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Spring vs. Youth — What's the Difference?

Spring vs. Youth — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Spring and Youth

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Spring

To move upward or forward in a single quick motion or a series of such motions; leap
The goat sprang over the log.

Youth

Youth is the time of life when one is young, and often means the time between childhood and adulthood (maturity). It is also defined as "the appearance, freshness, vigor, spirit, etc., characteristic of one who is young".

Spring

To move suddenly, especially because of being resilient or moved by a spring
I let the branch spring forward. The door sprang shut.

Youth

The period between childhood and adult age
He had been a keen sportsman in his youth

Spring

To start doing something suddenly
The firefighters sprang into action.
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Youth

A young man
He was attacked by a gang of youths

Spring

To appear or come into being quickly
New businesses are springing up rapidly.

Youth

The condition or quality of being young
Travel while you still have your youth.

Spring

To issue or emerge suddenly
A cry sprang from her lips. A thought springs to mind.

Youth

The time of life between childhood and maturity
He was rebellious in his youth.

Spring

To arise from a source; develop
Their frustration springs from a misunderstanding.

Youth

An early period of development or existence
A nation in its youth.

Spring

(intransitive) To burst forth.

Youth

A young person, especially a young male in late adolescence.

Spring

(of liquids) To gush, to flow suddenly and violently.
The boat sprang a leak and began to sink.

Youth

(used with a sing. or pl. verb) Young people considered as a group.

Spring

To gush, to flow out of the ground.

Youth

(Geology) The first stage in the erosion cycle.

Spring

(of light) To appear, to dawn.

Youth

(uncountable) The quality or state of being young.
Her youth and beauty attracted him to her.

Spring

(of plants) To sprout, to grow,

Youth

(uncountable) The part of life following childhood; the period of existence preceding maturity or age; the whole early part of life, from childhood, or, sometimes, from infancy, to adulthood.
Make the most of your youth, it will not last forever.
I made many mistakes in my youth, but learned from them all.

Spring

(now chiefly botanical) To grow taller or longer.

Youth

(countable) A young person.
There was a group of youths hanging around the parking lot, reading fashion magazines and listening to music.

Spring

To rise from cover.

Youth

(countable) A young man; a male adolescent or young adult.

Spring

(of landscape) To come dramatically into view.

Youth

Young persons, collectively.

Spring

(figurative) to arise, to come into existence.
Hope springs eternal.
He hit the gas and the car sprang to life.

Youth

The quality or state of being young; youthfulness; juvenility.
Such as in his faceYouth smiled celestial.

Spring

To move with great speed and energy; to leap, to jump; to dart, to sprint; of people: to rise rapidly from a seat, bed, etc.
Deer spring with their hind legs, using their front hooves to steady themselves.
He sprang to his feet.
A bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.
Don't worry. She'll spring back to her cheerful old self in no time.
It was the first thing that sprang to mind.
She sprang to her husband's defense and clocked the protestor.

Youth

The part of life that succeeds to childhood; the period of existence preceding maturity or age; the whole early part of life, from childhood, or, sometimes, from infancy, to manhood.
He wondered that your lordshipWould suffer him to spend his youth at home.
Those who pass their youth in vice are justly condemned to spend their age in folly.

Spring

(usually with from) To be born, descend, or originate from
He sprang from peasant stock.

Youth

A young person; especially, a young man.
Seven youths from Athens yearly sent.

Spring

To descend or originate from.
The Stoics sprang from the Cynics.

Youth

Young persons, collectively.
It is fit to read the best authors to youth first.

Spring

(obsolete) To rise in social position or military rank, to be promoted.

Youth

A young person (especially a young man or boy)

Spring

To become known, to spread.

Youth

Young people collectively;
Rock music appeals to the young
Youth everywhere rises in revolt

Spring

To emit, to spread.

Youth

The time of life between childhood and maturity

Spring

To grow.

Youth

Early maturity; the state of being young or immature or inexperienced

Spring

(transitive) To cause to burst forth.

Youth

An early period of development;
During the youth of the project

Spring

To cause to well up or flow out of the ground.

Youth

The freshness and vitality characteristic of a young person

Spring

To bring forth.

Spring

To cause to become known, to tell of.

Spring

To cause to move energetically; (equestrianism) to cause to gallop, to spur.

Spring

To cause to rise from cover.
His dogs sprang the grouse and partridges and flushed the woodcock.

Spring

To shift quickly from one designated position to another.

Spring

To breed with, to impregnate.

Spring

(of mechanisms) To cause to work or open by sudden application of pressure.
He sprang the trap.

Spring

To make wet, to moisten.

Spring

To rise suddenly, (of tears) to well up.
The documentary made tears spring to their eyes.

Spring

To burst into pieces, to explode, to shatter.

Spring

To go off.

Spring

To cause to explode, to set off, to detonate.

Spring

To crack.

Spring

To have something crack.

Spring

To cause to crack.

Spring

To surprise by sudden or deft action.

Spring

To come upon and flush out

Spring

To catch in an illegal act or compromising position.

Spring

(obsolete) To begin something.

Spring

(obsolete) To produce, provide, or place an item unexpectedly.

Spring

To put bad money into circulation.

Spring

To tell, to share.

Spring

(of news, surprises) To announce unexpectedly, to reveal.
Sorry to spring it on you like this but I've been offered another job.

Spring

To free from imprisonment, especially by facilitating an illegal escape.
His lieutenants hired a team of miners to help spring him.

Spring

To be free of imprisonment, especially by illegal escape.

Spring

To build, to form the initial curve of.
They sprung an arch over the lintel.

Spring

To extend, to curve.
The arches spring from the front posts.

Spring

To turn a vessel using a spring attached to its anchor cable.

Spring

To raise a vessel's sheer.

Spring

To raise a last's toe.

Spring

(transitive) To pay or spend a certain sum, to cough up.

Spring

To raise an offered price.

Spring

To act as a spring: to strongly rebound.

Spring

To equip with springs, especially to equip with a suspension.

Spring

To provide spring or elasticity

Spring

To inspire, to motivate.

Spring

(ambitransitive) To deform owing to excessive pressure, to become warped; to intentionally deform in order to position and then straighten in place.
A piece of timber sometimes springs in seasoning.
He sprang in the slat.

Spring

To reach maturity, to be fully grown.

Spring

To swell with milk or pregnancy.

Spring

To sound, to play.

Spring

(intransitive) To spend the springtime somewhere

Spring

(of animals) to find or get enough food during springtime.

Spring

(countable) An act of springing: a leap, a jump.

Spring

(countable) The season of the year in temperate regions in which plants spring from the ground and into bloom and dormant animals spring to life.
Spring is the time of the year most species reproduce.
You can visit me in the spring, when the weather is bearable.

Spring

(astronomy) The period from the moment of vernal equinox (around March 21 in the Northern Hemisphere) to the moment of the summer solstice (around June 21); the equivalent periods reckoned in other cultures and calendars.
Spring Festival" throughout East Asia because it is reckoned as the beginning of their spring.

Spring

(meteorology) The three months of March, April, and May in the Northern Hemisphere and September, October, and November in the Southern Hemisphere.
I spent my spring holidays in Morocco.
The spring issue will be out next week.

Spring

The time of something's growth; the early stages of some process.

Spring

A period of political liberalization and democratization
Arab Spring

Spring

Someone with ivory or peach skin tone and eyes and hair that are not extremely dark, seen as best suited to certain colors of clothing.

Spring

(countable) Something which springs, springs forth, springs up, or springs back, particularly

Spring

(geology) A spray or body of water springing from the ground.
This beer was brewed with pure spring water.

Spring

The rising of the sea at high tide.

Spring

(oceanography) nodot=a, the especially high tide shortly after full and new moons.
Neap tide

Spring

A mechanical device made of flexible or coiled material that exerts force and attempts to spring back when bent, compressed, or stretched.
We jumped so hard the bed springs broke.

Spring

(nautical) A line from a vessel's end or side to its anchor cable used to diminish or control its movement.

Spring

(nautical) A line laid out from a vessel's end to the opposite end of an adjacent vessel or mooring to diminish or control its movement.
You should put a couple of springs onto the jetty to stop the boat moving so much.

Spring

(figurative) A race, a lineage.

Spring

(figurative) A youth.

Spring

A shoot, a young tree.

Spring

A grove of trees; a forest.

Spring

An erection of the penis. en

Spring

A crack which has sprung up in a mast, spar, or (rare) a plank or seam.

Spring

(uncountable) Springiness: an attribute or quality of springing, springing up, or springing back, particularly

Spring

Elasticity: the property of a body springing back to its original form after compression, stretching, etc.
The spring of a bow

Spring

Elastic energy, power, or force.

Spring

(countable) The source from which an action or supply of something springs.

Spring

(countable) Something which causes others or another to spring forth or spring into action, particularly

Spring

A cause, a motive, etc.

Spring

(obsolete) A lively piece of music.

Spring

To leap; to bound; to jump.
The mountain stag that springsFrom height to height, and bounds along the plains.

Spring

To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.
And sudden lightSprung through the vaulted roof.

Spring

To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.
Watchful as fowlers when their game will spring.

Spring

To fly back; as, a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.

Spring

To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning.

Spring

To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; - often followed by up, forth, or out.
Till well nigh the day began to spring.
To satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth.
Do not blast my springing hopes.
O, spring to light; auspicious Babe, be born.

Spring

To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.
[They found] new hope to springOut of despair, joy, but with fear yet linked.

Spring

To grow; to thrive; to prosper.
What makes all this, but Jupiter the king,At whose command we perish, and we spring?

Spring

To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant.

Spring

To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a surprise on someone; to spring a joke.
She starts, and leaves her bed, and springs a light.
The friends to the cause sprang a new project.

Spring

To cause to explode; as, to spring a mine.

Spring

To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken; as, to spring a mast or a yard.

Spring

To cause to close suddenly, as the parts of a trap operated by a spring; as, to spring a trap.

Spring

To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; - often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar.

Spring

To pass over by leaping; as, to spring a fence.

Spring

To release (a person) from confinement, especially from a prison.

Spring

A leap; a bound; a jump.
The prisoner, with a spring, from prison broke.

Spring

A flying back; the resilience of a body recovering its former state by its elasticity; as, the spring of a bow.

Spring

Elastic power or force.
Heavens! what a spring was in his arm!

Spring

An elastic body of any kind, as steel, India rubber, tough wood, or compressed air, used for various mechanical purposes, as receiving and imparting power, diminishing concussion, regulating motion, measuring weight or other force.

Spring

Any source of supply; especially, the source from which a stream proceeds; an issue of water from the earth; a natural fountain.

Spring

Any active power; that by which action, or motion, is produced or propagated; cause; origin; motive.
Our author shuns by vulgar springs to moveThe hero's glory, or the virgin's love.

Spring

That which springs, or is originated, from a source;

Spring

That which causes one to spring; specifically, a lively tune.

Spring

The season of the year when plants begin to vegetate and grow; the vernal season, usually comprehending the months of March, April, and May, in the middle latitudes north of the equator.

Spring

The time of growth and progress; early portion; first stage; as, the spring of life.
O how this spring of love resemblethThe uncertain glory of an April day.

Spring

A crack or fissure in a mast or yard, running obliquely or transversely.

Spring

The season of growth;
The emerging buds were a sure sign of spring
He will hold office until the spring of next year

Spring

A natural flow of ground water

Spring

A metal elastic device that returns to its shape or position when pushed or pulled or pressed;
The spring was broken

Spring

A light springing movement upwards or forwards

Spring

The elasticity of something that can be stretched and returns to its original length

Spring

A point at which water issues forth

Spring

Move forward by leaps and bounds;
The horse bounded across the meadow
The child leapt across the puddle
Can you jump over the fence?

Spring

Develop into a distinctive entity;
Our plans began to take shape

Spring

Spring back; spring away from an impact;
The rubber ball bounced
These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide

Spring

Produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;
He sprang a new haircut on his wife

Spring

Develop suddenly;
The tire sprang a leak

Spring

Produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;
He sprang these news on me just as I was leaving

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