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Trident vs. Fork

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Tridentnoun

A three-pronged spear somewhat resembling a pitchfork.

‘Poseidon's trident’;

Forknoun

A pronged tool having a long straight handle, used for digging, lifting, throwing etc.

Tridentnoun

(geometry) A curve of third order of the form:

Forknoun

A pronged tool for use in the garden; a smaller hand fork for weeding etc., or larger for turning over the soil.

Tridentnoun

A kind of scepter or spear with three prongs, - the common attribute of Neptune.

Forknoun

(obsolete) A gallows.

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Tridentnoun

A three-pronged spear or goad, used for urging horses; also, the weapon used by one class of gladiators.

Forknoun

A utensil with spikes used to put solid food into the mouth, or to hold food down while cutting.

Tridentnoun

A three-pronged fish spear.

Forknoun

A tuning fork.

Tridentnoun

A curve of third order, having three infinite branches in one direction and a fourth infinite branch in the opposite direction.

Forknoun

An intersection in a road or path where one road is split into two.

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Tridentadjective

Having three teeth or prongs; tridentate.

Forknoun

One of the parts into which anything is furcated or divided; a prong; a branch of a stream, a road, etc.; a barbed point, as of an arrow.

Tridentnoun

a spear with three prongs

Forknoun

A point where a waterway, such as a river, splits and goes two (or more) different directions.

Tridentnoun

a three-pronged spear, especially as an attribute of Poseidon (Neptune) or Britannia.

Forknoun

(geography) Used in the names of some river tributaries, e.g. West Fork White River and East Fork White River, joining together to form the White River of Indiana

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Tridentnoun

a US design of submarine-launched long-range ballistic missile.

Forknoun

(figuratively) A point in time where one has to make a decision between two life paths.

Trident

A trident is a three-pronged spear. It is used for spear fishing and historically as a polearm.

Forknoun

(chess) The simultaneous attack of two adversary pieces with one single attacking piece (especially a knight).

Forknoun

(computer science) A splitting-up of an existing process into itself and a child process executing parts of the same program.

Forknoun

(software) An event where development of some free software or open-source software is split into two or more separate projects.

Forknoun

(software) The, or one of the, software project(s) that underwent changes in such an event; a software project split off from a main project.

‘LibreOffice is a fork of OpenOffice.’;

Forknoun

A split in a blockchain resulting from protocol disagreements, or a branch of the blockchain resulting from such a split.

Forknoun

(British) Crotch.

Forknoun

(colloquial) A forklift.

‘Are you qualified to drive a fork?’;

Forknoun

The individual blades of a forklift.

Forknoun

(cycling) In a bicycle, the portion of the frameset holding the front wheel, allowing the rider to steer and balance.

‘The fork can be equipped with a suspension on mountain bikes.’;

Forkverb

(ambitransitive) To divide into two or more branches.

‘A road, a tree, or a stream forks.’;

Forkverb

(transitive) To move with a fork (as hay or food).

Forkverb

(computer science) To spawn a new child process in some sense duplicating the existing process.

Forkverb

(computer science) To split a (software) project into several projects.

Forkverb

(computer science) To split a (software) distributed version control repository

Forkverb

(British) To kick someone in the crotch.

Forkverb

To shoot into blades, as corn does.

Forknoun

An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; - used for piercing, holding, taking up, or pitching anything.

Forknoun

Anything furcate or like a fork in shape, or furcate at the extremity; as, a tuning fork.

Forknoun

One of the parts into which anything is furcated or divided; a prong; a branch of a stream, a road, etc.; a barbed point, as of an arrow.

‘Let it fall . . . though the fork invadeThe region of my heart.’; ‘A thunderbolt with three forks.’;

Forknoun

The place where a division or a union occurs; the angle or opening between two branches or limbs; as, the fork of a river, a tree, or a road.

Forknoun

The gibbet.

Forkverb

To shoot into blades, as corn.

‘The corn beginneth to fork.’;

Forkverb

To divide into two or more branches; as, a road, a tree, or a stream forks.

Forkverb

To raise, or pitch with a fork, as hay; to dig or turn over with a fork, as the soil.

‘Forking the sheaves on the high-laden cart.’;

Forknoun

cutlery used for serving and eating food

Forknoun

the act of branching out or dividing into branches

Forknoun

a part of a forked or branching shape;

‘he broke off one of the branches’; ‘they took the south fork’;

Forknoun

an agricultural tool used for lifting or digging; has a handle and metal prongs

Forknoun

the angle formed by the inner sides of the legs where they join the human trunk

Forkverb

lift with a pitchfork;

‘pitchfork hay’;

Forkverb

place under attack with one's own pieces, of two enemy pieces

Forkverb

divide into two or more branches so as to form a fork;

‘The road forks’;

Forkverb

shape like a fork;

‘She forked her fingers’;

Fork

In cutlery or kitchenware, a fork (from Latin: furca 'pitchfork') is a utensil, now usually made of metal, whose long handle terminates in a head that branches into several narrow and often slightly curved tines with which one can spear foods either to hold them to cut with a knife or to lift them to the mouth.

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