VS.

Trial vs. Trail

Published:
Views: 6,778

Trialnoun

An opportunity to test something out; a test.

‘They will perform the trials for the new equipment next week.’;

Trailverb

(transitive) To follow behind (someone or something); to tail (someone or something).

‘The hunters trailed their prey deep into the woods.’;

Trialnoun

Appearance at judicial court in order to be examined.

Trailverb

(transitive) To drag (something) behind on the ground.

‘You'll get your coat all muddy if you trail it around like that.’;

Trialnoun

A difficult or annoying experience.

‘That boy was a trial to his parents.’;

Trailverb

(transitive) To leave (a trail of).

‘He walked into the house, soaking wet, and trailed water all over the place.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Trialnoun

A tryout to pick members of a team.

‘soccer trials’;

Trailverb

(transitive) To show a trailer of (a film, TV show etc.); to release or publish a preview of (a report etc.) in advance of the full publication.

‘His new film was trailed on TV last night.’; ‘There were no surprises in this morning's much-trailed budget statement.’;

Trialnoun

(ceramics) A piece of ware used to test the heat of a kiln.

Trailverb

(intransitive) To hang or drag loosely behind; to move with a slow sweeping motion.

‘The bride's long dress trailed behind her as she walked down the aisle.’;

Trialnoun

(UK) An internal examination set by Eton College.

Trailverb

(intransitive) To run or climb like certain plants.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trialadjective

Pertaining to a trial or test.

Trailverb

(intransitive) To drag oneself lazily or reluctantly along.

‘Our parents marched to church and we trailed behind.’;

Trialadjective

Attempted on a provisional or experimental basis.

Trailverb

To be losing, to be behind in a competition.

Trialadjective

Characterized by having three (usually equivalent) components.

Trailverb

(military) To carry (a firearm) with the breech near the ground and the upper part inclined forward, the piece being held by the right hand near the middle.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trialadjective

Triple.

Trailverb

To flatten (grass, etc.) by walking through it; to tread down.

Trialadjective

(grammar) Pertaining to a language form referring to three of something, like people; contrast singular, dual and plural. (See Ambai language for an example.)

‘No language has a trial number unless it has a dual.’;

Trailverb

(dated) To take advantage of the ignorance of; to impose upon.

Trialverb

To carry out a series of tests on (a new product, procedure etc.) before marketing or implementing it.

‘The warning system was extensively trialed before being fitted to all our vehicles.’;

Trailnoun

The track or indication marking the route followed by something that has passed, such as the footprints of animal on land or the contrail of an airplane in the sky.

Trialverb

To try out (a new player) in a sports team.

‘The team trialled a new young goalkeeper in Saturday's match, with mixed results.’;

Trailnoun

A route for travel over land, especially a narrow, unpaved pathway for use by hikers, horseback riders, etc.

Trialnoun

The act of trying or testing in any manner.

Trailnoun

A trailer broadcast on television for a forthcoming film or programme.

Trialnoun

Any effort or exertion of strength for the purpose of ascertaining what can be done or effected.

‘[I] defy thee to the trial of mortal fight.’;

Trailnoun

(graph theory) A walk in which all the edges are distinct.

Trialnoun

The state of being tried or tempted; exposure to suffering that tests strength, patience, faith, or the like; affliction or temptation that exercises and proves the graces or virtues of men.

‘Others had trial of cruel mockings and scourgings.’;

Trailverb

To hunt by the track; to track.

Trialnoun

The act of testing by experience; proof; test.

‘Repeated trials of the issues and events of actions.’;

Trailverb

To draw or drag, as along the ground.

‘And hung his head, and trailed his legs along.’; ‘They shall not trail me through their streetsLike a wild beast.’; ‘Long behind he trails his pompous robe.’;

Trialnoun

That which tries or afflicts; that which harasses; that which tries the character or principles; that which tempts to evil; as, his child's conduct was a sore trial.

‘Every station is exposed to some trials.’;

Trailverb

To carry, as a firearm, with the breech near the ground and the upper part inclined forward, the piece being held by the right hand near the middle.

Trialnoun

Examination by a test; experiment, as in chemistry, metallurgy, etc.

Trailverb

To tread down, as grass, by walking through it; to lay flat.

Trialnoun

The formal examination of the matter in issue in a cause before a competent tribunal; the mode of determining a question of fact in a court of law; the examination, in legal form, of the facts in issue in a cause pending before a competent tribunal, for the purpose of determining such issue.

Trailverb

To take advantage of the ignorance of; to impose upon.

‘I presently perceived she was (what is vernacularly termed) trailing Mrs. Dent; that is, playing on her ignorance.’;

Trialnoun

(law) legal proceedings consisting of the judicial examination of issues by a competent tribunal;

‘most of these complaints are settled before they go to trial’;

Trailverb

To be drawn out in length; to follow after.

‘When his brother saw the red blood trail.’;

Trialnoun

the act of testing something;

‘in the experimental trials the amount of carbon was measured separately’; ‘he called each flip of the coin a new trial’;

Trailverb

To grow to great length, especially when slender and creeping upon the ground, as a plant; to run or climb.

Trialnoun

(sports) a preliminary competition to determine qualifications;

‘the trials for the semifinals began yesterday’;

Trailnoun

A track left by man or beast; a track followed by the hunter; a scent on the ground by the animal pursued; as, a deer trail.

‘They traveled in the bed of the brook, leaving no dangerous trail.’; ‘How cheerfully on the false trail they cry!’;

Trialnoun

(law) the determination of a person's innocence or guilt by due process of law;

‘he had a fair trial and the jury found him guilty’;

Trailnoun

A footpath or road track through a wilderness or wild region; as, an Indian trail over the plains.

Trialnoun

trying something to find out about it;

‘a sample for ten days free trial’; ‘a trial of progesterone failed to relieve the pain’;

Trailnoun

Anything drawn out to a length; as, the trail of a meteor; a trail of smoke.

‘When lightning shoots in glittering trails along.’;

Trialnoun

an annoying or frustrating or catastrophic event;

‘his mother-in-law's visits were a great trial for him’; ‘life is full of tribulations’; ‘a visitation of the plague’;

Trailnoun

Anything drawn behind in long undulations; a train.

Trialnoun

the act of undergoing testing;

‘he survived the great test of battle’; ‘candidates must compete in a trial of skill’;

Trailnoun

Anything drawn along, as a vehicle.

Trialnoun

a formal examination of evidence by a judge, typically before a jury, in order to decide guilt in a case of criminal or civil proceedings

‘the editor was summoned to stand trial for libel’; ‘the newspaper accounts of the trial’;

Trailnoun

A frame for trailing plants; a trellis.

Trialnoun

a test of the performance, qualities, or suitability of someone or something

‘clinical trials must establish whether the new hip replacements are working’;

Trailnoun

The entrails of a fowl, especially of game, as the woodcock, and the like; - applied also, sometimes, to the entrails of sheep.

‘The woodcock is a favorite with epicures, and served with its trail in, is a delicious dish.’;

Trialnoun

a sports match to test the ability of players eligible for selection to a team

‘he cracked his ankle the week before the final trial’;

Trailnoun

That part of the stock of a gun carriage which rests on the ground when the piece is unlimbered. See Illust. of Gun carriage, under Gun.

Trialnoun

a test of individual ability on a motorcycle over rough ground or on a road.

Trailnoun

The act of taking advantage of the ignorance of a person; an imposition.

Trialnoun

an event in which horses, dogs, or other animals compete or perform

‘horse trials’;

Trailnoun

a track or mark left by something that has passed;

‘there as a trail of blood’; ‘a tear left its trail on her cheek’;

Trialnoun

a person, experience, or situation that tests a person's endurance or forbearance

‘the trials and tribulations of married life’;

Trailnoun

a path or track roughly blazed through wild or hilly country

Trialverb

test (something, especially a new product) to assess its suitability or performance

‘teachers all over the UK are trialling the materials’;

Trailnoun

evidence pointing to a possible solution;

‘the police are following a promising lead’; ‘the trail led straight to the perpetrator’;

Trialverb

(of a horse, dog, or other animal) compete in trials

‘the pup trialled on Saturday’;

Trailverb

to lag or linger behind;

‘But in so many other areas we still are dragging’;

Trial

In law, a trial is a coming together of parties to a dispute, to present information (in the form of evidence) in a tribunal, a formal setting with the authority to adjudicate claims or disputes. One form of tribunal is a court.

Trailverb

go after with the intent to catch;

‘The policeman chased the mugger down the alley’; ‘the dog chased the rabbit’;

Trailverb

move, proceed, or walk draggingly pr slowly;

‘John trailed behind behis class mates’; ‘The Mercedes trailed behind the horse cart’;

Trailverb

hang down so as to drag along the ground;

‘The bride's veiled trailed along the ground’;

Trailverb

drag loosely along a surface; allow to sweep the ground;

‘The toddler was trailing his pants’; ‘She trained her long scarf behind her’;

Trail

A trail is usually a path, track or unpaved lane or road. In the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, path or footpath is the preferred term for a walking trail.

Trial Illustrations

Trail Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons