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Wave vs. Quiver

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Waveverb

(intransitive) To move back and forth repeatedly.

‘The flag waved in the gentle breeze.’;

Quivernoun

(weaponry) A container for arrows, crossbow bolts or darts, such as those fired from a bow, crossbow or blowgun.

Waveverb

(intransitive) To move one’s hand back and forth (generally above the head) in greeting or departure.

Quivernoun

(figuratively) A ready storage location for figurative tools or weapons.

‘He's got lots of sales pitches in his quiver.’;

Waveverb

To call attention to, or give a direction or command to, by a waving motion, as of the hand; to signify by waving; to beckon; to signal; to indicate.

‘I waved goodbye from across the room.’;

Quivernoun

(obsolete) The collective noun for cobras.

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Waveverb

(intransitive) To have an undulating or wavy form.

Quivernoun

(mathematics) A multidigraph.

Waveverb

(transitive) To raise into inequalities of surface; to give an undulating form or surface to.

Quiveradjective

(archaic) Nimble, active.

Waveverb

(transitive) To produce waves to the hair.

Quiververb

(intransitive) To shake or move with slight and tremulous motion; to tremble; to quake; to shudder; to shiver.

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Waveverb

To swing and miss at a pitch.

‘Jones waves at strike one.’;

Quiveradjective

Nimble; active.

Waveverb

(transitive) To cause to move back and forth repeatedly.

‘The starter waved the flag to begin the race.’;

Quiververb

To shake or move with slight and tremulous motion; to tremble; to quake; to shudder; to shiver.

‘The green leaves quiver with the cooling wind.’; ‘And left the limbs still quivering on the ground.’;

Waveverb

To signal (someone or something) with a waving movement.

Quivernoun

The act or state of quivering; a tremor.

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Waveverb

To fluctuate; to waver; to be in an unsettled state.

Quivernoun

A case or sheath for arrows to be carried on the person.

‘Beside him hung his bowAnd quiver, with three-bolted thunder stored.’;

Waveverb

To move like a wave, or by floating; to waft.

Quivernoun

an almost pleasurable sensation of fright;

‘a frisson of surprise shot through him’;

Waveverb

obsolete spelling of waive

Quivernoun

a shaky motion;

‘the shaking of his fingers as he lit his pipe’;

Wavenoun

A moving disturbance in the level of a body of liquid; an undulation.

‘The wave traveled from the center of the lake before breaking on the shore.’;

Quivernoun

case for holding arrows

Wavenoun

(physics) A moving disturbance in the energy level of a field.

‘Gravity waves, while predicted by theory for decades, have been notoriously difficult to detect.’;

Quivernoun

the act of vibrating

Wavenoun

A shape that alternatingly curves in opposite directions.

‘Her hair had a nice wave to it.’; ‘sine wave’;

Quiververb

shake with fast, tremulous movements;

‘His nostrils palpitated’;

Wavenoun

(figuratively) A sudden unusually large amount of something that is temporarily experienced.

‘A wave of shoppers stampeded through the door when the store opened for its Christmas discount special.’; ‘A wave of retirees began moving to the coastal area.’; ‘A wave of emotion overcame her when she thought about her son who was killed in battle.’; ‘The grief and anxiety came in waves for the affected families.’;

Quiververb

move back and forth very rapidly;

‘the candle flickered’;

Wavenoun

One of the successive swarms of enemies sent to attack the player in certain games.

Quiververb

move with or as if with a regular alternating motion;

‘the city pulsated with music and excitement’;

Wavenoun

A sideway movement of the hand(s).

‘He dismissed her with a wave of the hand.’;

Quiver

A quiver is a container for holding arrows, bolts, darts, or javelins. It can be carried on an archer's body, the bow, or the ground, depending on the type of shooting and the archer's personal preference.

Wavenoun

(usually "the wave") A group activity in a crowd imitating a wave going through water, where people in successive parts of the crowd stand and stretch upward, then sit.

Waveverb

See Waive.

Waveverb

To play loosely; to move like a wave, one way and the other; to float; to flutter; to undulate.

‘His purple robes waved careless to the winds.’; ‘Where the flags of three nations has successively waved.’;

Waveverb

To be moved to and fro as a signal.

Waveverb

To fluctuate; to waver; to be in an unsettled state; to vacillate.

‘He waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good nor harm.’;

Waveverb

To move one way and the other; to brandish.

Waveverb

To raise into inequalities of surface; to give an undulating form a surface to.

‘Horns whelked and waved like the enridged sea.’;

Waveverb

To move like a wave, or by floating; to waft.

Waveverb

To call attention to, or give a direction or command to, by a waving motion, as of the hand; to signify by waving; to beckon; to signal; to indicate.

‘Look, with what courteous actionIt waves you to a more removed ground.’; ‘She spoke, and bowing wavedDismissal.’;

Wavenoun

An advancing ridge or swell on the surface of a liquid, as of the sea, resulting from the oscillatory motion of the particles composing it when disturbed by any force their position of rest; an undulation.

‘The wave behind impels the wave before.’;

Wavenoun

A vibration propagated from particle to particle through a body or elastic medium, as in the transmission of sound; an assemblage of vibrating molecules in all phases of a vibration, with no phase repeated; a wave of vibration; an undulation. See Undulation.

Wavenoun

Water; a body of water.

‘Build a ship to save thee from the flood,I 'll furnish thee with fresh wave, bread, and wine.’;

Wavenoun

Unevenness; inequality of surface.

Wavenoun

A waving or undulating motion; a signal made with the hand, a flag, etc.

Wavenoun

The undulating line or streak of luster on cloth watered, or calendered, or on damask steel.

Wavenoun

Something resembling or likened to a water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm; waves of applause.

Wavenoun

one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)

Wavenoun

a movement like that of an ocean wave;

‘a wave of settlers’; ‘troops advancing in waves’;

Wavenoun

(physics) a movement up and down or back and forth

Wavenoun

something that rises rapidly;

‘a wave of emotion swept over him’; ‘there was a sudden wave of buying before the market closed’; ‘a wave of conservatism in the country led by the hard right’;

Wavenoun

the act of signaling by a movement of the hand

Wavenoun

a hairdo that creates undulations in the hair

Wavenoun

an undulating curve

Wavenoun

a persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures)

Wavenoun

a member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy; originally organized during World War II but now no longer a separate branch

Waveverb

signal with the hands or nod;

‘She waved to her friends’; ‘He waved his hand hospitably’;

Waveverb

move or swing back and forth;

‘She waved her gun’;

Waveverb

move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion;

‘The curtains undulated’; ‘the waves rolled towards the beach’;

Waveverb

twist or roll into coils or ringlets;

‘curl my hair, please’;

Waveverb

set waves in;

‘she asked the hairdresser to wave her hair’;

Waveverb

move one's hand to and fro in greeting or as a signal

‘he waved to me from the train’;

Waveverb

move (one's hand or arm, or something held in one's hand) to and fro

‘he waved a sheaf of papers in the air’;

Waveverb

convey (a greeting or other message) by waving one's hand or something held in it

‘we waved our farewells’; ‘she waved him goodbye’;

Waveverb

instruct (someone) to move in a particular direction by moving one's hand

‘he waved her back’;

Waveverb

move to and fro with a swaying motion while remaining fixed to one point

‘the flag waved in the wind’;

Waveverb

style (hair) so that it curls slightly

‘her hair had been carefully waved for the evening’;

Waveverb

(of hair) grow with a slight curl

‘she marvelled at the blueness of his eyes, how straight his nose was, the way his hair waved’;

Wavenoun

a long body of water curling into an arched form and breaking on the shore

‘he was swept out to sea by a freak wave’;

Wavenoun

a ridge of water between two depressions in open water

‘gulls and cormorants bobbed on the waves’;

Wavenoun

a shape regarded as resembling a breaking wave

‘a wave of treetops stretched to the horizon’;

Wavenoun

the sea.

Wavenoun

a sudden occurrence of or increase in a phenomenon, feeling, or emotion

‘fear came over me in waves’; ‘a wave of strikes had paralysed the government’;

Wavenoun

a gesture or signal made by moving one's hand to and fro

‘he gave a little wave and walked off’;

Wavenoun

a slightly curling lock of hair

‘his hair was drying in unruly waves’;

Wavenoun

a tendency to curl in a person's hair

‘her hair has a slight natural wave’;

Wavenoun

a periodic disturbance of the particles of a substance which may be propagated without net movement of the particles, such as in the passage of undulating motion, heat, or sound.

Wavenoun

a single curve in the course of a periodic disturbance of the particles of a substance.

Wavenoun

a periodic variation of an electromagnetic field in the propagation of light or other radiation through a medium or vacuum.

Wave

In physics, mathematics, and related fields, a wave is a propagating dynamic disturbance (change from equilibrium) of one or more quantities, sometimes as described by a wave equation. In physical waves, at least two field quantities in the wave medium are involved.

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