VS.

Till vs. Sow

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Tillpreposition

Until; to, up to; as late as (a given time).

‘She stayed till the very end.’; ‘It's twenty till two. (1:40)’; ‘I have to work till eight o'clock tonight.’;

Sownoun

A female pig.

Tillpreposition

(obsolete) To, up to (physically).

‘They led him till his tent’;

Sownoun

A female bear.

Tillpreposition

(dialectal) In order that, to enable.

‘''Come here till I speak to you’;

Sownoun

A channel that conducts molten metal to molds.

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Tillconjunction

Until, until the time that.

‘Maybe you can, maybe you can't: you won't know till you try.’;

Sownoun

A mass of metal solidified in a mold.

Tillnoun

A cash register.

Sownoun

A contemptible, often fat woman.

Tillnoun

A removable box within a cash register containing the money.

‘Pull all the tills and lock them in the safe.’;

Sownoun

A sowbug.

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Tillnoun

The contents of a cash register, for example at the beginning or end of the day or of a cashier's shift.

‘My count of my till was 30 dollars short.’;

Sownoun

(military) A kind of covered shed, formerly used by besiegers in filling up and passing the ditch of a besieged place, sapping and mining the wall, etc.

Tillnoun

(obsolete) A tray or drawer in a chest.

Sowverb

(ambitransitive) To scatter, disperse, or plant (seeds).

‘When I had sown the field, the day's work was over.’; ‘As you sow, so shall you reap.’;

Tillnoun

glacial drift consisting of a mixture of clay, sand, pebbles and boulders

Sowverb

(figurative) To spread abroad; to propagate.

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Tillnoun

(dialect) manure or other material used to fertilize land

Sowverb

(figurative) To scatter over; to besprinkle.

Tillnoun

A vetch; a tare.

Sowverb

To sew. See Sew.

Tillverb

(transitive) To develop so as to improve or prepare for usage; to cultivate (said of knowledge, virtue, mind etc.).

Sowverb

To scatter, as seed, upon the earth; to plant by strewing; as, to sow wheat. Also used figuratively: To spread abroad; to propagate.

‘A sower went forth to sow; and when he sowed, some seeds fell by the wayside.’; ‘And sow dissension in the hearts of brothers.’;

Tillverb

(transitive) To work or cultivate or plough (soil); to prepare for growing vegetation and crops.

Sowverb

To scatter seed upon, in, or over; to supply or stock, as land, with seeds. Also used figuratively: To scatter over; to besprinkle.

‘The intellectual faculty is a goodly field, . . . and it is the worst husbandry in the world to sow it with trifles.’; ‘[He] sowed with stars the heaven.’; ‘Now morn . . . sowed the earth with orient pearl.’;

Tillverb

(intransitive) To cultivate soil.

Sowverb

To scatter seed for growth and the production of a crop; - literally or figuratively.

‘They that sow in tears shall reap in joi.’;

Tillverb

(obsolete) To prepare; to get.

Sownoun

The female of swine, or of the hog kind.

Tillnoun

A vetch; a tare.

Sownoun

A sow bug.

Tillnoun

A drawer.

Sownoun

A channel or runner which receives the rows of molds in the pig bed.

Tillnoun

A deposit of clay, sand, and gravel, without lamination, formed in a glacier valley by means of the waters derived from the melting glaciers; - sometimes applied to alluvium of an upper river terrace, when not laminated, and appearing as if formed in the same manner.

Sownoun

A kind of covered shed, formerly used by besiegers in filling up and passing the ditch of a besieged place, sapping and mining the wall, or the like.

Tillnoun

A kind of coarse, obdurate land.

Sownoun

an adult female hog

Tillpreposition

To; unto; up to; as far as; until; - now used only in respect to time, but formerly, also, of place, degree, etc., and still so used in Scotland and in parts of England and Ireland; as, I worked till four o'clock; I will wait till next week.

‘He . . . came till an house.’; ‘Women, up till thisCramped under worse than South-sea-isle taboo.’; ‘Similar sentiments will recur to every one familiar with his writings - all through them till the very end.’;

Sowverb

place (seeds) in or on the ground for future growth;

‘She sowed sunflower seeds’;

Tillconjunction

As far as; up to the place or degree that; especially, up to the time that; that is, to the time specified in the sentence or clause following; until.

‘And said unto them, Occupy till I come.’; ‘Mediate so long till you make some act of prayer to God.’; ‘There was no outbreak till the regiment arrived.’;

Sowverb

introduce into an environment;

‘sow suspicion or beliefs’;

Tillverb

To plow and prepare for seed, and to sow, dress, raise crops from, etc., to cultivate; as, to till the earth, a field, a farm.

‘No field nolde [would not] tilye.’; ‘the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.’;

Sowverb

place seeds in or on (the ground);

‘sow the ground with sunflower seeds’;

Tillverb

To prepare; to get.

Tillverb

To cultivate land.

Tillnoun

unstratified soil deposited by a glacier; consists of sand and clay and gravel and boulders mixed together

Tillnoun

a treasury for government funds

Tillnoun

a strongbox for holding cash

Tillverb

work land as by ploughing, harrowing, and manuring, in order to make it ready for cultivation;

‘till the soil’;

Tillpreposition

less formal way of saying until

Tillconjunction

less formal way of saying until

Tillnoun

a cash register or drawer for money in a shop, bank, or restaurant

‘there were queues at the till’; ‘checkout tills’;

Tillnoun

boulder clay or other sediment deposited by melting glaciers or ice sheets.

Tillverb

prepare and cultivate (land) for crops

‘no land was being tilled or crops sown’;

Till

Till or glacial till is unsorted glacial sediment. Till is derived from the erosion and entrainment of material by the moving ice of a glacier.

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