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Squire vs. Armiger — What's the Difference?

Squire vs. Armiger — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Squire and Armiger

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Squire

Starting in the Middle Ages, a squire was the shield- or armour-bearer of a knight.Use of the term evolved over time. Initially, a squire was a knight's apprentice.

Armiger

In heraldry, an armiger is a person entitled to use a heraldic achievement (e.g., bear arms, an "armour-bearer") either by hereditary right, grant, matriculation, or assumption of arms. Such a person is said to be armigerous.

Squire

A man of high social standing who owns and lives on an estate in a rural area, especially the chief landowner in such an area
The squire of Radbourne Hall
Squire Trelawny

Armiger

A bearer of armor for a knight; a squire.

Squire

A young nobleman acting as an attendant to a knight before becoming a knight himself.
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Armiger

A person entitled to bear heraldic arms.

Squire

A subadult snapper fish (Chrysophrys auratus ).

Armiger

An esquire, originally carrying the armour of a knight; hence, later a man of the gentry ranking below a knight.

Squire

(of a man) accompany or escort (a woman)
She was squired around Rome by a reporter

Armiger

Any person entitled to bear a coat of arms.

Squire

A man who attends or escorts a woman; a gallant.

Armiger

Formerly, an armor bearer, as of a knight, an esquire who bore his shield and rendered other services. In later use, one next in degree to a knight, and entitled to armorial bearings. The term is now superseded by esquire.

Squire

An English country gentleman, especially the chief landowner in a district.

Armiger

A squire carrying the armor of a knight

Squire

A magistrate or justice of the peace.

Armiger

A nobleman entitled to bear heraldic arms

Squire

A local dignitary.

Squire

A young nobleman attendant upon a knight and ranked next below a knight in feudal hierarchy.

Squire

To attend as a squire; escort.

Squire

A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.

Squire

A title of dignity next in degree below knight, and above gentleman. See esquire.

Squire

A male attendant on a great personage.

Squire

A devoted attendant or follower of a lady; a beau.

Squire

A title of office and courtesy. See under esquire.

Squire

Term of address to a male equal.

Squire

(obsolete) A ruler; a carpenter's square; a measure.

Squire

(transitive) To attend as a squire.

Squire

(transitive) To attend as a beau, or gallant, for aid and protection.

Squire

A square; a measure; a rule.

Squire

A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.

Squire

A title of dignity next in degree below knight, and above gentleman. See Esquire.

Squire

A male attendant on a great personage; also (Colloq.), a devoted attendant or follower of a lady; a beau.

Squire

A title of office and courtesy. See under Esquire.

Squire

To attend as a squire.

Squire

To attend as a beau, or gallant, for aid and protection; as, to squire a lady.

Squire

Young nobleman attendant on a knight

Squire

An English country landowner

Squire

A man who attends or escorts a woman

Squire

Attend upon as a squire; serve as a squire

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