VS.

Wait vs. Hope

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Waitverb

To delay movement or action until the arrival or occurrence of; to await. (Now generally superseded by “wait for”.)

Hopenoun

The belief or expectation that something wished for can or will happen.

‘I still have some hope that I can get to work on time.’; ‘After losing my job, there's no hope of being able to afford my world cruise.’; ‘There is still hope that we can find our missing cat.’;

Waitverb

(intransitive) To delay movement or action until some event or time; to remain neglected or in readiness.

‘Wait here until your car arrives.’;

Hopenoun

(countable) The actual thing wished for.

Waitverb

To wait tables; to serve customers in a restaurant or other eating establishment.

‘She used to wait down at the Dew Drop Inn.’;

Hopenoun

(countable) A person or thing that is a source of hope.

‘We still have one hope left: my roommate might see the note I left on the table.’;

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Waitverb

To attend on; to accompany; especially, to attend with ceremony or respect.

Hopenoun

The virtuous desire for future good.

Waitverb

(obsolete) To attend as a consequence; to follow upon; to accompany.

Hopenoun

A hollow; a valley, especially the upper end of a narrow mountain valley when it is nearly encircled by smooth, green slopes; a comb.

Waitverb

To defer or postpone (especially a meal).

‘to wait dinner’;

Hopenoun

A sloping plain between mountain ridges.

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Waitverb

(intransitive) To remain celibate while one's lover is unavailable.

Hopenoun

(Scotland) A small bay; an inlet; a haven.

Waitnoun

A delay.

‘I had a very long wait at the airport security check.’;

Hopeverb

To want something to happen, with a sense of expectation that it might.

‘I hope everyone enjoyed the meal.’; ‘I am still hoping that all will turn out well.’;

Waitnoun

An ambush.

‘They lay in wait for the patrol.’;

Hopeverb

To be optimistic; be full of hope; have hopes.

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Waitnoun

(obsolete) One who watches; a watchman.

Hopeverb

(intransitive) To place confidence; to trust with confident expectation of good; usually followed by in.

Waitnoun

Hautboys, or oboes, played by town musicians.

Hopeverb

To wish.

Waitnoun

Musicians who sing or play at night or in the early morning, especially at Christmas time; serenaders; musical watchmen. [formerly waites, wayghtes.]

Hopenoun

A sloping plain between mountain ridges.

Waitverb

To watch; to observe; to take notice.

‘"But [unless] ye wait well and be privy,I wot right well, I am but dead," quoth she.’;

Hopenoun

A small bay; an inlet; a haven.

Waitverb

To stay or rest in expectation; to stop or remain stationary till the arrival of some person or event; to rest in patience; to stay; not to depart.

‘All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.’; ‘They also serve who only stand and wait.’; ‘Haste, my dear father; 't is no time to wait.’;

Hopenoun

A desire of some good, accompanied with an expectation of obtaining it, or a belief that it is obtainable; an expectation of something which is thought to be desirable; confidence; pleasing expectancy.

‘The hypocrite's hope shall perish.’; ‘He wished, but not with hope.’; ‘New thoughts of God, new hopes of Heaven.’;

Waitverb

To stay for; to rest or remain stationary in expectation of; to await; as, to wait orders.

‘Awed with these words, in camps they still abide,And wait with longing looks their promised guide.’;

Hopenoun

One who, or that which, gives hope, furnishes ground of expectation, or promises desired good.

‘The Lord will be the hope of his people.’; ‘A young gentleman of great hopes, whose love of learning was highly commendable.’;

Waitverb

To attend as a consequence; to follow upon; to accompany; to await.

Hopenoun

That which is hoped for; an object of hope.

‘Lavina is thine elder brother's hope.’;

Waitverb

To attend on; to accompany; especially, to attend with ceremony or respect.

‘He chose a thousand horse, the flower of allHis warlike troops, to wait the funeral.’; ‘Remorse and heaviness of heart shall wait thee,And everlasting anguish be thy portion.’;

Hopeverb

To entertain or indulge hope; to cherish a desire of good, or of something welcome, with expectation of obtaining it or belief that it is obtainable; to expect; - usually followed by for.

‘But I will hope continually.’;

Waitverb

To cause to wait; to defer; to postpone; - said of a meal; as, to wait dinner.

Hopeverb

To place confidence; to trust with confident expectation of good; - usually followed by in.

‘Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope thou in God.’;

Waitnoun

The act of waiting; a delay; a halt.

‘There is a wait of three hours at the border Mexican town of El Paso.’;

Hopeverb

To desire with expectation or with belief in the possibility or prospect of obtaining; to look forward to as a thing desirable, with the expectation of obtaining it; to cherish hopes of.

‘We hope no other from your majesty.’; ‘[Charity] hopeth all things.’;

Waitnoun

Ambush.

Hopeverb

To expect; to fear.

Waitnoun

One who watches; a watchman.

Hopenoun

a specific instance of feeling hopeful;

‘it revived their hope of winning the pennant’;

Waitnoun

Hautboys, or oboes, played by town musicians; not used in the singular.

Hopenoun

the general feeling that some desire will be fulfilled;

‘in spite of his troubles he never gave up hope’;

Waitnoun

Musicians who sing or play at night or in the early morning, especially at Christmas time; serenaders; musical watchmen.

‘Hark! are the waits abroad?’; ‘The sound of the waits, rude as may be their minstrelsy, breaks upon the mild watches of a winter night with the effect of perfect harmony.’;

Hopenoun

grounds for feeling hopeful about the future;

‘there is little or no promise that he will recover’;

Waitnoun

time during which some action is awaited;

‘instant replay caused too long a delay’; ‘he ordered a hold in the action’;

Hopenoun

someone (or something) on which expectations are centered;

‘he was their best hope for a victory’;

Waitnoun

the act of waiting (remaining inactive in one place while expecting something);

‘the wait was an ordeal for him’;

Hopenoun

United States comedian (born in England) who appeared in films with Bing Crosby (born in 1903)

Waitverb

stay in one place and anticipate or expect something;

‘I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets’;

Hopenoun

one of the three Christian virtues

Waitverb

wait before acting

Hopeverb

expect and wish;

‘I trust you will behave better from now on’; ‘I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise’;

Waitverb

look forward to the probable occurrence of;

‘We were expecting a visit from our relatives’; ‘She is looking to a promotion’; ‘he is waiting to be drafted’;

Hopeverb

be optimistic; be full of hope; have hopes;

‘I am still hoping that all will turn out well’;

Waitverb

serve as a waiter in a restaurant;

‘I'm waiting on tables at Maxim's’;

Hopeverb

intend with some possibility of fulfilment;

‘I hope to have finished this work by tomorrow evening’;

Waitverb

stay where one is or delay action until a particular time or event

‘he did not wait for a reply’; ‘we're waiting for Allan to get back’; ‘Vera did not wait on a Home Office ruling’; ‘Ben stood on the street corner waiting to cross’; ‘I had to wait my turn to play’;

Hope

Hope is an optimistic state of mind that is based on an expectation of positive outcomes with respect to events and circumstances in one's life or the world at large. As a verb, its definitions include: and Among its opposites are dejection, hopelessness, and despair.

‘expect with confidence’; ‘to cherish a desire with anticipation.’;

Waitverb

stay where one is or delay action until (someone) arrives or is ready

‘he sits on the corner waiting for Mary’; ‘she was waiting on her boyfriend’;

Waitverb

be left until a later time before being dealt with

‘we shall need a statement later, but that will have to wait’;

Waitverb

defer (a meal) until a person's arrival

‘I told my parents not to wait supper’;

Waitverb

remain in readiness for a purpose

‘he found the train waiting on the platform’;

Waitverb

(of a vehicle) be parked for a short time at the side of a road.

Waitverb

used to indicate that one is eagerly impatient to do something or for something to happen

‘I can't wait to tell Nick what happened’;

Waitverb

act as a waiter or waitress, serving food and drink

‘a local man was employed to wait on them at table’; ‘we had to wait tables in the mess hall’;

Waitnoun

a period of waiting

‘we had a long wait’;

Waitnoun

street singers of Christmas carols.

Waitnoun

official bands of musicians maintained by a city or town.

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