VS.

Swing vs. Shake

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Swingverb

(intransitive) To rotate about an off-centre fixed point.

‘The plant swung in the breeze.’;

Shakeverb

To cause (something) to move rapidly in opposite directions alternatingly.

‘The earthquake shook the building.’; ‘He shook the can of soda for thirty seconds before delivering it to me, so that, when I popped it open, soda went everywhere.’;

Swingverb

(intransitive) To dance.

Shakeverb

(transitive) To move (one's head) from side to side, especially to indicate refusal, reluctance, or disapproval.

‘Shaking his head, he kept repeating "No, no, no".’;

Swingverb

(intransitive) To ride on a swing.

‘The children laughed as they swung.’;

Shakeverb

(transitive) To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion.

‘to shake fruit down from a tree’;

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Swingverb

(intransitive) To participate in the swinging lifestyle; to participate in wife-swapping.

Shakeverb

(transitive) To disturb emotionally; to shock.

‘Her father's death shook her terribly.’; ‘He was shaken by what had happened.’;

Swingverb

(intransitive) To hang from the gallows.

Shakeverb

(transitive) To lose, evade, or get rid of (something).

‘I can't shake the feeling that I forgot something.’;

Swingverb

to move sideways in its trajectory.

Shakeverb

(intransitive) To move from side to side.

‘She shook with grief.’;

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Swingverb

(intransitive) To fluctuate or change.

‘It wasn't long before the crowd's mood swung towards restless irritability.’;

Shakeverb

To shake hands.

‘OK, let's shake on it.’;

Swingverb

(transitive) To move (an object) backward and forward; to wave.

‘He swung his sword as hard as he could.’;

Shakeverb

(intransitive) To dance.

‘She was shaking it on the dance floor.’;

Swingverb

(transitive) To change (a numerical result); especially to change the outcome of an election.

Shakeverb

To give a tremulous tone to; to trill.

‘to shake a note in music’;

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Swingverb

(transitive) To make (something) work; especially to afford (something) financially.

‘If it’s not too expensive, I think we can swing it.’;

Shakeverb

To threaten to overthrow.

‘The experience shook my religious belief.’;

Swingverb

To play notes that are in pairs by making the first of the pair slightly longer than written (augmentation) and the second, resulting in a bouncy, uneven rhythm.

Shakeverb

To be agitated; to lose firmness.

Swingverb

to make the ball move sideways in its trajectory.

Shakenoun

The act of shaking or being shaken; tremulous or back-and-forth motion.

‘The cat gave the mouse a shake.’; ‘She replied in the negative, with a shake of her head.’;

Swingverb

To move one's arm in a punching motion.

Shakenoun

A milkshake.

Swingverb

(transitive) In dancing, to turn around in a small circle with one's partner, holding hands or arms.

‘"to swing one's partner", or simply "to swing"’;

Shakenoun

A beverage made by adding ice cream to a (usually carbonated) drink; a float.

Swingverb

To admit or turn something for the purpose of shaping it; said of a lathe.

‘The lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter.’;

Shakenoun

Shake cannabis, small, leafy fragments of cannabis that gather at the bottom of a bag of marijuana.

Swingverb

To put (a door, gate, etc.) on hinges so that it can swing or turn.

Shakenoun

(building material) A thin shingle.

Swingverb

(nautical) To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor.

‘A ship swings with the tide.’;

Shakenoun

A crack or split between the growth rings in wood.

Swingnoun

The manner in which something is swung.

‘He worked tirelessly to improve his golf swing.’; ‘Door swing indicates direction the door opens.’; ‘the swing of a pendulum’;

Shakenoun

A fissure in rock or earth.

Swingnoun

A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing.

Shakenoun

A basic wooden shingle made from split logs, traditionally used for roofing etc.

Swingnoun

A hanging seat in a children's playground, for acrobats in a circus, or on a porch for relaxing.

Shakenoun

(informal) Instant, second. (Especially in two shakes.)

Swingnoun

A dance style.

Shakenoun

(nautical) One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.

Swingnoun

(music) The genre of music associated with this dance style.

Shakenoun

(music) A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.

Swingnoun

The amount of change towards or away from something.

Shakenoun

A shook of staves and headings.

Swingnoun

(politics) In an election, the increase or decrease in the number of votes for opposition parties compared with votes for the incumbent party.

‘The polls showed a wide swing to Labour.’;

Shakenoun

The redshank, so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.

Swingnoun

(cricket) Sideways movement of the ball as it flies through the air.

Shake

obs. p. p. of Shake.

Swingnoun

The diameter that a lathe can cut.

Shakeverb

To cause to move with quick or violent vibrations; to move rapidly one way and the other; to make to tremble or shiver; to agitate.

‘As a fig tree casteth her untimely figs, when she is shaken of a mighty wind.’; ‘Ascend my chariot; guide the rapid wheelsThat shake heaven's basis.’;

Swingnoun

In a musical theater production, a performer who understudies several roles.

Shakeverb

Fig.: To move from firmness; to weaken the stability of; to cause to waver; to impair the resolution of.

‘When his doctrines grew too strong to be shook by his enemies, they persecuted his reputation.’; ‘Thy equal fear that my firm faith and loveCan by his fraud be shaken or seduced.’;

Swingnoun

A basic dance step in which a pair link hands and turn round together in a circle.

Shakeverb

To give a tremulous tone to; to trill; as, to shake a note in music.

Swingnoun

Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it.

Shakeverb

To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion; to rid one's self of; - generally with an adverb, as off, out, etc.; as, to shake fruit down from a tree.

‘Shake off the golden slumber of repose.’; ‘'Tis our fast intentTo shake all cares and business from our age.’; ‘I could scarcely shake him out of my company.’;

Swingnoun

(obsolete) Free course; unrestrained liberty.

Shakeverb

To be agitated with a waving or vibratory motion; to tremble; to shiver; to quake; to totter.

‘Under his burning wheelsThe steadfast empyrean shook throughout,All but the throne itself of God.’; ‘What danger? Who 's that that shakes behind there?’;

Swingnoun

(boxing) A type of hook with the arm more extended.

Shakenoun

The act or result of shaking; a vacillating or wavering motion; a rapid motion one way and other; a trembling, quaking, or shivering; agitation.

‘The great soldier's honor was composedOf thicker stuff, which could endure a shake.’; ‘Our salutations were very hearty on both sides, consisting of many kind shakes of the hand.’;

Swingverb

To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air; to wave; to vibrate; to oscillate.

‘I tried if a pendulum would swing faster, or continue swinging longer, in case of exsuction of the air.’;

Shakenoun

A fissure or crack in timber, caused by its being dried too suddenly.

Swingverb

To sway or move from one side or direction to another; as, the door swung open.

Shakenoun

A fissure in rock or earth.

Swingverb

To use a swing; as, a boy swings for exercise or pleasure. See Swing, n., 3.

Shakenoun

A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.

Swingverb

To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor; as, a ship swings with the tide.

Shakenoun

One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.

Swingverb

To be hanged.

‘He had swung round the circle of theories and systems in which his age abounded, without finding relief.’;

Shakenoun

A shook of staves and headings.

Swingverb

To cause to swing or vibrate; to cause to move backward and forward, or from one side to the other.

‘He swings his tail, and swiftly turns his round.’; ‘They get on ropes, as you must have seen the children, and are swung by their men visitants.’;

Shakenoun

The redshank; - so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.

Swingverb

To give a circular movement to; to whirl; to brandish; as, to swing a sword; to swing a club; hence, colloquially, to manage; as, to swing a business.

Shakenoun

building material used as siding or roofing

Swingverb

To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of shaping it; - said of a lathe; as, the lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter.

Shakenoun

frothy drink of milk and flavoring and sometimes fruit or ice cream

Swingnoun

The act of swinging; a waving, oscillating, or vibratory motion of a hanging or pivoted object; oscillation; as, the swing of a pendulum.

Shakenoun

a note that alternates rapidly with another note a semitone above it

Swingnoun

Swaying motion from one side or direction to the other; as, some men walk with a swing.

Shakenoun

grasping and shaking a person's hand (as to acknowledge an introduction or to agree on a contract)

Swingnoun

A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing; especially, an apparatus for recreation by swinging, commonly consisting of a rope, the two ends of which are attached overhead, as to the bough of a tree, a seat being placed in the loop at the bottom; also, any contrivance by which a similar motion is produced for amusement or exercise.

Shakenoun

reflex shaking caused by cold or fear or excitement

Swingnoun

Influence of power of a body put in swaying motion.

‘The ram that batters down the wall,For the great swing and rudeness of his poise,They place before his hand that made the engine.’;

Shakenoun

causing to move repeatedly from side to side

Swingnoun

Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it.

Shakeverb

move or cause to move back and forth;

‘The chemist shook the flask vigorously’; ‘My hands were shaking’;

Swingnoun

Free course; unrestrained liberty or license; tendency.

‘To prevent anything which may prove an obstacle to the full swing of his genius.’;

Shakeverb

move with or as if with a tremor;

‘his hands shook’;

Swingnoun

a state of steady vigorous action that is characteristic of an activity;

‘the party went with a swing’; ‘it took time to get into the swing of things’;

Shakeverb

shake or vibrate rapidly and intensively;

‘The old engine was juddering’;

Swingnoun

mechanical device used as a plaything to support someone swinging back and forth

Shakeverb

move back and forth or sideways;

‘the ship was rocking’; ‘the tall building swayed’; ‘She rocked back and forth on her feet’;

Swingnoun

a sweeping blow or stroke;

‘he took a wild swing at my head’;

Shakeverb

undermine or cause to waver;

‘my faith has been shaken’; ‘The bad news shook her hopes’;

Swingnoun

changing location by moving back and forth

Shakeverb

stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of;

‘These stories shook the community’; ‘the civil war shook the country’;

Swingnoun

a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930s; flowing rhythms but less complex than later styles of jazz

Shakeverb

get rid of;

‘I couldn't shake the car that was following me’;

Swingnoun

a jaunty rhythm in music

Shakeverb

bring to a specified condition by or as if by shaking;

‘He was shaken from his dreams’; ‘shake the salt out of the salt shaker’;

Swingnoun

the act of swinging a golf club at a golf ball and (usually) hitting it

Shakeverb

shake (a body part) to communicate a greeting, feeling, or cognitive state;

‘shake one's head’; ‘She shook her finger at the naughty students’; ‘The old enemies shook hands’; ‘Don't shake your fist at me!’;

Swingnoun

in baseball; a batter's attempt to hit a pitched ball;

‘he took a vicious cut at the ball’;

Shakeverb

(of a structure or area of land) tremble or vibrate

‘buildings shook in Sacramento and tremors were felt in Reno’;

Swingnoun

a square dance figure; a pair of dancers join hands and dance around a point between them

Shakeverb

cause to tremble or vibrate

‘a severe earthquake shook the area’;

Swingverb

move in a curve or arc, usually with the intent of hitting;

‘He swung his left fist’; ‘swing a bat’;

Shakeverb

(of a person, part of the body, or the voice) tremble uncontrollably from a strong emotion

‘Luke was shaking with rage’; ‘her voice shook with passion’;

Swingverb

move or walk in a swinging or swaying manner;

‘He swung back’;

Shakeverb

move (an object) up and down or from side to side with rapid, forceful, jerky movements

‘she stood in the hall and shook her umbrella’;

Swingverb

change direction with a swinging motion; turn;

‘swing back’; ‘swing forward’;

Shakeverb

remove (an object or substance) from something by movements of this kind

‘they shook the sand out of their shoes’;

Swingverb

influence decisively;

‘This action swung many votes over to his side’;

Shakeverb

grasp (someone) and move them roughly to and fro, either in anger or to rouse them from sleep

‘he gently shook the driver awake and they set off’;

Swingverb

make a big sweeping gesture or movement

Shakeverb

brandish in anger or as a warning; make a threatening gesture with

‘men shook their fists and shouted’;

Swingverb

hang freely;

‘the ornaments dangled from the tree’; ‘The light dropped from the ceiling’;

Shakeverb

get rid of or put an end to

‘I couldn't shake the feeling that everyone was laughing at me’;

Swingverb

hit or aim at with a sweeping arm movement;

‘The soccer player began to swing at the referee’;

Shakeverb

upset the composure or confidence of; shock or astonish

‘the boy was visibly shaken’; ‘rumours of a further loss shook the market’;

Swingverb

alternate dramatically between high and low values;

‘his mood swings’; ‘the market is swinging up and down’;

Shakeverb

cause a change of mood or attitude by shocking or disturbing (someone)

‘if the bombing cannot shake the government out of its complacency, what will?’;

Swingverb

live in a lively, modern, and relaxed style;

‘The Woodstock generation attempted to swing freely’;

Shakenoun

an act of shaking

‘she gave her red curls a vehement shake’;

Swingverb

have a certain musical rhythm;

‘The music has to swing’;

Shakenoun

an amount of something that is sprinkled by shaking a container

‘add a few shakes of sea salt and black pepper’;

Swingverb

be a social swinger; socialize a lot

Shakenoun

a fit of trembling or shivering

‘I wouldn't go in there, it gives me the shakes’;

Swingverb

play with a subtle and intuitively felt sense of rhythm

Shakenoun

short for milkshake

Swingverb

engage freely in promiscuous sex, often with the husband or wife of one's friends;

‘There were many swinging couples in the 1960's’;

Shakenoun

an earth tremor.

Swingverb

move or cause to move back and forth or from side to side while suspended or on an axis

‘her long black skirt swung about her legs’; ‘the door swung shut behind him’; ‘a priest began swinging a censer’;

Shakenoun

a trill.

Swingverb

be executed by hanging

‘now he was going to swing for it’;

Shakenoun

a kind of rough wooden shingle, used especially on rustic buildings

‘cedar shakes’;

Swingverb

turn (a ship or aircraft) to all compass points in succession, in order to test compass error.

Swingverb

move by grasping a support from below and leaping

‘the Irishman swung himself into the saddle’; ‘we swung across like two trapeze artists’;

Swingverb

move quickly round to the opposite direction

‘Ronni had swung round to face him’;

Swingverb

move with a rhythmic swaying gait

‘the riflemen swung along smartly’;

Swingverb

move or cause to move in a smooth, curving line

‘she swung her legs to the side of the bed’; ‘the cab swung into the car park’;

Swingverb

bring down (something held) with a curving movement, typically in order to hit an object

‘I swung the club and missed the ball’;

Swingverb

attempt to hit or punch, typically with a wide curving movement of the arm

‘he swung at me with the tyre wrench’;

Swingverb

deliver (a punch) with a wide curving movement of the arm

‘she swung a punch at him’;

Swingverb

(of a bowler) make a delivery of (a ball) deviate sideways from a regular course in the air.

Swingverb

(of a delivery) deviate sideways from a regular course.

Swingverb

shift or cause to shift from one opinion, mood, or state of affairs to another

‘opinion swung in the Chancellor's favour’; ‘the failure to seek peace could swing sentiment the other way’;

Swingverb

have a decisive influence on (something, especially a vote or election)

‘an attempt to swing the vote in their favour’;

Swingverb

succeed in bringing about

‘what swung it was the £17,000 she offered the panel to let her win’;

Swingverb

play music with a flowing but vigorous rhythm

‘the band swung on’;

Swingverb

(of music) be played with a flowing but vigorous rhythm.

Swingverb

(of an event, place, or way of life) be lively, exciting, or fashionable.

Swingverb

engage in group sex or swap sexual partners within a group, especially on a habitual basis.

Swingnoun

a seat suspended by ropes or chains, on which someone may sit and swing back and forth.

Swingnoun

a period of time spent swinging back and forth on a seat suspended by ropes or chains.

Swingnoun

an act of swinging

‘with the swing of her arm, the knife flashed through the air’;

Swingnoun

the manner in which a golf club or a bat is swung

‘the flaws in his swing weren't evident when he was an amateur’;

Swingnoun

the motion of swinging

‘this short cut gave her hair new movement and swing’;

Swingnoun

an attempted blow or punch

‘Neil took a swing at her’;

Swingnoun

sideways deviation of the ball from a regular path

‘a swing bowler’;

Swingnoun

a discernible change in opinion, especially the amount by which votes or points scored change from one side to another

‘a five per cent swing to Labour’;

Swingnoun

a style of jazz or dance music with a flowing but vigorous rhythm.

Swingnoun

the rhythmic feeling or drive of swing.

Swingnoun

a swift tour involving a number of stops, especially one undertaken as part of a political campaign.

Swingnoun

(in musical theatre) an understudy, typically one who covers multiple roles in the chorus of a particular production.

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