eyes.

Batnoun

(offensive) An old woman.

Winkverb

(intransitive) To turn a blind eye; to connive. Usually with at.

Batnoun

A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.

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Winkverb

(intransitive) To close one's eyes quickly and involuntarily; to blink.

Batnoun

A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.

Winkverb

To blink with only one eye as a message, signal, or suggestion, usually with an implication of conspiracy. (When transitive, the object may be the eye being winked, or the message being conveyed.)

‘He winked at me.’; ‘She winked her eye.’; ‘He winked his assent.’;

Batnoun

(two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.

Winkverb

(intransitive) To gleam fitfully or intermitently; to twinkle; to flicker.

Batnoun

(mining) Shale or bituminous shale.

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Winknoun

An act of winking (a blinking of only one eye), or a message sent by winking.

Batnoun

A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.

Winknoun

A brief period of sleep; especially forty winks.

Batnoun

A part of a brick with one whole end.

Winknoun

A brief time; an instant.

Batnoun

A stroke; a sharp blow.

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Winknoun

The smallest possible amount.

Batnoun

A stroke of work.

Winknoun

A subtle allusion.

‘The film includes a wink to wartime rationing.’;

Batnoun

(informal) Rate of motion; speed.

Winknoun

(Chiefly British) Periwinkle.

Batnoun

A spree; a jollification.

Winkverb

To nod; to sleep; to nap.

Batnoun

Manner; rate; condition; state of health.

Winkverb

To shut the eyes quickly; to close the eyelids with a quick motion.

‘He must wink, so loud he would cry.’; ‘And I will wink, so shall the day seem night.’; ‘They are not blind, but they wink.’;

Batnoun

(obsolete) packsaddle

Winkverb

To close and open the eyelids quickly; to nictitate; to blink.

‘A baby of some three months old, who winked, and turned aside its little face from the too vivid light of day.’;

Batverb

(transitive) to hit with a bat.

Winkverb

To give a hint by a motion of the eyelids, often those of one eye only.

‘Wink at the footman to leave him without a plate.’;

Batverb

(intransitive) to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.

Winkverb

To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; - generally with at.

‘The times of this ignorance God winked at.’; ‘And yet, as though he knew it not,His knowledge winks, and lets his humors reign.’; ‘Obstinacy can not be winked at, but must be subdued.’;

Batverb

(intransitive) to strike or swipe as though with a bat

‘The cat batted at the toy.’;

Winkverb

To be dim and flicker; as, the light winks.

Batverb

(transitive) to flutter: bat one's eyelashes.

Winkverb

To cause (the eyes) to wink.

Batverb

To bate or flutter, as a hawk.

Winknoun

The act of closing, or closing and opening, the eyelids quickly; hence, the time necessary for such an act; a moment.

‘I have not slept one wink.’; ‘I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink.’;

Batverb

To wink.

Winknoun

A hint given by shutting the eye with a significant cast.

‘The stockjobber thus from Change Alley goes down,And tips you, the freeman, a wink.’;

Batnoun

A large stick; a club; specifically, a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other, used in playing baseball, cricket, etc.

Winknoun

a very short time (as the time it takes the eye blink or the heart to beat);

‘if I had the chance I'd do it in a flash’;

Batnoun

In badminton, tennis, and similar games, a racket.

Winknoun

closing one eye quickly as a signal

Batnoun

A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.

Winknoun

a reflex that closes and opens the eyes rapidly

Batnoun

A part of a brick with one whole end; a brickbat.

Winkverb

signal by winking;

‘She winked at him’;

Batnoun

Shale or bituminous shale.

Winkverb

gleam or glow intermittently;

‘The lights were flashing’;

Batnoun

A stroke; a sharp blow.

Winkverb

briefly shut the eyes;

‘The TV announcer never seems to blink’;

Batnoun

A stroke of work.

Winkverb

force to go away by blinking;

‘blink away tears’;

Batnoun

Rate of motion; speed.

Winkverb

close and open one eye quickly, typically to indicate that something is a joke or a secret or as a signal of affection or greeting

‘he winked at Nicole as he passed’;

Batnoun

A spree; a jollification.

Winkverb

pretend not to notice (something bad or illegal)

‘the authorities winked at their illegal trade’;

Batnoun

Manner; rate; condition; state of health.

Winkverb

(of a bright object or a light) shine or flash intermittently

‘the diamond on her finger winked in the moonlight’;

Batnoun

One of the Chiroptera, an order of flying mammals, in which the wings are formed by a membrane stretched between the elongated fingers, legs, and tail. The common bats are small and insectivorous. See Chiroptera and Vampire.

‘Silent bats in drowsy clusters cling.’;

Winknoun

an act of winking

‘Barney gave him a knowing wink’;

Batnoun

Same as Tical, n., 1.

Wink

A wink is a facial expression made by briefly closing one eye. A wink is an informal mode of non-verbal communication usually signaling shared hidden knowledge or intent.

Batverb

To strike or hit with a bat or a pole; to cudgel; to beat.

Batverb

To use a bat, as in a game of baseball; when used with a numerical postmodifier it indicates a baseball player's performance (as a decimal) at bat; as, he batted .270 in 1993 (i.e. he got safe hits in 27 percent of his official turns at bat).

Batverb

To bate or flutter, as a hawk.

Batverb

To wink.

Batnoun

nocturnal mouselike mammal with forelimbs modified to form membranous wings and anatomical adaptations for echolocation by which they navigate

Batnoun

(baseball) a turn batting;

‘he was at bat when it happened’; ‘he got 4 hits in 4 at-bats’;

Batnoun

a small racket with a long handle used for playing squash

Batnoun

a bat used in playing cricket

Batnoun

a club used for hitting a ball in various games

Batverb

strike with, or as if with a baseball bat;

‘bat the ball’;

Batverb

wink briefly;

‘bat one's eyelids’;

Batverb

have a turn at bat;

‘Jones bats first, followed by Martinez’;

Batverb

use a bat;

‘Who's batting?’;

Batverb

beat thoroughly in a competition or fight;

‘We licked the other team on Sunday!’;

Batnoun

an implement with a handle and a solid surface, typically of wood, used for hitting the ball in games such as cricket, baseball, and table tennis

‘a cricket bat’;

Batnoun

a turn at playing with a bat.

Batnoun

a person batting, especially in cricket; a batsman

‘the team's opening bat’;

Batnoun

each of a pair of objects resembling table tennis bats, used by a person on the ground to guide a taxiing aircraft.

Batnoun

a slab on which pottery is formed, dried, or fired.

Batnoun

a mainly nocturnal mammal capable of sustained flight, with membranous wings that extend between the fingers and limbs.

Batnoun

a woman regarded as unattractive or unpleasant

‘some deranged old bat’;

Batverb

(of a sports team or player) take the role of hitting rather than throwing the ball

‘Australia reached 263 for 4 after choosing to bat’;

Batverb

defend the interests of; support

‘she turned out to have the law batting for her’;

Batverb

hit at (someone or something) with the flat of one's hand

‘he batted the flies away’;

Batverb

flutter (one's eyelashes or eyelids), typically in a flirtatious manner

‘she batted her long dark eyelashes at him’;

Bat

Bats are mammals of the order Chiroptera. With their forelimbs adapted as wings, they are the only mammals capable of true and sustained flight.

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