VS.

Whelp vs. Welp

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Whelpnoun

A young offspring of a canid (ursid, felid, pinniped), especially of a dog or a wolf, the young of a bear or similar mammal (lion, tiger, seal); a pup, wolf cub.

Welpinterjection

(slang) Well, typically used in exasperation.

Whelpnoun

(derogatory) An insolent youth; a mere child.

Welpinterjection

non-standard spelling of well, representing a pronunciation (typically used to convey resignation or disappointment)

‘welp, last night was certainly an experience’; ‘welp, spring break is pretty much over’;

Whelpnoun

(obsolete) A kind of ship.

Whelpnoun

One of several wooden strips to prevent wear on a windlass on a clipper-era ship.

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Whelpnoun

A tooth on a sprocket wheel (compare sprocket and cog).

Whelpverb

To give birth.

‘The bitch whelped.’; ‘The she-wolf whelped a large litter of cubs.’;

Whelpinterjection

alternative form of welp

Whelpnoun

One of the young of a dog or a beast of prey; a puppy; a cub; as, a lion's whelps.

Whelpnoun

A child; a youth; - jocosely or in contempt.

‘That awkward whelp with his money bags would have made his entrance.’;

Whelpnoun

One of the longitudinal ribs or ridges on the barrel of a capstan or a windless; - usually in the plural; as, the whelps of a windlass.

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Whelpnoun

One of the teeth of a sprocket wheel.

Whelpverb

To bring forth young; - said of the female of the dog and some beasts of prey.

Whelpverb

To bring forth, as cubs or young; to give birth to.

‘Unless she had whelped it herself, she could not have loved a thing better.’; ‘Did thy foul fancy whelp so black a scheme?’;

Whelpnoun

young of any of various canines such as a dog or wolf

Whelpverb

birth;

‘the dog whelped’;

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