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Stomp vs. Trample

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Stompverb

(ambitransitive) To trample heavily.

Trampleverb

(transitive) To crush something by walking on it.

‘to trample grass or flowers’;

Stompverb

To severely beat someone physically or figuratively.

Trampleverb

(by extension) To treat someone harshly.

Stompnoun

A deliberate heavy footfall; a stamp.

‘She obliterated the cockroach with one stomp.’;

Trampleverb

(intransitive) To walk heavily and destructively.

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Stompnoun

A dance having a heavy, rhythmic step.

Trampleverb

(by extension) To cause emotional injury as if by trampling.

Stompnoun

The jazz music for this dance.

Tramplenoun

A heavy stepping.

Stompverb

To stamp with the foot.

Tramplenoun

The sound of heavy footsteps.

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Stompnoun

a dance involving a rhythmical stamping step

Trampleverb

To tread under foot; to tread down; to prostrate by treading; as, to trample grass or flowers.

‘Neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet.’;

Stompverb

walk heavily;

‘The men stomped through the snow in their heavy boots’;

Trampleverb

Fig.: To treat with contempt and insult.

Stompverb

tread heavily and noisily, typically in order to show anger

‘Martin stomped off to the spare room’;

Trampleverb

To tread with force and rapidity; to stamp.

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Stompverb

tread heavily or stamp on

‘I stomped on the accelerator’;

Trampleverb

To tread in contempt; - with on or upon.

‘Diogenes trampled on Plato's pride with greater of his own.’;

Stompverb

deliberately trample or tread heavily on

‘Cobb proceeded to kick and stomp him viciously’;

Tramplenoun

The act of treading under foot; also, the sound produced by trampling.

‘The huddling trample of a drove of sheep.’;

Stompverb

stamp (one's feet)

‘the children were stomping their feet’;

Tramplenoun

the sound of heavy treading or stomping;

‘he heard the trample of many feet’;

Stompverb

dance with heavy stamping steps

‘That's the beat I like. You can't really dance to it but you can stomp to it’;

Trampleverb

tread or stomp heavily or roughly;

‘The soldiers trampled across the fields’;

Stompnoun

(in jazz or popular music) a tune or song with a fast tempo and a heavy beat.

Trampleverb

injure by trampling or as if by trampling;

‘The passerby was trampled by an elephant’;

Stompnoun

a lively dance performed to music with a fast tempo and heavy beat, involving stamping

‘their music is perfect for a good old stomp’;

Trampleverb

walk on and flatten;

‘tramp down the grass’; ‘trample the flowers’;

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