VS.

Stomp vs. Stomper

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Stompverb

(ambitransitive) To trample heavily.

Stompernoun

One who stomps.

Stompverb

To severely beat someone physically or figuratively.

Stompernoun

(informal) A thumpingly percussive music track.

Stompnoun

A deliberate heavy footfall; a stamp.

‘She obliterated the cockroach with one stomp.’;

Stompernoun

someone who walks with a heavy noisy gait or who stamps on the ground

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Stompnoun

A dance having a heavy, rhythmic step.

Stompnoun

The jazz music for this dance.

Stompverb

To stamp with the foot.

Stompnoun

a dance involving a rhythmical stamping step

Stompverb

walk heavily;

‘The men stomped through the snow in their heavy boots’;

Stompverb

tread heavily and noisily, typically in order to show anger

‘Martin stomped off to the spare room’;

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Stompverb

tread heavily or stamp on

‘I stomped on the accelerator’;

Stompverb

deliberately trample or tread heavily on

‘Cobb proceeded to kick and stomp him viciously’;

Stompverb

stamp (one's feet)

‘the children were stomping their feet’;

Stompverb

dance with heavy stamping steps

‘That's the beat I like. You can't really dance to it but you can stomp to it’;

Stompnoun

(in jazz or popular music) a tune or song with a fast tempo and a heavy beat.

Stompnoun

a lively dance performed to music with a fast tempo and heavy beat, involving stamping

‘their music is perfect for a good old stomp’;

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