Touch vs. Base - What's the difference?

Wiktionary

  • Touch (verb)

    Primarily physical senses.

  • Touch (verb)

    To make physical contact with; to bring the hand, finger or other part of the body into contact with. from 14th c.

    "I touched her l|en|face softly."

  • Touch (verb)

    To come into (involuntary) contact with; to meet or intersect. from 14th c.

    "Sitting on the l|en|bench, the l|en|hem of her l|en|skirt touched the ground."

  • Touch (verb)

    To come into physical contact, or to be in physical contact. from 14th c.

    "They l|en|stood l|en|next to each other, their shoulders touching."

  • Touch (verb)

    To make physical contact with a thing. from 14th c.

    "Please can I have a l|en|look, if I promise not to touch?"

  • Touch (verb)

    To physically disturb; to interfere with, molest, or attempt to harm through contact. from 14th c.

    "If you touch her, I'll kill you."

  • Touch (verb)

    To cause to be briefly in contact with something.

    "He quickly touched his knee to the worn marble."

    "The demonstrator nearly touched the rod on the ball."

  • Touch (verb)

    To physically affect in specific ways implied by context. from 15th c.

    "Frankly, this l|en|wood's so l|en|strong that sandpaper won't touch it."

  • Touch (verb)

    To consume, or otherwise use. from 15th c.

    "Are you all l|en|right? You've hardly touched your lunch."

  • Touch (verb)

    Of a ship or its passengers: to land, to make a short stop (at). from 16th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To lay hands on (someone suffering from scrofula) as a form of cure, as formerly practised by English and French monarchs. from 17th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To sexually excite with the fingers; to finger or masturbate. from 20th c.

    "Her parents had l|en|caught her touching herself when she was fifteen."

  • Touch (verb)

    To fasten; to take effect; to make impression.

  • Touch (verb)

    To bring (a sail) so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.

  • Touch (verb)

    To be brought, as a sail, so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.

  • Touch (verb)

    Primarily non-physical senses.

  • Touch (verb)

    To keep the ship as near (the wind) as possible.

    "to touch the wind"

  • Touch (verb)

    To imbue or endow with a specific quality. from 14th c.

    "My grandfather, as many people know, was touched with greatness."

  • Touch (verb)

    To deal with in speech or writing; to mention briefly, to allude to. from 14th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To deal with in speech or writing; briefly to speak or write (on or upon something). from 14th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To concern, to have to do with. 14th-19th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To affect emotionally; to bring about tender or painful feelings in. from 14th c.

    "Stefan was touched by the song's message of hope."

  • Touch (verb)

    To affect in a negative way, especially only slightly. from 16th c.

    "He had been drinking over lunch, and was clearly touched."

  • Touch (verb)

    To give royal assent to by touching it with the sceptre. from 17th c.

    "The bill was finally touched after many hours of deliberation."

  • Touch (verb)

    To obtain money from, usually by borrowing (from a friend). from 18th c.

    "I was running short, so I touched old Bertie for a fiver."

  • Touch (verb)

    To disturb the mental functions of; to make somewhat insane; often followed with "in the head". from 18th c.

    "You must be touched if you think I'm taking your advice."

  • Touch (verb)

    To be on the level of; to approach in excellence or quality. from 19th c.

  • Touch (verb)

    To come close to; to approach.

  • Touch (verb)

    To try; to prove, as with a touchstone.

  • Touch (verb)

    To mark or delineate with touches; to add a slight stroke to with the pencil or brush.

  • Touch (verb)

    To infect; to affect slightly.

  • Touch (verb)

    To strike; to manipulate; to play on.

    "to touch an instrument of music"

  • Touch (verb)

    To perform, as a tune; to play.

  • Touch (verb)

    To influence by impulse; to impel forcibly.

  • Touch (noun)

    An act of touching, especially with the hand or finger.

    "Suddenly, in the crowd, I felt a touch at my shoulder."

  • Touch (noun)

    The faculty or sense of perception by physical contact.

    "With the lights out, she had to rely on touch to find her desk."

  • Touch (noun)

    The style or technique with which one plays a musical instrument.

    "He performed one of Ravel's piano concertos with a wonderfully light and playful touch."

  • Touch (noun)

    A distinguishing feature or characteristic.

    "Clever touches like this are what make her such a brilliant writer."

  • Touch (noun)

    A little bit; a small amount.

    "Move it left just a touch and it will be perfect."

  • Touch (noun)

    The part of a sports field beyond the touchlines or goal-lines.

    "He got the ball, and kicked it straight out into touch."

  • Touch (noun)

    A relationship of close communication or understanding.

    "He promised to keep in touch while he was away."

  • Touch (noun)

    The ability to perform a task well; aptitude.

    "I used to be a great chess player but I've lost my touch."

  • Touch (noun)

    Act or power of exciting emotion.

  • Touch (noun)

    An emotion or affection.

  • Touch (noun)

    Personal reference or application.

  • Touch (noun)

    A single stroke on a drawing or a picture.

  • Touch (noun)

    A brief essay.

  • Touch (noun)

    A touchstone; hence, stone of the sort used for touchstone.

  • Touch (noun)

    Examination or trial by some decisive standard; test; proof; tried quality.

  • Touch (noun)

    The particular or characteristic mode of action, or the resistance of the keys of an instrument to the fingers.

    "a heavy touch, or a light touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    The broadest part of a plank worked top and but, or of one worked anchor-stock fashion (that is, tapered from the middle to both ends); also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.

  • Touch (noun)

    The children's game of tag.

  • Touch (noun)

    A set of changes less than the total possible on seven bells, i.e. less than 5,040.

  • Touch (noun)

    An act of borrowing or stealing something.

  • Touch (noun)

    tallow

  • Base (noun)

    Something from which other things extend; a foundation.

  • Base (noun)

    The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.

  • Base (noun)

    A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.

  • Base (noun)

    The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.

  • Base (noun)

    A basic but essential component or ingredient.

  • Base (noun)

    A substance used as a mordant in dyeing.

  • Base (noun)

    Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.

  • Base (noun)

    Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.

  • Base (noun)

    Important areas in games and sports.

  • Base (noun)

    A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.

  • Base (noun)

    A safe zone in the children's games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.

  • Base (noun)

    The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.

  • Base (noun)

    A nucleotide's nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.

  • Base (noun)

    The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.

  • Base (noun)

    The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).

  • Base (noun)

    The lowest side of a in a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.

  • Base (noun)

    The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.

  • Base (noun)

    The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.

  • Base (noun)

    A number raised to the power of an exponent.

    "The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3."

  • Base (noun)

    synonym of radix.

  • Base (noun)

    The set of sets from which a topology is generated.

  • Base (noun)

    A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.

  • Base (noun)

    In hand-to-hand balance, the person who supports the flyer; the person that remains in contact with the ground.

  • Base (noun)

    A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.

  • Base (noun)

    dated form of bass

  • Base (noun)

    The smallest kind of cannon.

  • Base (noun)

    The housing of a horse.

  • Base (noun)

    A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.

  • Base (noun)

    The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

  • Base (noun)

    An apron.

  • Base (noun)

    A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

  • Base (noun)

    The game of prisoners' bars. from 15th c.

  • Base (verb)

    To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.

  • Base (verb)

    To be located (at a particular place).

  • Base (verb)

    To act as a base; to be the person supporting the flyer.

  • Base (adjective)

    Low in height; short.

  • Base (adjective)

    Low in place or position.

  • Base (adjective)

    Of low value or degree.

  • Base (adjective)

    Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.

  • Base (adjective)

    Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.

  • Base (adjective)

    Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.

  • Base (adjective)

    Designating those metals which are not classed as precious or noble.

  • Base (adjective)

    Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.

    "base coin"

    "base bullion"

  • Base (adjective)

    Of illegitimate birth; bastard.

  • Base (adjective)

    Not classical or correct.

    "base Latin"

  • Base (adjective)

    obsolete form of bass

    "the base tone of a violin"

  • Base (adjective)

    Not held by honourable service.

    "A base estate is one held by services not honourable, or held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant is a base tenant."

Oxford Dictionary

  • Touch (verb)

    come into or be in contact with

    "he leaned back so that only two legs of his chair touched the floor"

  • Touch (verb)

    bring one's hand or another part of one's body into contact with

    "he touched a strand of her hair"

    "Andrew touched him on the shoulder"

  • Touch (verb)

    come or bring into mutual contact

    "we touched wheels and nearly came off the road"

    "for a moment their fingers touched"

  • Touch (verb)

    strike (a ball) lightly in a specified direction

    "he touched back a cross-field ball"

  • Touch (verb)

    be tangent to (a curve or surface) at a certain point.

  • Touch (verb)

    handle in order to interfere with, alter, or otherwise affect

    "I didn't play her records or touch any of her stuff"

  • Touch (verb)

    cause harm to (someone)

    "I've got friends who'll pull strings—nobody will dare touch me"

  • Touch (verb)

    consume or use (food, drink, money, etc.)

    "in three years I haven't touched a cent of the money"

    "the pint by his right hand was hardly touched"

  • Touch (verb)

    used to indicate that something is avoided or rejected

    "he was good only for the jobs that nobody else would touch"

  • Touch (verb)

    affect or concern

    "a tenth of state companies have been touched by privatization"

  • Touch (verb)

    (of a quality or expression) be or become visible or apparent in

    "the voice was touched by hysteria"

    "a wry smile touched his lips"

  • Touch (verb)

    produce feelings of affection, gratitude, or sympathy in

    "she was touched by her friend's loyalty"

  • Touch (verb)

    reach (a specified level or amount)

    "sales touched twenty grand last year"

  • Touch (verb)

    be comparable to in quality or excellence

    "there's no one who can touch him at lightweight judo"

  • Touch (verb)

    ask someone for (money or some other commodity) as a loan or gift

    "he touched me for his fare"

  • Touch (verb)

    lightly mark in features or other details with a brush or pencil.

  • Touch (noun)

    an act of touching someone or something

    "her touch on his shoulder was hesitant"

    "manipulate images on the screen at the touch of a key"

    "expressions of love through words and touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    the faculty of perception through physical contact, especially with the fingers

    "reading by touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    a musician's manner of playing keys or strings.

  • Touch (noun)

    the manner in which a musical instrument's keys or strings respond to being played

    "Viennese instruments with their too delicate touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    a light stroke with a pen, pencil, etc.

  • Touch (noun)

    a small amount; a trace

    "he retired to bed with a touch of flu"

    "add a touch of vinegar"

  • Touch (noun)

    a small distinctive detail or feature

    "the film's most inventive touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    a distinctive manner or method of dealing with something

    "later he showed a surer political touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    an ability to deal with something successfully

    "getting caught looks so incompetent, as though we're losing our touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    the area beyond the sidelines, out of play

    "the idea was kicked firmly into touch by the authorities"

    "his clearance went directly into touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    an act of asking for and getting a loan or gift from someone

    "I only tolerated him because he was good for a touch now and then"

  • Touch (noun)

    a series of changes shorter than a peal.

  • Touch (noun)

    a thing that tests the worth or character of something

    "you must put your fate to the touch"

  • Base (noun)

    the lowest part or edge of something, especially the part on which it rests or is supported

    "she sat down at the base of a tree"

  • Base (noun)

    the part of a column between the shaft and pedestal or pavement.

  • Base (noun)

    the end at which a part or organ is attached to the trunk or main part

    "a shoot is produced at the base of the stem"

  • Base (noun)

    a line or surface on which a figure is regarded as standing

    "the base of the triangle"

  • Base (noun)

    a known line used as a geometrical base for trigonometry.

  • Base (noun)

    the lowest part of a shield.

  • Base (noun)

    a conceptual structure or entity on which something draws or depends

    "the town's economic base collapsed"

  • Base (noun)

    a foundation or starting point for further work

    "she uses existing data as the base for the study"

  • Base (noun)

    a group of people regarded as supporting an organization, for example by buying its products

    "a customer base"

  • Base (noun)

    a place used as a centre of operations by the armed forces or others; a headquarters

    "he headed back to base"

  • Base (noun)

    the main place where a person works or stays

    "she makes the studio her base"

    "your hotel is a good base from which to explore"

  • Base (noun)

    a main or important element or ingredient to which other things are added

    "soaps with a vegetable oil base"

  • Base (noun)

    a substance into which a pigment is mixed to form paint, such as water, oil, or powdered aluminium hydroxide.

  • Base (noun)

    a substance used as a foundation for make-up

    "her make-up artist works with base, eye make-up, and lipstick"

  • Base (noun)

    a substance capable of reacting with an acid to form a salt and water, or (more broadly) of accepting or neutralizing hydrogen ions.

  • Base (noun)

    a purine or pyrimidine group in a nucleotide or nucleic acid.

  • Base (noun)

    the middle part of a bipolar transistor, separating the emitter from the collector.

  • Base (noun)

    the root or stem of a word or a derivative.

  • Base (noun)

    the uninflected form of a verb.

  • Base (noun)

    a number used as the basis of a numeration scale.

  • Base (noun)

    a number in terms of which other numbers are expressed as logarithms.

  • Base (noun)

    each of the four stations that must be reached in turn to score a run.

  • Base (verb)

    use (something specified) as the foundation or starting point for something

    "entitlement will be based on income"

    "the film is based on a novel by Pat Conroy"

  • Base (verb)

    situate at a specified place as the centre of operations

    "a London-based band"

    "the Science Policy Review Unit is based at the University of Sussex"

  • Base (adjective)

    without moral principles; ignoble

    "the electorate's baser instincts of greed and selfishness"

  • Base (adjective)

    denoting or befitting a person of low social class.

  • Base (adjective)

    (of coins or other articles) not made of precious metal

    "the basest coins in the purse were made in the 620s AD"

Webster Dictionary

  • Touch

    To come in contact with; to hit or strike lightly against; to extend the hand, foot, or the like, so as to reach or rest on.

  • Touch

    To perceive by the sense of feeling.

  • Touch

    To come to; to reach; to attain to.

  • Touch

    To try; to prove, as with a touchstone.

  • Touch

    To relate to; to concern; to affect.

  • Touch

    To handle, speak of, or deal with; to treat of.

  • Touch

    To meddle or interfere with; as, I have not touched the books.

  • Touch

    To affect the senses or the sensibility of; to move; to melt; to soften; especially, to cause feelings of pity, compassion, sympathy, or gratitude in.

  • Touch

    To mark or delineate with touches; to add a slight stroke to with the pencil or brush.

  • Touch

    To infect; to affect slightly.

  • Touch

    To make an impression on; to have effect upon.

  • Touch

    To strike; to manipulate; to play on; as, to touch an instrument of music.

  • Touch

    To perform, as a tune; to play.

  • Touch

    To influence by impulse; to impel forcibly.

  • Touch

    To harm, afflict, or distress.

  • Touch

    To affect with insanity, especially in a slight degree; to make partially insane; - rarely used except in the past participle.

  • Touch

    To be tangent to. See Tangent, a.

  • Touch

    To lay a hand upon for curing disease.

  • Touch

    To compare with; to be equal to; - usually with a negative; as, he held that for good cheer nothing could touch an open fire.

  • Touch

    To induce to give or lend; to borrow from; as, to touch one for a loan; hence, to steal from.

  • Touch (verb)

    To be in contact; to be in a state of junction, so that no space is between; as, two spheres touch only at points.

  • Touch (verb)

    To fasten; to take effect; to make impression.

  • Touch (verb)

    To treat anything in discourse, especially in a slight or casual manner; - often with on or upon.

  • Touch (verb)

    To be brought, as a sail, so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.

  • Touch (noun)

    The act of touching, or the state of being touched; contact.

  • Touch (noun)

    The sense by which pressure or traction exerted on the skin is recognized; the sense by which the properties of bodies are determined by contact; the tactile sense. See Tactile sense, under Tactile.

  • Touch (noun)

    Act or power of exciting emotion.

  • Touch (noun)

    An emotion or affection.

  • Touch (noun)

    Personal reference or application.

  • Touch (noun)

    A stroke; as, a touch of raillery; a satiric touch; hence, animadversion; censure; reproof.

  • Touch (noun)

    A single stroke on a drawing or a picture.

  • Touch (noun)

    Feature; lineament; trait.

  • Touch (noun)

    The act of the hand on a musical instrument; bence, in the plural, musical notes.

  • Touch (noun)

    A small quantity intermixed; a little; a dash.

  • Touch (noun)

    A hint; a suggestion; slight notice.

  • Touch (noun)

    A slight and brief essay.

  • Touch (noun)

    A touchstone; hence, stone of the sort used for touchstone.

  • Touch (noun)

    Hence, examination or trial by some decisive standard; test; proof; tried quality.

  • Touch (noun)

    The particular or characteristic mode of action, or the resistance of the keys of an instrument to the fingers; as, a heavy touch, or a light touch; also, the manner of touching, striking, or pressing the keys of a piano; as, a legato touch; a staccato touch.

  • Touch (noun)

    The broadest part of a plank worked top and but (see Top and but, under Top, n.), or of one worked anchor-stock fashion (that is, tapered from the middle to both ends); also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.

  • Touch (noun)

    That part of the field which is beyond the line of flags on either side.

  • Touch (noun)

    A boys' game; tag.

  • Touch (noun)

    A set of changes less than the total possible on seven bells, that is, less than 5,040.

  • Touch (noun)

    An act of borrowing or stealing.

  • Touch (noun)

    Tallow; - a plumber's term.

  • Base (adjective)

    Of little, or less than the usual, height; of low growth; as, base shrubs.

  • Base (adjective)

    Low in place or position.

  • Base (adjective)

    Of humble birth; or low degree; lowly; mean.

  • Base (adjective)

    Illegitimate by birth; bastard.

  • Base (adjective)

    Of little comparative value, as metal inferior to gold and silver, the precious metals.

  • Base (adjective)

    Alloyed with inferior metal; debased; as, base coin; base bullion.

  • Base (adjective)

    Morally low. Hence: Low-minded; unworthy; without dignity of sentiment; ignoble; mean; illiberal; menial; as, a base fellow; base motives; base occupations.

  • Base (adjective)

    Not classical or correct.

  • Base (adjective)

    Deep or grave in sound; as, the base tone of a violin.

  • Base (adjective)

    Not held by honorable service; as, a base estate, one held by services not honorable; held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant.

  • Base (noun)

    The bottom of anything, considered as its support, or that on which something rests for support; the foundation; as, the base of a statue.

  • Base (noun)

    Fig.: The fundamental or essential part of a thing; the essential principle; a groundwork.

  • Base (noun)

    The lower part of a wall, pier, or column, when treated as a separate feature, usually in projection, or especially ornamented.

  • Base (noun)

    That extremity of a leaf, fruit, etc., at which it is attached to its support.

  • Base (noun)

    The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the latter and forms a salt; - applied also to the hydroxides of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain organic bodies resembling them in their property of forming salts with acids.

  • Base (noun)

    The chief ingredient in a compound.

  • Base (noun)

    A substance used as a mordant.

  • Base (noun)

    The exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two adjacent bastions.

  • Base (noun)

    The line or surface constituting that part of a figure on which it is supposed to stand.

  • Base (noun)

    The number from which a mathematical table is constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.

  • Base (noun)

    A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.) (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice. (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.

  • Base (noun)

    A place or tract of country, protected by fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the operations of an army proceed, forward movements are made, supplies are furnished, etc.

  • Base (noun)

    The smallest kind of cannon.

  • Base (noun)

    That part of an organ by which it is attached to another more central organ.

  • Base (noun)

    The basal plane of a crystal.

  • Base (noun)

    The ground mass of a rock, especially if not distinctly crystalline.

  • Base (noun)

    The lower part of the field. See Escutcheon.

  • Base (noun)

    The housing of a horse.

  • Base (noun)

    A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.

  • Base (noun)

    The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

  • Base (noun)

    An apron.

  • Base (noun)

    The point or line from which a start is made; a starting place or a goal in various games.

  • Base (noun)

    A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

  • Base (noun)

    A rustic play; - called also prisoner's base, prison base, or bars.

  • Base (noun)

    Any one of the four bounds which mark the circuit of the infield.

  • Base

    To put on a base or basis; to lay the foundation of; to found, as an argument or conclusion; - used with on or upon.

  • Base

    To abase; to let, or cast, down; to lower.

  • Base

    To reduce the value of; to debase.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Touch (noun)

    the event of something coming in contact with the body;

    "he longed for the touch of her hand"

    "the cooling touch of the night air"

  • Touch (noun)

    the faculty of touch;

    "only sight and touch enable us to locate objects in the space around us"

  • Touch (noun)

    a suggestion of some quality;

    "there was a touch of sarcasm in his tone"

    "he detected a ghost of a smile on her face"

  • Touch (noun)

    a distinguishing style;

    "this room needs a woman's touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    the act of putting two things together with no space between them;

    "at his touch the room filled with lights"

  • Touch (noun)

    a slight but appreciable addition;

    "this dish could use a touch of garlic"

  • Touch (noun)

    a communicative interaction;

    "the pilot made contact with the base"

    "he got in touch with his colleagues"

  • Touch (noun)

    a slight attack of illness;

    "he has a touch of rheumatism"

  • Touch (noun)

    the act of soliciting money (as a gift or loan);

    "he watched the beggar trying to make a touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    the sensation produced by pressure receptors in the skin;

    "she likes the touch of silk on her skin"

    "the surface had a greasy feeling"

  • Touch (noun)

    deftness in handling matters;

    "he has a master's touch"

  • Touch (noun)

    the feel of mechanical action;

    "this piano has a wonderful touch"

  • Touch (verb)

    make physical contact with, come in contact with;

    "Touch the stone for good luck"

    "She never touched her husband"

  • Touch (verb)

    perceive via the tactile sense;

    "Helen Keller felt the physical world by touching people and objects around her"

  • Touch (verb)

    affect emotionally;

    "A stirring movie"

    "I was touched by your kind letter of sympathy"

  • Touch (verb)

    have to do with or be relevant to;

    "There were lots of questions referring to her talk"

    "My remark pertained to your earlier comments"

  • Touch (verb)

    be in direct physical contact with; make contact;

    "The two buildings touch"

    "Their hands touched"

    "The wire must not contact the metal cover"

    "The surfaces contact at this point"

  • Touch (verb)

    have an effect upon;

    "Will the new rules affect me?"

  • Touch (verb)

    deal with; usually used with a form of negation;

    "I wouldn't touch her with a ten-foot pole"

    "The local Mafia won't touch gambling"

  • Touch (verb)

    cause to be in brief contact with;

    "He touched his toes to the horse's flanks"

  • Touch (verb)

    to extend as far as;

    "The sunlight reached the wall"

    "Can he reach?"

    "The chair must not touch the wall"

  • Touch (verb)

    be equal to in quality or ability;

    "Nothing can rival cotton for durability"

    "Your performance doesn't even touch that of your colleagues"

    "Her persistence and ambition only matches that of her parents"

  • Touch (verb)

    tamper with;

    "Don't touch my CDs!"

  • Touch (verb)

    make a more or less disguised reference to;

    "He alluded to the problem but did not mention it"

  • Touch (verb)

    comprehend;

    "He could not touch the meaning of the poem"

  • Touch (verb)

    consume;

    "She didn't touch her food all night"

  • Touch (verb)

    dye with a color

  • Base (noun)

    any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water;

    "bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia"

  • Base (noun)

    installation from which a military force initiates operations;

    "the attack wiped out our forward bases"

  • Base (noun)

    lowest support of a structure;

    "it was built on a base of solid rock"

    "he stood at the foot of the tower"

  • Base (noun)

    place that runner must touch before scoring;

    "he scrambled to get back to the bag"

  • Base (noun)

    (numeration system) the positive integer that is equivalent to one in the next higher counting place;

    "10 is the radix of the decimal system"

  • Base (noun)

    the bottom or lowest part;

    "the base of the mountain"

  • Base (noun)

    (anatomy) the part of an organ nearest its point of attachment;

    "the base of the skull"

  • Base (noun)

    a lower limit;

    "the government established a wage floor"

  • Base (noun)

    the fundamental assumptions from which something is begun or developed or calculated or explained;

    "the whole argument rested on a basis of conjecture"

  • Base (noun)

    a support or foundation;

    "the base of the lamp"

  • Base (noun)

    the bottom side of a geometric figure from which the altitude can be constructed;

    "the base of the triangle"

  • Base (noun)

    the most important or necessary part of something;

    "the basis of this drink is orange juice"

  • Base (noun)

    the place where you are stationed and from which missions start and end

  • Base (noun)

    an intensely anti-western terrorist network that dispenses money and logistical support and training to a wide variety of radical Islamic terrorist group; has cells in more than 50 countries

  • Base (noun)

    (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed;

    "thematic vowels are part of the stem"

  • Base (noun)

    the stock of basic facilities and capital equipment needed for the functioning of a country or area;

    "the industrial base of Japan"

  • Base (noun)

    the principal ingredient of a mixture;

    "glycerinated gelatin is used as a base for many ointments"

    "he told the painter that he wanted a yellow base with just a hint of green"

    "everything she cooked seemed to have rice as the base"

  • Base (noun)

    a flat bottom on which something is intended to sit;

    "a tub should sit on its own base"

  • Base (noun)

    (electronics) the part of a transistor that separates the emitter from the collector

  • Base (verb)

    use as a basis for; found on;

    "base a claim on some observation"

  • Base (verb)

    use (purified cocaine) by burning it and inhaling the fumes

  • Base (verb)

    assign to a station

  • Base (adjective)

    serving as or forming a base;

    "the painter applied a base coat followed by two finishing coats"

  • Base (adjective)

    (used of metals) consisting of or alloyed with inferior metal;

    "base coins of aluminum"

    "a base metal"

  • Base (adjective)

    of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense);

    "baseborn wretches with dirty faces"

    "of humble (or lowly) birth"

  • Base (adjective)

    not adhering to ethical or moral principles;

    "base and unpatriotic motives"

    "a base, degrading way of life"

    "cheating is dishonorable"

    "they considered colonialism immoral"

    "unethical practices in handling public funds"

  • Base (adjective)

    having or showing an ignoble lack of honor or morality;

    "that liberal obedience without which your army would be a base rabble"

    "taking a mean advantage"

    "chok'd with ambition of the meaner sort"

    "something essentially vulgar and meanspirited in politics"

  • Base (adjective)

    illegitimate

  • Base (adjective)

    debased; not genuine;

    "an attempt to eliminate the base coinage"

Illustrations

Touch

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