VS.

Tight vs. Thin

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Tightadjective

Firmly held together; compact; not loose or open.

‘tight cloth; a tight knot’;

Thinadjective

Having little thickness or extent from one surface to its opposite.

‘thin plate of metal;’; ‘thin paper;’; ‘thin board;’; ‘thin covering’;

Tightadjective

Unyielding or firm

‘tight control on a situation’;

Thinadjective

Very narrow in all diameters; having a cross section that is small in all directions.

‘thin wire;’; ‘thin string’;

Tightadjective

Under high tension.

‘Make sure to pull the rope tight.’;

Thinadjective

Having little body fat or flesh; slim; slender; lean; gaunt.

‘thin person’;

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Tightadjective

(colloquial) Scarce, hard to come by.

‘I grew up in a poor neighborhood; money was very tight, but we made do.’;

Thinadjective

Of low viscosity or low specific gravity, e.g., as is water compared to honey.

Tightadjective

Intimately friendly.

‘We've grown tighter over the years.’;

Thinadjective

Scarce; not close, crowded, or numerous; not filling the space.

‘The trees of a forest are thin; the corn or grass is thin.’;

Tightadjective

Miserly or frugal.

‘He's a bit tight with his money.’;

Thinadjective

(golf) Describing a poorly played golf shot where the ball is struck by the bottom part of the club head. See fat, shank, toe.

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Tightadjective

(of a space, design or arrangement) Narrow, such that it is difficult for something or someone to pass through it.

‘The passageway was so tight we could barely get through.’; ‘They flew in a tight formation.’;

Thinadjective

Lacking body or volume; small; feeble; not full.

Tightadjective

Fitting close, or too close, to the body.

‘a tight coat;’; ‘My socks are too tight.’;

Thinadjective

Slight; small; slender; flimsy; superficial; inadequate; not sufficient for a covering.

‘a thin disguise’;

Tightadjective

Of a turn, sharp, so that the timeframe for making it is narrow and following it is difficult.

‘The mountain pass was made dangerous by its many tight corners.’;

Thinnoun

(philately) A loss or tearing of paper from the back of a stamp, although not sufficient to create a complete hole.

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Tightadjective

Lacking holes; difficult to penetrate; waterproof.

Thinnoun

Any food produced or served in thin slices.

‘chocolate mint thins’; ‘potato thins’;

Tightadjective

Well-rehearsed and accurate in execution.

‘Their marching band is extremely tight.’;

Thinverb

(transitive) To make thin or thinner.

Tightadjective

(sport) Not conceding many goals.

Thinverb

(intransitive) To become thin or thinner.

Tightadjective

(slang) Intoxicated; drunk or acting like being drunk.

‘We went drinking and got tight.’;

Thinverb

To dilute.

Tightadjective

(slang) Extraordinarily great or special.

‘That is one tight bicycle!’;

Thinverb

To remove some plants or parts of plants in order to improve the growth of what remains.

Tightadjective

Mean; unfair; unkind.

Thinadverb

Not thickly or closely; in a scattered state.

‘seed sown thin’;

Tightadjective

(obsolete) Not ragged; whole; neat; tidy.

Thinadjective

Having little thickness or extent from one surface to its opposite; as, a thin plate of metal; thin paper; a thin board; a thin covering.

Tightadjective

(obsolete) Handy; adroit; brisk.

Thinadjective

Rare; not dense or thick; - applied to fluids or soft mixtures; as, thin blood; thin broth; thin air.

‘In the day, when the air is more thin.’; ‘Satan, bowing lowHis gray dissimulation, disappeared,Into thin air diffused.’;

Tightadjective

(poker) Of a player, who plays very few hands. en

Thinadjective

Not close; not crowded; not filling the space; not having the individuals of which the thing is composed in a close or compact state; hence, not abundant; as, the trees of a forest are thin; the corn or grass is thin.

‘Ferrara is very large, but extremely thin of people.’;

Tightadjective

(poker) Using a strategy which involves playing very few hands. en

Thinadjective

Not full or well grown; wanting in plumpness.

‘Seven thin ears . . . blasted with the east wind.’;

Tightadverb

Firmly, so as not to come loose easily.

‘Make sure the lid is closed tight.’;

Thinadjective

Not stout; slim; slender; lean; gaunt; as, a person becomes thin by disease.

Tightadverb

Soundly.

‘Good night, sleep tight.’;

Thinadjective

Wanting in body or volume; small; feeble; not full.

‘Thin, hollow sounds, and lamentable screams.’;

Tightverb

(obsolete) To tighten.

Thinadjective

Slight; small; slender; flimsy; wanting substance or depth or force; superficial; inadequate; not sufficient for a covering; as, a thin disguise.

‘My tale is done, for my wit is but thin.’;

Tight

p. p. of Tie.

Thinadverb

Not thickly or closely; in a seattered state; as, seed sown thin.

‘Spain is thin sown of people.’;

Tightadjective

Firmly held together; compact; not loose or open; as, tight cloth; a tight knot.

Thinverb

To make thin (in any of the senses of the adjective).

Tightadjective

Close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; - often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight.

Thinverb

To grow or become thin; - used with some adverbs, as out, away, etc.; as, geological strata thin out, i. e., gradually diminish in thickness until they disappear.

Tightadjective

Fitting close, or too close, to the body; as, a tight coat or other garment.

Thinverb

lose thickness; become thin or thinner

Tightadjective

Not ragged; whole; neat; tidy.

‘Clad very plain, but clean and tight.’; ‘I'll spin and card, and keep our children tight.’;

Thinverb

make thin or thinner;

‘Thin the solution’;

Tightadjective

Close; parsimonious; saving; as, a man tight in his dealings.

Thinverb

lessen the strength or flavor of a solution or mixture;

‘cut bourbon’;

Tightadjective

Not slack or loose; firmly stretched; taut; - applied to a rope, chain, or the like, extended or stretched out.

Thinverb

take off weight

Tightadjective

Handy; adroit; brisk.

Thinadjective

of relatively small extent from one surface to the opposite or in cross section;

‘thin wire’; ‘a thin chiffon blouse’; ‘a thin book’; ‘a thin layer of paint’;

Tightadjective

Somewhat intoxicated; tipsy.

Thinadjective

lacking excess flesh;

‘you can't be too rich or too thin’; ‘Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look’;

Tightadjective

Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; - said of money or the money market. Cf. Easy, 7.

Thinadjective

very narrow;

‘a thin line across the page’;

Tightverb

To tighten.

Thinadjective

having little substance or significance;

‘a flimsy excuse’; ‘slight evidence’; ‘a tenuous argument’; ‘a thin plot’;

Tightadjective

closely constrained or constricted or constricting;

‘tight skirts’; ‘he hated tight starched collars’; ‘fingers closed in a tight fist’; ‘a tight feeling in his chest’;

Thinadjective

not dense;

‘a thin beard’; ‘trees were sparse’;

Tightadjective

pulled or drawn tight;

‘taut sails’; ‘a tight drumhead’; ‘a tight rope’;

Thinadjective

relatively thin in consistency or low in density; not viscous;

‘air is thin at high altitudes’; ‘a thin soup’; ‘skimmed milk is much thinner than whole milk’; ‘thin oil’;

Tightadjective

set so close together as to be invulnerable to penetration;

‘in tight formation’; ‘a tight blockade’;

Thinadjective

(of sound) lacking resonance or volume;

‘a thin feeble cry’;

Tightadjective

pressed tightly together;

‘with lips compressed’;

Thinadjective

lacking spirit or sincere effort;

‘a thin smile’;

Tightadjective

used of persons or behavior; characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity;

‘a mean person’; ‘he left a miserly tip’;

Thinadverb

without viscosity;

‘the blood was flowing thin’;

Tightadjective

affected by scarcity and expensive to borrow;

‘tight money’; ‘a tight market’;

Thinadjective

with opposite surfaces or sides that are close or relatively close together

‘a thin line of paint’; ‘thin slices of bread’;

Tightadjective

of such close construction as to be impermeable;

‘a tight roof’; ‘warm in our tight little house’;

Thinadjective

(of a garment or other knitted or woven item) made of light material

‘his thin jacket’;

Tightadjective

of textiles;

‘a close weave’; ‘smooth percale with a very tight weave’;

Thinadjective

(of a garment or fabric) having become less thick as a result of wear

‘our clothing was getting thin’;

Tightadjective

securely or solidly fixed in place; rigid;

‘the bolts are tight’;

Thinadjective

(of writing or printing) consisting of narrow lines

‘tall, thin lettering’;

Tightadjective

(of a contest or contestants) evenly matched;

‘a close contest’; ‘a close election’; ‘a tight game’;

Thinadjective

having little, or too little, flesh or fat on the body

‘a thin, gawky adolescent’;

Tightadjective

very drunk

Thinadjective

having few parts or members relative to the area covered or filled; sparse

‘a depressingly thin crowd’; ‘his hair was going thin’;

Tightadjective

exasperatingly difficult to handle or circumvent;

‘a nasty problem’; ‘a good man to have on your side in a tight situation’;

Thinadjective

(of the air or a substance in the air) not dense

‘the thin cold air of the mountains’;

Tightadjective

demanding strict attention to rules and procedures;

‘rigorous discipline’; ‘tight security’; ‘stringent safety measures’;

Thinadjective

denoting a route on which the holds are small or scarce.

Tightadjective

packed closely together;

‘the stood in a tight little group’; ‘hair in tight curls’; ‘the pub was packed tight’;

Thinadjective

(of a liquid substance) not containing much solid; flowing freely

‘thin soup’;

Tightadverb

firmly or tightly;

‘held fast to the rope’; ‘her foot was stuck fast’; ‘held tight’;

Thinadjective

lacking substance or quality; weak or inadequate

‘the evidence is rather thin’;

Tightadverb

in an attentive manner;

‘he remained close on his guard’;

Thinadjective

(of a sound) faint and high-pitched

‘a thin, reedy little voice’;

Thinadjective

(of a smile) weak and forced.

Thinadverb

with little thickness or depth

‘a thin-sliced loaf’; ‘cut the ham as thin as possible’;

Thinverb

make or become less dense, crowded, or numerous

‘the trees began to thin out’; ‘the remorseless fire of archers thinned their ranks’;

Thinverb

remove some plants from (a row or area) to allow the others more room to grow

‘thin out the rows of peas’;

Thinverb

make or become more watery in consistency

‘if the soup is too thick, add a little water to thin it down’; ‘the blood thins’;

Thinverb

make or become smaller in thickness

‘their effect in thinning the ozone layer is probably slowing the global warming trend’;

Thinverb

hit (a ball) above its centre.

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