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Wind vs. Squall

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Windnoun

Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.

‘The wind blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.’; ‘As they accelerated onto the motorway, the wind tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.’; ‘The winds in Chicago are fierce.’;

Squallnoun

(meteorology) A squall line, multicell line, or part of a squall line.

Windnoun

Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.

‘the wind of a cannon ball;’; ‘the wind of a bellows’;

Squallnoun

A sudden storm, as found in a squall line.

Windnoun

The ability to breathe easily.

‘After the second lap he was already out of wind.’; ‘The fall knocked the wind out of him.’;

Squallnoun

A loud cry or wail.

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Windnoun

News of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip. (Used with catch, often in the past tense.)

‘Steve caught wind of Martha's dalliance with his best friend.’;

Squallverb

To cry or wail loudly.

Windnoun

One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).

Squallnoun

A sudden and violent gust of wind often attended with rain or snow.

‘The gray skirts of a lifting squall.’;

Windnoun

Flatus.

‘Eww. Someone just passed wind.’;

Squallnoun

A loud scream; a harsh cry.

‘There oft are heard the notes of infant woe, -The short, thick sob, loud scream, and shriller squall.’;

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Windnoun

Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.

Squallverb

To cry out; to scream or cry violently, as a woman frightened, or a child in anger or distress; as, the infant squalled.

Windnoun

(music) The woodwind section of an orchestra. Occasionally also used to include the brass section.

Squallnoun

sudden violent winds; often accompanied by precipitation

Windnoun

A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the "four winds".

Squallverb

make high-pitched, whiney noises

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Windnoun

Types of playing-tile in the game of mah-jongg, named after the four winds.

Squallverb

utter a sudden loud cry;

‘she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle’; ‘I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me’;

Windnoun

A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.

Squallverb

blow in a squall;

‘When it squalls, a prudent sailor reefs his sails’;

Windnoun

Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.

Squall

A squall is a sudden, sharp increase in wind speed lasting minutes, contrary to a wind gust lasting seconds. They are usually associated with active weather, such as rain showers, thunderstorms, or heavy snow.

Windnoun

A bird, the dotterel.

Windnoun

The region of the solar plexus, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury.

Windnoun

The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

Windverb

(transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.

Windverb

(transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen.

‘The boxer was winded during round two.’;

Windverb

(reflexive) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath.

‘I can’t run another step — I’m winded.’;

Windverb

(British) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.

Windverb

(transitive) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.

Windverb

(transitive) To perceive or follow by scent.

‘The hounds winded the game.’;

Windverb

(transitive) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.

Windverb

(transitive) To turn a windmill so that its sails face into the wind.

Windverb

(transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.

‘to wind thread on a spool or into a ball’;

Windverb

(transitive) To tighten the spring of a clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.

‘Please wind that old-fashioned alarm clock.’;

Windverb

To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.

Windverb

(ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight.

‘Vines wind round a pole.’; ‘The river winds through the plain.’;

Windverb

To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.

Windverb

To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.

Windverb

To cover or surround with something coiled about.

‘to wind a rope with twine’;

Windverb

To make a winding motion.

Windverb

To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball.

‘Whether to windThe woodbine round this arbor.’;

Windverb

To entwist; to infold; to encircle.

‘Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms.’;

Windverb

To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.

‘In his terms so he would him wind.’; ‘Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do pleaseAnd wind all other witnesses.’; ‘Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.’;

Windverb

To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.

‘You have contrived . . . to windYourself into a power tyrannical.’; ‘Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse.’;

Windverb

To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine.

Windverb

To turn completely or repeatedly; to become coiled about anything; to assume a convolved or spiral form; as, vines wind round a pole.

‘So swift your judgments turn and wind.’;

Windverb

To have a circular course or direction; to crook; to bend; to meander; as, to wind in and out among trees.

‘And where the valley winded out below,The murmuring main was heard, and scarcely heard, to flow.’; ‘He therefore turned him to the steep and rocky path which . . . winded through the thickets of wild boxwood and other low aromatic shrubs.’;

Windverb

To go to the one side or the other; to move this way and that; to double on one's course; as, a hare pursued turns and winds.

‘The lowing herd wind lowly o'er the lea.’; ‘To wind out, to extricate one's self; to escape.Long struggling underneath are they could windOut of such prison.’;

Windverb

To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.

Windverb

To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game.

Windverb

To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath.

Windverb

To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes.

‘Ye vigorous swains, while youth ferments your blood, . . . Wind the shrill horn.’; ‘That blast was winded by the king.’;

Windnoun

The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist; a winding.

Windnoun

Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity; a current of air.

‘Except wind stands as never it stood,It is an ill wind that turns none to good.’; ‘Winds were soft, and woods were green.’;

Windnoun

Air artificially put in motion by any force or action; as, the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.

Windnoun

Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.

‘Their instruments were various in their kind,Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.’;

Windnoun

Power of respiration; breath.

‘If my wind were but long enough to say my prayers, I would repent.’;

Windnoun

Air or gas generated in the stomach or bowels; flatulence; as, to be troubled with wind.

Windnoun

Air impregnated with an odor or scent.

‘A pack of dogfish had him in the wind.’;

Windnoun

A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds.

‘Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain.’;

Windnoun

A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.

Windnoun

Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.

‘Nor think thou with windOf airy threats to awe.’;

Windnoun

The dotterel.

Windnoun

The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark.

Windnoun

air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure;

‘trees bent under the fierce winds’; ‘when there is no wind, row’; ‘the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere’;

Windnoun

a tendency or force that influences events;

‘the winds of change’;

Windnoun

breath;

‘the collision knocked the wind out of him’;

Windnoun

empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk;

‘that's a lot of wind’; ‘don't give me any of that jazz’;

Windnoun

an indication of potential opportunity;

‘he got a tip on the stock market’; ‘a good lead for a job’;

Windnoun

a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an enclosed column of air that is moved by the breath

Windnoun

a reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus

Windnoun

the act of winding or twisting;

‘he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind’;

Windverb

to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course;

‘the river winds through the hills’; ‘the path meanders through the vineyards’; ‘sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body’;

Windverb

extend in curves and turns;

‘The road winds around the lake’;

Windverb

wrap or coil around;

‘roll your hair around your finger’; ‘Twine the thread around the spool’;

Windverb

catch the scent of; get wind of;

‘The dog nosed out the drugs’;

Windverb

coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a stem;

‘wind your watch’;

Windverb

form into a wreath

Windverb

raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help;

‘hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car’;

Wind

Wind is the natural movement of air or other gases relative to a planet's surface. Wind occurs on a range of scales, from thunderstorm flows lasting tens of minutes, to local breezes generated by heating of land surfaces and lasting a few hours, to global winds resulting from the difference in absorption of solar energy between the climate zones on Earth.

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