VS.

Thornproof vs. Thorn

Published:

Thornproofadjective

Resistant to tearing by thorns.

Thornnoun

(botany) A sharp protective spine of a plant.

Thornnoun

Any shrub or small tree that bears thorns, especially a hawthorn.

‘the white thorn’; ‘the cockspur thorn’;

Thornnoun

(figurative) That which pricks or annoys; anything troublesome.

Thornnoun

A letter of Latin script (capital: Þ, small: þ), borrowed by Old English from the futhark to represent a dental fricative, then not distinguished from eth, but in modern use (in Icelandic and other languages, but no longer in English) used only for the voiceless dental fricative found in English thigh

Thornverb

To pierce with, or as if with, a thorn

ADVERTISEMENT

Thornnoun

A hard and sharp-pointed projection from a woody stem; usually, a branch so transformed; a spine.

Thornnoun

Any shrub or small tree which bears thorns; especially, any species of the genus Cratægus, as the hawthorn, whitethorn, cockspur thorn.

Thornnoun

Fig.: That which pricks or annoys as a thorn; anything troublesome; trouble; care.

‘There was given to me a thorn in the flesh, the messenger of Satan to buffet me.’; ‘The guilt of empire, all its thorns and cares,Be only mine.’;

Thornnoun

The name of the Anglo-Saxon letter , capital form . It was used to represent both of the sounds of English th, as in thin, then. So called because it was the initial letter of thorn, a spine.

Thornverb

To prick, as with a thorn.

‘I am the only rose of all the stockThat never thorn'd him.’;

Thornnoun

something that causes irritation and annoyance;

‘he's a thorn in my flesh’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Thornnoun

a sharp-pointed tip on a stem or leaf

Thornnoun

a Germanic character of runic origin

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons