VS.

Supposed vs. To

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Supposedverb

simple past tense and past participle of suppose

Topreposition

Indicating destination: In the direction of, and arriving at.

‘We are walking to the shop.’;

Supposedadjective

Presumed to be true, but without proof

‘Jesus is the supposed son of God.’;

Topreposition

Used to indicate purpose.

‘He devoted himself to education.’; ‘They drank to his health.’;

Supposedadjective

(with infinitive) Generally considered or expected.

‘The movie is supposed to be good.’;

Topreposition

Used to indicate result of action.

‘His face was beaten to a pulp.’;

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Supposedadjective

(with infinitive) Having an obligation.

‘You are not supposed to smoke in the restaurant. [Note: this means, you are obliged not to smoke.]’; ‘The phone is supposed to come with a manual.’;

Topreposition

Used after an adjective to indicate its application.

‘similar to ..., relevant to ..., pertinent to ..., I was nice to him, he was cruel to her, I am used to walking.’;

Supposedadjective

(with infinitive) Intended.

‘The phone is supposed to save us time.''’;

Topreposition

As a.

‘With God to friend (with God as a friend);’; ‘with The Devil to fiend (with the Devil as a foe);’; ‘lambs slaughtered to lake (lambs slaughtered as a sacrifice);’; ‘took her to wife (took her as a wife);’; ‘was sold to slave (was sold as a slave).’;

Supposedadjective

firmly believed;

‘the way things are supposed to be’;

Topreposition

(arithmetic) Used to indicate a ratio or comparison.

‘one to one = 1:1’; ‘ten to one = 10:1.’; ‘I have ten dollars to your four.’;

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Supposedadjective

mistakenly believed;

‘the supposed existence of ghosts’;

Topreposition

(arithmetic) Used to indicate that the preceding term is to be raised to the power of the following value; indicates exponentiation.

‘Three squared or three to the second power is nine.’; ‘Three to the power of two is nine.’; ‘Three to the second is nine.’;

Supposedadjective

commonly put forth or accepted as true on inconclusive grounds;

‘the foundling's putative father’; ‘the reputed (or purported) author of the book’; ‘the supposed date of birth’;

Topreposition

Used to indicate the indirect object.

‘I gave the book to him.’;

Supposedadjective

designed to;

‘medication that is supposed to relieve pain’; ‘what's that gadget supposed to do?’;

Topreposition

(time) Preceding.

‘ten to ten = 9:50; We're going to leave at ten to (the hour).’;

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Supposedadjective

doubtful or suspect;

‘these so-called experts are no help’;

Topreposition

Used to describe what something consists of or contains.

‘Anyone could do this job; there's nothing to it.’; ‘There's a lot of sense to what he says.’;

Supposedadjective

required or under orders;

‘I'm supposed to be there at ten’; ‘he was supposed to go to the store’;

Topreposition

At.

‘Stay where you're to and I'll come find you, b'y.’;

Supposedadjective

based primarily on surmise rather than adequate evidence;

‘theories about the extinction of dinosaurs are still highly conjectural’; ‘the supposed reason for his absence’; ‘suppositious reconstructions of dead languages’; ‘supposititious hypotheses’;

Toadverb

Toward a closed, touching or engaging position.

‘Please push the door to.’;

Supposedadjective

generally assumed or believed to be the case, but not necessarily so

‘people admire their supposed industriousness’;

Toadverb

(nautical) Into the wind.

Toadverb

misspelling of too

Topreposition

The preposition to primarily indicates approach and arrival, motion made in the direction of a place or thing and attaining it, access; and also, motion or tendency without arrival; movement toward; - opposed to from.

‘Stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.’; ‘So to the sylvan lodgeThey came, that like Pomona's arbor smiled.’; ‘I'll to him again, . . . He'll tell me all his purpose.She stretched her arms to heaven.’;

Topreposition

Hence, it indicates motion, course, or tendency toward a time, a state or condition, an aim, or anything capable of being regarded as a limit to a tendency, movement, or action; as, he is going to a trade; he is rising to wealth and honor.

Topreposition

In a very general way, and with innumerable varieties of application, to connects transitive verbs with their remoter or indirect object, and adjectives, nouns, and neuter or passive verbs with a following noun which limits their action. Its sphere verges upon that of for, but it contains less the idea of design or appropriation; as, these remarks were addressed to a large audience; let us keep this seat to ourselves; a substance sweet to the taste; an event painful to the mind; duty to God and to our parents; a dislike to spirituous liquor.

‘Marks and points out each man of us to slaughter.’; ‘Whilst they, distilledAlmost to jelly with the act of fear,Stand dumb and speak not to him.’; ‘Add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge; and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; and to patience godliness; and to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity.’; ‘I have a king's oath to the contrary.’; ‘Numbers were crowded to death.’; ‘Fate and the dooming gods are deaf to tears.’; ‘Go, buckle to the law.’;

Topreposition

As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8).

‘Then longen folk to go on pilgrimages,And palmers for to seeken strange stranders.’;

Topreposition

In many phrases, and in connection with many other words, to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically.

‘We ready are to try our fortunesTo the last man.’; ‘Few of the Esquimaux can count to ten.’;

Topreposition

Effect; end; consequence; as, the prince was flattered to his ruin; he engaged in a war to his cost; violent factions exist to the prejudice of the state.

‘Now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face.’;

Topreposition

Accord; adaptation; as, an occupation to his taste; she has a husband to her mind.

‘He to God's image, she to his was made.’;

Topreposition

Comparison; as, three is to nine as nine is to twenty-seven; it is ten to one that you will offend him.

‘All that they did was piety to this.’;

Topreposition

Addition; union; accumulation.

‘Wisdom he has, and to his wisdom, courage.’;

Topreposition

Accompaniment; as, she sang to his guitar; they danced to the music of a piano.

‘Anon they moveIn perfect phalanx to the Dorian moodOf flutes and soft recorders.’;

Topreposition

Character; condition of being; purpose subserved or office filled.

‘Made his masters and others . . . to consider him to a little wonder.’; ‘To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow;Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.’; ‘There was great showing both to and fro.’;

Topreposition

expressing motion in the direction of (a particular location)

‘we're going to a party’; ‘walking down to the shops’; ‘my first visit to Africa’;

Topreposition

expressing location, typically in relation to a specified point of reference

‘place the cursor to the left of the first word’; ‘forty miles to the south of the site’;

Topreposition

expressing a point reached at the end of a range or after a period of time

‘a drop in profits from £105 m to around £75 m’; ‘from 1938 to 1945’;

Topreposition

(in telling the time) before (the hour specified)

‘it's five to ten’;

Topreposition

approaching or reaching (a particular condition)

‘Christopher's expression changed from amazement to joy’; ‘she was close to tears’;

Topreposition

expressing the result of a process or action

‘smashed to smithereens’;

Topreposition

governing a phrase expressing someone's reaction to something

‘to her astonishment, he smiled’;

Topreposition

identifying the person or thing affected by or receiving something

‘you were terribly unkind to her’; ‘they donated £400 to the hospice’; ‘I am deeply grateful to my parents’;

Topreposition

identifying a particular relationship between one person and another

‘he's economic adviser to the president’; ‘he is married to his cousin Emma’;

Topreposition

used in various phrases to indicate how something is related to something else (often followed by a noun without a determiner)

‘made to order’; ‘a prelude to disaster’;

Topreposition

indicating a rate of return on something, for example the distance travelled in exchange for fuel used

‘my car only does ten miles to the gallon’;

Topreposition

indicating the power (exponent) to which a number is raised

‘ten to the minus thirty-three’;

Topreposition

indicating that two things are attached or linked

‘they are inextricably linked to this island’; ‘he had left his dog tied to a drainpipe’;

Topreposition

concerning or likely to concern (something)

‘a threat to world peace’; ‘a reference to Psalm 22:18’;

Topreposition

used to introduce the second element in a comparison

‘the club's nothing to what it once was’;

Topreposition

placed before a debit entry in accounting.

Toadverb

so as to be closed or nearly closed

‘he pulled the door to behind him’;

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