VS.

Squeeze vs. Press

Published:

Squeezeverb

(transitive) To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

‘I squeezed the ball between my hands.’; ‘Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.’;

Pressnoun

(countable) A device used to apply pressure to an item.

‘a flower press’;

Squeezeverb

(transitive) To embrace closely; to give a tight hug to.

Pressnoun

(countable) A printing machine.

‘Stop the presses!’;

Squeezeverb

(ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place.

‘I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.’; ‘Can you squeeze through that gap?’;

Pressnoun

(uncountable) A collective term for the print-based media (both the people and the newspapers).

‘according to a member of the press;’; ‘This article appeared in the press.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Squeezeverb

(transitive) To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty.

‘He squeezed some money out of his wallet.’;

Pressnoun

(countable) A publisher.

Squeezeverb

(transitive) To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices.

‘I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.’;

Pressnoun

An enclosed storage space (e.g. closet, cupboard).

‘Put the cups in the press.’; ‘Put the ironing in the linen press.’;

Squeezeverb

To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.

Pressnoun

An exercise in which weight is forced away from the body by extension of the arms or legs.

ADVERTISEMENT

Squeezeverb

To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting.

‘Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.’;

Pressnoun

An additional bet in a golf match that duplicates an existing (usually losing) wager in value, but begins even at the time of the bet.

‘He can even the match with a press.’;

Squeezeverb

To press between two bodies; to press together closely; to compress; often, to compress so as to expel juice, moisture, etc.; as, to squeeze an orange with the fingers; to squeeze the hand in friendship.

Pressnoun

(countable) Pure, unfermented grape juice.

‘I would like some Concord press with my meal tonight.’;

Squeezeverb

Fig.: To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass; to crush.

‘In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.’;

Pressnoun

A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Squeezeverb

To force, or cause to pass, by compression; often with out, through, etc.; as, to squeeze water through felt.

Pressnoun

(obsolete) A crowd.

Squeezeverb

To press; to urge one's way, or to pass, by pressing; to crowd; - often with through, into, etc.; as, to squeeze hard to get through a crowd.

Pressverb

(ambitransitive) to exert weight or force against, to act upon with force or weight

Squeezenoun

The act of one who squeezes; compression between bodies; pressure.

Pressverb

(transitive) to compress, squeeze

‘to press fruit for the purpose of extracting the juice’;

Squeezenoun

A facsimile impression taken in some soft substance, as pulp, from an inscription on stone.

Pressverb

(transitive) to clasp, hold in an embrace; to hug

‘She took her son, and press'd’; ‘The illustrious infant to her fragrant breast (Dryden, Illiad, VI. 178.)’;

Squeezenoun

The gradual closing of workings by the weight of the overlying strata.

Pressverb

(transitive) to reduce to a particular shape or form by pressure, especially flatten or smooth

‘to press cloth with an iron’; ‘to press a hat’;

Squeezenoun

Pressure or constraint used to force the making of a gift, concession, or the like; exaction; extortion; as, to put the squeeze on someone.

‘One of the many "squeezes" imposed by the mandarins.’;

Pressverb

To flatten a selected area of fabric using an iron with an up-and-down, not sliding, motion, so as to avoid disturbing adjacent areas.

Squeezenoun

the act of gripping and pressing firmly;

‘he gave her cheek a playful squeeze’;

Pressverb

(transitive) to drive or thrust by pressure, to force in a certain direction

‘to press a crowd back’;

Squeezenoun

a state in which there is a short supply of cash to lend to businesses and consumers and interest rates are high

Pressverb

to weigh upon, oppress, trouble

‘He turns from us;’; ‘Alas, he weeps too! Something presses him’; ‘He would reveal, but dare not.-Sir, be comforted. (Fletcher, Pilgrim, I. 2.)’;

Squeezenoun

a situation in which increased costs cannot be passed on to the customer;

‘increased expenses put a squeeze on profits’;

Pressverb

(transitive) to force to a certain end or result; to urge strongly, impel

Squeezenoun

(slang) a person's girlfriend or boyfriend;

‘she was his main squeeze’;

Pressverb

To try to force (something upon someone); to urge or inculcate.

‘to press the Bible on an audience’;

Squeezenoun

a twisting squeeze;

‘gave the wet cloth a wring’;

Pressverb

(transitive) to hasten, urge onward

‘to press a horse in a race’;

Squeezenoun

an aggressive attempt to compel acquiescence by the concentration or manipulation of power

Pressverb

(transitive) to urge, beseech, entreat

‘God heard their prayers, wherein they earnestly pressed him for the honor of his great name. (Winthrop, Hist. New England, II. 35)’;

Squeezenoun

a tight or amorous embrace;

‘come here and give me a big hug’;

Pressverb

(transitive) to lay stress upon, emphasize

‘If we read but a very little, we naturally want to press it all; if we read a great deal, we are willing not to press the whole of what we read, and we learn what ought to be pressed and what not. (M. Arnold, Literature and Dogma, Pref.)’;

Squeezenoun

the act of forcing yourself (or being forced) into or through a restricted space;

‘getting through that small opening was a tight squeeze’;

Pressverb

(ambitransitive) to throng, crowd

Squeezeverb

to compress with violence, out of natural shape or condition;

‘crush an aluminum can’; ‘squeeze a lemon’;

Pressverb

to print

Squeezeverb

press firmly;

‘He squeezed my hand’;

Pressverb

To force into service, particularly into naval service.

Squeezeverb

squeeze like a wedge into a tight space;

‘I squeezed myself into the corner’;

Pressnoun

An East Indian insectivore (Tupaia ferruginea). It is arboreal in its habits, and has a bushy tail. The fur is soft, and varies from rusty red to maroon and to brownish black.

Squeezeverb

to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :

‘She forced him to take a job in the city’; ‘He squeezed her for information’;

Pressnoun

A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.

‘I have misused the king's press.’;

Squeezeverb

obtain by coercion or intimidation;

‘They extorted money from the executive by threatening to reveal his past to the company boss’; ‘They squeezed money from the owner of the business by threatening him’;

Pressnoun

An apparatus or machine by which any substance or body is pressed, squeezed, stamped, or shaped, or by which an impression of a body is taken; sometimes, the place or building containing a press or presses.

Squeezeverb

press or force;

‘Stuff money into an envelope’; ‘She thrust the letter into his hand’;

Pressnoun

Specifically, a printing press.

Squeezeverb

squeeze tightly between the fingers;

‘He pinched her behind’; ‘She squeezed the bottle’;

Pressnoun

The art or business of printing and publishing; hence, printed publications, taken collectively, more especially newspapers or the persons employed in writing for them; as, a free press is a blessing, a licentious press is a curse.

Squeezeverb

hug, usually with fondness;

‘Hug me, please’; ‘They embraced’;

Pressnoun

An upright case or closet for the safe keeping of articles; as, a clothes press.

Squeezeverb

squeeze or press together;

‘she compressed her lips’; ‘the spasm contracted the muscle’;

Pressnoun

The act of pressing or thronging forward.

‘In their throng and press to that last hold.’;

Pressnoun

Urgent demands of business or affairs; urgency; as, a press of engagements.

Pressnoun

A multitude of individuals crowded together; crowd of single things; a throng.

‘They could not come nigh unto him for the press.’;

Pressverb

To force into service, particularly into naval service; to impress.

‘To peaceful peasant to the wars is pressed.’;

Pressverb

To urge, or act upon, with force, as weight; to act upon by pushing or thrusting, in distinction from pulling; to crowd or compel by a gradual and continued exertion; to bear upon; to squeeze; to compress; as, we press the ground with the feet when we walk; we press the couch on which we repose; we press substances with the hands, fingers, or arms; we are pressed in a crowd.

‘Good measure, pressed down, and shaken together.’;

Pressverb

To squeeze, in order to extract the juice or contents of; to squeeze out, or express, from something.

‘From sweet kernels pressed,She tempers dulcet creams.’; ‘And I took the grapes, and pressed them into Pharaoh's cup, and I gave the cup into Pharaoh's hand.’;

Pressverb

To squeeze in or with suitable instruments or apparatus, in order to compact, make dense, or smooth; as, to press cotton bales, paper, etc.; to smooth by ironing; as, to press clothes.

Pressverb

To embrace closely; to hug.

‘Leucothoe shook at these alarms,And pressed Palemon closer in her arms.’;

Pressverb

To oppress; to bear hard upon.

‘Press not a falling man too far.’;

Pressverb

To straiten; to distress; as, to be pressed with want or hunger.

Pressverb

To exercise very powerful or irresistible influence upon or over; to constrain; to force; to compel.

‘Paul was pressed in the spirit, and testified to the Jews that Jesus was Christ.’;

Pressverb

To try to force (something upon some one); to urge or inculcate with earnestness or importunity; to enforce; as, to press divine truth on an audience.

‘He pressed a letter upon me within this hour.’; ‘Be sure to press upon him every motive.’;

Pressverb

To drive with violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard; as, to press a horse in a race.

‘The posts . . . went cut, being hastened and pressed on, by the king's commandment.’;

Pressverb

To exert pressure; to bear heavily; to push, crowd, or urge with steady force.

Pressverb

To move on with urging and crowding; to make one's way with violence or effort; to bear onward forcibly; to crowd; to throng; to encroach.

‘They pressed upon him for to touch him.’;

Pressverb

To urge with vehemence or importunity; to exert a strong or compelling influence; as, an argument presses upon the judgment.

Pressnoun

newspaper writers and photographers

Pressnoun

the state of urgently demanding notice or attention;

‘the press of business matters’;

Pressnoun

the gathering and publishing of news in the form of newspapers or magazines

Pressnoun

a machine used for printing

Pressnoun

a dense crowd of people

Pressnoun

a tall piece of furniture that provides storage space for clothes; has a door and rails or hooks for hanging clothes

Pressnoun

clamp to prevent wooden rackets from warping when not in use

Pressnoun

any machine that exerts pressure to form or shape or cut materials or extract liquids or compress solids

Pressnoun

a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then smoothly lifted overhead

Pressnoun

the act of pressing; the exertion of pressure;

‘he gave the button a press’; ‘he used pressure to stop the bleeding’; ‘at the pressing of a button’;

Pressverb

exert pressure or force to or upon;

‘He pressed down on the boards’; ‘press your thumb on this spot’;

Pressverb

force or impel in an indicated direction;

‘I urged him to finish his studies’;

Pressverb

to be oppressive or burdensome;

‘weigh heavily on the mind’; ‘Something pressed on his mind’;

Pressverb

place between two surfaces and apply weight or pressure;

‘pressed flowers’;

Pressverb

squeeze or press together;

‘she compressed her lips’; ‘the spasm contracted the muscle’;

Pressverb

crowd closely;

‘The crowds pressed along the street’;

Pressverb

create by pressing;

‘Press little holes into the soft clay’;

Pressverb

be urgent;

‘This is a pressing problem’;

Pressverb

exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for;

‘The liberal party pushed for reforms’; ‘She is crusading for women's rights’; ‘The Dean is pushing for his favorite candidate’;

Pressverb

press from a plastic;

‘press a record’;

Pressverb

make strenuous pushing movements during birth to expel the baby;

‘`Now push hard,' said the doctor to the woman’;

Pressverb

lift weights;

‘This guy can press 300 pounds’;

Pressverb

ask for or request earnestly;

‘The prophet bid all people to become good persons’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons