VS.

Sweep vs. Vacuum

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Sweepverb

(transitive) To clean (a surface) by means of a stroking motion of a broom or brush.

‘to sweep a floor, the street, or a chimney’;

Vacuumnoun

A region of space that contains no matter.

Sweepverb

(intransitive) To move through a (horizontal) arc or similar long stroke.

‘The wind sweeps across the plain.’; ‘The offended countess swept out of the ballroom.’;

Vacuumnoun

(plural only "vacuums") A vacuum cleaner.

Sweepverb

(transitive) To search (a place) methodically.

Vacuumnoun

The condition of rarefaction, or reduction of pressure below that of the atmosphere, in a vessel, such as the condenser of a steam engine, which is nearly exhausted of air or steam, etc.

‘a vacuum of 26 inches of mercury, or 13 pounds per square inch’;

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Sweepverb

To travel quickly.

Vacuumnoun

(physics) A spacetime having tensors of zero magnitude

Sweepverb

(cricket) To play a sweep shot.

Vacuumverb

(transitive) To clean (something) with a vacuum cleaner.

Sweepverb

(curling) To brush the ice in front of a moving stone, causing it to travel farther and to curl less.

Vacuumverb

(intransitive) To use a vacuum cleaner.

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Sweepverb

To move something in a long sweeping motion, as a broom.

Vacuumverb

To optimise a database or database table by physically removing deleted tuples.

Sweepverb

To win (a series) without drawing or losing any of the games in that series.

Vacuumnoun

A space entirely devoid of matter (called also, by way of distinction, absolute vacuum); hence, in a more general sense, a space, as the interior of a closed vessel, which has been exhausted to a high or the highest degree by an air pump or other artificial means; as, water boils at a reduced temperature in a vacuum.

Sweepverb

To defeat (a team) in a series without drawing or losing any of the games in that series.

Vacuumnoun

The condition of rarefaction, or reduction of pressure below that of the atmosphere, in a vessel, as the condenser of a steam engine, which is nearly exhausted of air or steam, etc.; as, a vacuum of 26 inches of mercury, or 13 pounds per square inch.

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Sweepverb

(transitive) To remove something abruptly and thoroughly.

‘She swept the peelings off the table onto the floor.’; ‘The wind sweeps the snow from the hills.’; ‘The flooded river swept away the wooden dam.’;

Vacuumnoun

the absence of matter

Sweepverb

To brush against or over; to rub lightly along.

‘Their long descending train, / With rubies edged and sapphires, swept the plain.’;

Vacuumnoun

an empty area or space;

‘the huge desert voids’; ‘the emptiness of outer space’; ‘without their support he'll be ruling in a vacuum’;

Sweepverb

To carry with a long, swinging, or dragging motion; hence, to carry in a stately or proud fashion.

Vacuumnoun

a region empty of matter

Sweepverb

To strike with a long stroke.

Vacuumnoun

an electrical home appliance that cleans by suction

Sweepverb

(nautical) To draw or drag something over.

‘to sweep the bottom of a river with a net’;

Vacuumverb

clean with a vacuum cleaner;

‘vacuum the carpets’;

Sweepverb

To pass over, or traverse, with the eye or with an instrument of observation.

‘to sweep the heavens with a telescope’;

Vacuum

A vacuum is a space devoid of matter. The word is derived from the Latin adjective vacuus for or .

‘vacant’; ‘void’;

Sweepnoun

A single action of sweeping.

‘Give the front steps a quick sweep to get rid of those fallen leaves.’;

Sweepnoun

The person who steers a dragon boat.

Sweepnoun

A person who stands at the stern of a surf boat, steering with a steering oar and commanding the crew.

Sweepnoun

A chimney sweep.

Sweepnoun

A methodical search, typically for bugs (electronic listening devices).

Sweepnoun

(cricket) A batsman's shot, played from a kneeling position with a swinging horizontal bat.

‘Bradman attempted a sweep, but in fact top edged the ball to the wicket keeper’;

Sweepnoun

A lottery, usually on the results of a sporting event, where players win if their randomly chosen team wins.

‘Jim will win fifty dollars in the office sweep if Japan wins the World Cup.’;

Sweepnoun

A flow of water parallel to shore caused by wave action at an ocean beach or at a point or headland.

Sweepnoun

(martial arts) A throw or takedown that primarily uses the legs to attack an opponent's legs.

Sweepnoun

Violent and general destruction.

‘the sweep of an epidemic disease’;

Sweepnoun

(metalworking) A movable templet for making moulds, in loam moulding.

Sweepnoun

(card games) In the game casino, the act of capturing all face-up cards from the table.

Sweepnoun

The compass of any turning body or of any motion.

‘the sweep of a door; the sweep of the eye’;

Sweepnoun

Direction or departure of a curve, a road, an arch, etc. away from a rectilinear line.

Sweepnoun

A large oar used in small vessels, partly to propel them and partly to steer them.

Sweepnoun

The almond furnace.

Sweepnoun

A long pole, or piece of timber, moved on a horizontal fulcrum fixed to a tall post and used to raise and lower a bucket in a well for drawing water.

Sweepnoun

Any of the blades of a windmill.

Sweepnoun

(in the plural) The sweepings of workshops where precious metals are worked, containing filings, etc.

Sweepnoun

Any of several pl=s in the kyphosid subfamily Scorpidinae.

Sweepnoun

An expanse or a swath, a strip of land.

Sweepverb

To pass a broom across (a surface) so as to remove loose dirt, dust, etc.; to brush, or rub over, with a broom for the purpose of cleaning; as, to sweep a floor, the street, or a chimney. Used also figuratively.

‘I will sweep it with the besom of destruction.’;

Sweepverb

To drive or carry along or off with a broom or a brush, or as if with a broom; to remove by, or as if by, brushing; as, to sweep dirt from a floor; the wind sweeps the snow from the hills; a freshet sweeps away a dam, timber, or rubbish; a pestilence sweeps off multitudes.

‘The hail shall sweep away the refuge of lies.’; ‘I have already swept the stakes.’;

Sweepverb

To brush against or over; to rub lightly along.

‘Their long descending train,With rubies edged and sapphires, swept the plain.’;

Sweepverb

To carry with a long, swinging, or dragging motion; hence, to carry in a stately or proud fashion.

‘And like a peacock sweep along his tail.’;

Sweepverb

To strike with a long stroke.

‘Wake into voice each silent string,And sweep the sounding lyre.’;

Sweepverb

To draw or drag something over; as, to sweep the bottom of a river with a net.

Sweepverb

To pass over, or traverse, with the eye or with an instrument of observation; as, to sweep the heavens with a telescope.

Sweepverb

To clean rooms, yards, etc., or to clear away dust, dirt, litter, etc., with a broom, brush, or the like.

Sweepverb

To brush swiftly over the surface of anything; to pass with switness and force, as if brushing the surface of anything; to move in a stately manner; as, the wind sweeps across the plain; a woman sweeps through a drawing-room.

Sweepverb

To pass over anything comprehensively; to range through with rapidity; as, his eye sweeps through space.

Sweepnoun

The act of sweeping.

Sweepnoun

The compass or range of a stroke; as, a long sweep.

Sweepnoun

The compass of any turning body or of any motion; as, the sweep of a door; the sweep of the eye.

Sweepnoun

The compass of anything flowing or brushing; as, the flood carried away everything within its sweep.

Sweepnoun

Violent and general destruction; as, the sweep of an epidemic disease.

Sweepnoun

Direction and extent of any motion not rectlinear; as, the sweep of a compass.

Sweepnoun

Direction or departure of a curve, a road, an arch, or the like, away from a rectlinear line.

‘The road which makes a small sweep.’;

Sweepnoun

One who sweeps; a sweeper; specifically, a chimney sweeper.

Sweepnoun

A movable templet for making molds, in loam molding.

Sweepnoun

The mold of a ship when she begins to curve in at the rungheads; any part of a ship shaped in a segment of a circle.

Sweepnoun

The almond furnace.

Sweepnoun

A long pole, or piece of timber, moved on a horizontal fulcrum fixed to a tall post and used to raise and lower a bucket in a well for drawing water.

Sweepnoun

In the game of casino, a pairing or combining of all the cards on the board, and so removing them all; in whist, the winning of all the tricks (thirteen) in a hand; a slam.

Sweepnoun

The sweeping of workshops where precious metals are worked, containing filings, etc.

Sweepnoun

a wide scope;

‘the sweep of the plains’;

Sweepnoun

someone who cleans soot from chimneys

Sweepnoun

winning all or all but one of the tricks in bridge

Sweepnoun

a long oar used in an open boat

Sweepnoun

(American football) an attempt to advance the ball by running around the end of the line

Sweepnoun

a movement in an arc;

‘a sweep of his arm’;

Sweepverb

sweep across or over;

‘Her long skirt brushed the floor’; ‘A gasp swept cross the audience’;

Sweepverb

move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions;

‘The diva swept into the room’; ‘Shreds of paper sailed through the air’; ‘The searchlights swept across the sky’;

Sweepverb

sweep with a broom or as if with a broom;

‘Sweep the crumbs off the table’; ‘Sweep under the bed’;

Sweepverb

force into some kind of situation, condition, or course of action;

‘They were swept up by the events’; ‘don't drag me into this business’;

Sweepverb

to cover or extend over an area or time period;

‘Rivers traverse the valley floor’; ‘The parking lot spans 3 acres’; ‘The novel spans three centuries’;

Sweepverb

clean by sweeping;

‘Please sweep the floor’;

Sweepverb

win an overwhelming victory in or on;

‘Her new show dog swept all championships’;

Sweepverb

cover the entire range of

Sweepverb

make a big sweeping gesture or movement

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