VS.

Stint vs. Skint

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Stintnoun

A period of time spent doing or being something. A spell.

‘He had a stint in jail.’;

Skintadjective

Penniless, poor, impecunious, broke.

Stintnoun

limit; bound; restraint; extent

Skintadjective

(slang) skinned

Stintnoun

Quantity or task assigned; proportion allotted.

Skintadjective

lacking funds;

‘`skint' is a British slang term’;

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Stintnoun

Any of several very small wading birds in the genus Calidris. Types of sandpiper, such as the dunlin or the sanderling.

Stintverb

To stop (an action); cease, desist.

Stintverb

To stop speaking or talking (of a subject).

Stintverb

(intransitive) To be sparing or mean.

‘The next party you throw, don't stint on the beer.’;

Stintverb

(transitive) To restrain within certain limits; to bound; to restrict to a scant allowance.

Stintverb

To assign a certain task to (a person), upon the performance of which he/she is excused from further labour for that day or period; to stent.

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Stintverb

To impregnate successfully; to get with foal; said of mares.

Stintnoun

Any one of several species of small sandpipers, as the sanderling of Europe and America, the dunlin, the little stint of India (Tringa minuta), etc. Called also pume.

Stintnoun

Limit; bound; restraint; extent.

‘God has wrote upon no created thing the utmost stint of his power.’;

Stintnoun

Quantity or task assigned; proportion allotted.

‘His old stint - three thousand pounds a year.’;

Stintverb

To restrain within certain limits; to bound; to confine; to restrain; to restrict to a scant allowance.

‘I shall not go about to extenuate the latitude of the curse upon the earth, or stint it only to the production of weeds.’; ‘She stints them in their meals.’;

Stintverb

To put an end to; to stop.

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Stintverb

To assign a certain (i. e., limited) task to (a person), upon the performance of which one is excused from further labor for the day or for a certain time; to stent.

Stintverb

To serve successfully; to get with foal; - said of mares.

‘The majority of maiden mares will become stinted while at work.’;

Stintverb

To stop; to cease.

‘They can not stint till no thing be left.’; ‘And stint thou too, I pray thee.’; ‘The damsel stinted in her song.’;

Stintnoun

an unbroken period of time during which you do something;

‘there were stretches of boredom’; ‘he did a stretch in the federal penitentiary’;

Stintnoun

smallest American sandpiper

Stintnoun

an individuals prescribed share of work;

‘her stint as a lifeguard exhausted her’;

Stintverb

subsist on a meager allowance;

‘scratch and scrimp’;

Stintverb

supply sparingly and with restricted quantities;

‘sting with the allowance’;

Stintverb

supply a very ungenerous or inadequate amount of (something)

‘stowage room hasn't been stinted’;

Stintverb

restrict (someone) in the amount of something, especially money, given or permitted

‘to avoid having to stint yourself, budget in advance’;

Stintverb

be very economical or mean about spending or providing something

‘he doesn't stint on wining and dining’;

Stintnoun

a person's fixed or allotted period of work

‘his varied career included a stint as a magician’;

Stintnoun

limitation of supply or effort

‘a collector with an eye for quality and the means to indulge it without stint’;

Stintnoun

a small short-legged sandpiper of northern Eurasia and Alaska, with a brownish back and white underparts.

Stint

A stint is one of several very small waders in the paraphyletic assemblage – often separated in Erolia – which in North America are known as peeps. They are scolopacid waders much similar in ecomorphology to their distant relatives, the charadriid plovers.

‘Calidris’;

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