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Whole vs. Skim — What's the Difference?

Whole vs. Skim — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Whole and Skim

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Whole

Containing all components; complete
The whole series of novels.

Skim

To remove floating matter from (a liquid).

Whole

Not divided or disjoined; in one unit
A whole loaf.

Skim

To remove (floating matter) from a liquid.

Whole

Constituting the full amount, extent, or duration
The baby cried the whole trip home.
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Skim

To embezzle (money) by taking a small portion on each transaction
Corrupt governments skimming money from foreign aid.

Whole

Not wounded, injured, or impaired; sound or unhurt
Many escaped the fire frightened but whole.

Skim

To fail to declare part of (certain income, such as winnings) to avoid tax payment.

Whole

Having been restored; healed
After the treatment he felt whole.

Skim

To copy information from (a credit card) as part of a skimming fraud.

Whole

Having the same parents
A whole sister.

Skim

To coat or cover with a thin layer
"the still, shallow water solidly frozen and skimmed with white" (Barbara Hurd).

Whole

A number, group, set, or thing lacking no part or element; a complete thing.

Skim

(intransitive) To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.

Whole

An entity or system made up of interrelated parts
The value of the whole was greater than the sum of its parts.

Skim

(transitive) To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.

Whole

Entirely; wholly
A whole new idea.

Skim

To hasten along with superficial attention.

Whole

Entire, undivided.
I ate a whole fish.

Skim

To put on a finishing coat of plaster.

Whole

Used as an intensifier.
I brought a whole lot of balloons for the party.
She ate a whole bunch of french fries.

Skim

(transitive) To throw an object so it bounces on water.
Skimming stones

Whole

Sound, uninjured, healthy.
He is of whole mind, but the same cannot be said about his physical state.

Skim

(intransitive) To ricochet.

Whole

(of food) From which none of its constituents has been removed.
Whole wheat; whole milk

Skim

(transitive) To read quickly, skipping some detail.
I skimmed the newspaper over breakfast.

Whole

(mining) As yet unworked.

Skim

(transitive) To scrape off; to remove (something) from a surface

Whole

(colloquial) In entirety; entirely; wholly.
I ate a fish whole!

Skim

(transitive) To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying on it, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface.
To skim milk
To skim broth

Whole

Something complete, without any parts missing.
This variety of fascinating details didn't fall together into an enjoyable, coherent whole.

Skim

(transitive) To clear a liquid from (scum or substance floating or lying on it), especially the cream that floats on top of fresh milk.
To skim cream

Whole

An entirety.

Skim

To steal money from a business before the transaction has been recorded, thus avoiding detection.

Whole

Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation.
The whole race of mankind.

Skim

To surreptitiously scan a payment card in order to obtain its information for fraudulent purposes.

Whole

Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral; as, a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole.
My life is yet whole in me.

Skim

(intransitive) To become coated over.

Whole

Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well.
[She] findeth there her friends hole and sound.
They that be whole need not a physician.
When Sir Lancelot's deadly hurt was whole.
All the whole army stood agazed on him.
One entire and perfect chrysolite.
Lest total darkness should by night regainHer old possession, and extinguish life.
So absolute she seems,And in herself complete.

Skim

(of milk) Having lowered fat content.

Whole

The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.
"This not the whole of life to live,Nor all of death to die.

Skim

A cursory reading, skipping the details.

Whole

A regular combination of parts; a system.
Parts answering parts shall slide into a whole.

Skim

(informal) Skim milk.

Whole

All of something including all its component elements or parts;
Europe considered as a whole
The whole of American literature

Skim

The act of skimming.

Whole

An assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity;
How big is that part compared to the whole?
The team is a unit

Skim

That which is skimmed off.

Whole

Including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete;
Gave his whole attention
A whole wardrobe for the tropics
The whole hog
A whole week
The baby cried the whole trip home
A whole loaf of bread

Skim

Theft of money from a business before the transaction has been recorded, thus avoiding detection.

Whole

(of siblings) having the same parents;
Whole brothers and sisters

Skim

To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying thereon, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface; as, to skim milk; to skim broth.

Whole

Exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health;
Hale and hearty
Whole in mind and body
A whole person again

Skim

To take off by skimming; as, to skim cream.

Whole

To a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly');
He was wholly convinced
Entirely satisfied with the meal
It was completely different from what we expected
Was completely at fault
A totally new situation
The directions were all wrong
It was not altogether her fault
An altogether new approach
A whole new idea

Skim

To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.
Homer describes Mercury as flinging himself from the top of Olympus, and skimming the surface of the ocean.

Skim

Fig.: To read or examine superficially and rapidly, in order to cull the principal facts or thoughts; as, to skim a book or a newspaper.

Skim

To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.
Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain,Flies o'er the unbending corn, and skims along the main.

Skim

To hasten along with superficial attention.
They skim over a science in a very superficial survey.

Skim

To put on the finishing coat of plaster.

Skim

Contraction of Skimming and Skimmed.

Skim

A thin layer covering the surface of a liquid;
There was a thin skim of oil on the water

Skim

Reading or glancing through quickly

Skim

Travel on the surface of water

Skim

Move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of

Skim

Examine hastily;
She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi

Skim

Cause to skip over a surface;
Skip a stone across the pond

Skim

Coat (a liquid) with a layer

Skim

Remove from the surface;
Skim cream from the surface of milk

Skim

Read superficially

Skim

Used of milk and milk products from which the cream has been removed;
Yogurt made with skim milk
She can drink skimmed milk but should avoid butter

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