VS.

Void vs. Pocket

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Voidadjective

Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

Pocketnoun

A bag stitched to an item of clothing, used for carrying small items.

Voidadjective

Having no incumbent; unoccupied; said of offices etc.

Pocketnoun

Such a receptacle seen as housing someone's money; hence, financial resources.

‘I paid for it out of my own pocket.’;

Voidadjective

Being without; destitute; devoid.

Pocketnoun

An indention and cavity with a net sack or similar structure (into which the balls are to be struck) at each corner and one centered on each side of a pool or snooker table.

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Voidadjective

Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.

Pocketnoun

An enclosed volume of one substance surrounded by another.

‘The drilling expedition discovered a pocket of natural gas.’;

Voidadjective

Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification.

‘null and void’;

Pocketnoun

(Australia) An area of land surrounded by a loop of a river.

Voidadjective

Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.

Pocketnoun

(Australian rules football) The area of the field to the side of the goal posts (four pockets in total on the field, one to each side of the goals at each end of the ground). The pocket is only a roughly defined area, extending from the behind post, at an angle, to perhaps about 30 meters out.

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Voidadjective

That does not return a value.

Pocketnoun

(American football) The region directly behind the offensive line in which the quarterback executes plays.

Voidnoun

An empty space; a vacuum.

‘Nobody has crossed the void since one man died trying three hundred years ago; it's high time we had another go.’;

Pocketnoun

(military) An area where military units are completely surrounded by enemy units.

Voidnoun

(astronomy) An extended region of space containing no galaxies

Pocketnoun

(rugby) The position held by a second defensive middle, where an advanced middle must retreat after making a touch on the attacking middle.

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Voidnoun

(materials science) A collection of adjacent vacancies inside a crystal lattice.

Pocketnoun

A large bag or sack formerly used for packing various articles, such as ginger, hops, or cowries; the pocket of wool held about 168 pounds.

Voidnoun

(fluid mechanics) A pocket of vapour inside a fluid flow, created by cavitation.

Pocketnoun

(architecture) A hole or space covered by a movable piece of board, as in a floor, boxing, partitions, etc.

Voidnoun

A voidee.

Pocketnoun

(mining) A cavity in a rock containing a nugget of gold, or other mineral; a small body of ore contained in such a cavity.

Voidverb

(transitive) To make invalid or worthless.

‘He voided the check and returned it.’;

Pocketnoun

(nautical) A strip of canvas sewn upon a sail so that a batten or a light spar can placed in the interspace.

Voidverb

To empty.

‘void one’s bowels’;

Pocketnoun

The pouch of an animal.

Voidverb

To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge.

‘to void excrement’;

Pocketnoun

(bowling) The ideal point where the pins are hit by the bowling ball.

Voidverb

To withdraw, depart.

Pocketnoun

A socket for receiving the base of a post, stake, etc.

Voidverb

To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave.

‘to void a table’;

Pocketnoun

A bight on a lee shore.

Voidadjective

Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

‘The earth was without form, and void.’; ‘I 'll get me to a place more void.’; ‘I 'll chain him in my study, that, at void hours,I may run over the story of his country.’;

Pocketnoun

(dentistry) A small space between a tooth and the adjoining gum, formed by an abnormal separation of the two.

Voidadjective

Having no incumbent; unoccupied; - said of offices and the like.

‘Divers great offices that had been long void.’;

Pocketnoun

A small, isolated group or area.

Voidadjective

Being without; destitute; free; wanting; devoid; as, void of learning, or of common use.

‘A conscience void of offense toward God.’; ‘He that is void of wisdom despiseth his neighbor.’;

Pocketverb

(transitive) To put (something) into a pocket.

Voidadjective

Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.

‘[My word] shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please.’; ‘I will make void the counsel of Judah.’;

Pocketverb

To cause a ball to go into one of the pockets of the table; to complete a shot.

Voidadjective

Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.

Pocketverb

To take and keep (something, especially money that is not one's own).

‘Record executives pocketed most of the young singer's earnings.’;

Voidadjective

Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification; null. Cf. Voidable, 2.

Pocketverb

To shoplift; to steal. en

‘The thief was caught on camera pocketing the diamond.’;

Voidnoun

An empty space; a vacuum.

‘Pride, where wit fails, steps in to our defense,And fills up all the mighty void of sense.’;

Pocketverb

To put up with; to bear without complaint.

Voidverb

To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave; as, to void a table.

‘Void anon her place.’; ‘If they will fight with us, bid them come down,Or void the field.’;

Pocketadjective

Of a size suitable for putting into a pocket.

‘a pocket dictionary’;

Voidverb

To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge; as, to void excrements.

‘A watchful application of mind in voiding prejudices.’; ‘With shovel, like a fury, voided outThe earth and scattered bones.’;

Pocketadjective

Smaller or more compact than usual.

‘pocket battleship, pocket beach’;

Voidverb

To render void; to make to be of no validity or effect; to vacate; to annul; to nullify.

‘After they had voided the obligation of the oath he had taken.’; ‘It was become a practice . . . to void the security that was at any time given for money so borrowed.’;

Pocketadjective

Referring to the two initial hole cards.

‘a pocket pair of kings’;

Voidverb

To be emitted or evacuated.

Pocketnoun

Any hollow place suggestive of a pocket in form or use;

Voidnoun

the state of nonexistence

Pocketnoun

A bag or pouch; especially; a small bag inserted in a garment for carrying small articles, particularly money; hence, figuratively, money; wealth.

Voidnoun

an empty area or space;

‘the huge desert voids’; ‘the emptiness of outer space’; ‘without their support he'll be ruling in a vacuum’;

Pocketnoun

One of several bags attached to a billiard table, into which the balls are driven.

Voidverb

declare invalid;

‘The contract was annulled’; ‘void a plea’;

Pocketnoun

A large bag or sack used in packing various articles, as ginger, hops, cowries, etc.

Voidverb

clear (a room, house, place) of occupants or empty or clear (a place, receptacle, etc.) of something;

‘The chemist voided the glass bottle’; ‘The concert hall was voided of the audience’;

Pocketnoun

A hole or space covered by a movable piece of board, as in a floor, boxing, partitions, or the like.

Voidverb

take away the legal force of or render ineffective;

‘invalidateas a contract’;

Pocketnoun

A cavity in a rock containing a nugget of gold, or other mineral; a small body of ore contained in such a cavity.

Voidverb

excrete or discharge from the body

Pocketnoun

A strip of canvas, sewn upon a sail so that a batten or a light spar can placed in the interspace.

Voidadjective

lacking any legal or binding force;

‘null and void’;

Pocketnoun

Same as Pouch.

Voidadjective

containing nothing;

‘the earth was without form, and void’;

Pocketnoun

Any hollow place suggestive of a pocket in form or use;

Pocketnoun

An isolated group or area which has properties in contrast to the surrounding area; as, a pocket of poverty in an affluent region; pockets of resistance in a conquered territory; a pocket of unemployment in a booming ecomony.

Pocketnoun

The area from which a quarterback throws a pass, behind the line of scrimmage, delineated by the defensive players of his own team who protect him from attacking opponents; as, he had ample time in the pocket to choose an open receiver.

Pocketnoun

The part of a baseball glove covering the palm of the wearer's hand.

Pocketnoun

the space between the head pin and one of the pins in the second row, considered as the optimal point at which to aim the bowling ball in order to get a strike.

Pocketverb

To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change.

‘He would pocket the expense of the license.’;

Pocketverb

To take clandestinely or fraudulently.

‘He pocketed pay in the names of men who had long been dead.’;

Pocketnoun

a small pouch inside a garment for carrying small articles

Pocketnoun

an enclosed space;

‘the trapped miners found a pocket of air’;

Pocketnoun

a supply of money;

‘they dipped into the taxpayers' pockets’;

Pocketnoun

(bowling) the space between the headpin and the pins next bnehind it on the right or left;

‘the ball hit the pocket and gave him a perfect strike’;

Pocketnoun

a hollow concave shape made by removing something

Pocketnoun

a local region of low pressure or descending air that causes a plane to lose height suddenly

Pocketnoun

a small isolated group of people;

‘they were concentrated in pockets inside the city’; ‘the battle was won except for cleaning up pockets of resistance’;

Pocketnoun

(anatomy) saclike structure in any of various animals (as a marsupial or gopher or pelican)

Pocketnoun

an opening at the corner or on the side of a billiard table into which billiard balls are struck

Pocketverb

put in one's pocket;

‘He pocketed the change’;

Pocketverb

take unlawfully

Pocket

A pocket is a bag- or envelope-like receptacle either fastened to or inserted in an article of clothing to hold small items. Pockets are also attached to luggage, backpacks, and similar items.

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