VS.

Sort vs. Sorted

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Sortnoun

A general type.

Sortedverb

simple past tense and past participle of sort

Sortnoun

Manner; form of being or acting.

Sortedadjective

Put into some order by sorting.

‘a sorted list of numbers’;

Sortnoun

(obsolete) Condition above the vulgar; rank.

Sortedadjective

In good order, under control.

‘I have to get my life sorted.’;

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Sortnoun

(informal) A person evaluated in a certain way (bad, good, strange, etc.).

Sortedadjective

In possession of a sufficient supply, especially of narcotics.

‘Sorted for E's & Wizz (song and album by UK band Pulp)’;

Sortnoun

(dated) Group, company.

Sortedinterjection

A general expression of approval.

Sortnoun

A good-looking woman.

Sortedadjective

arranged according to size

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Sortnoun

An act of sorting.

‘I had a sort of my cupboard.’;

Sortedadjective

arranged into groups

Sortnoun

(computing) An algorithm for sorting a list of items into a particular sequence.

‘Popular algorithms for sorts include quicksort and heapsort.’;

Sortnoun

(typography) A piece of metal type used to print one letter, character, or symbol in a particular size and style.

Sortnoun

(mathematics) A type.

Sortnoun

(obsolete) Chance; lot; destiny.

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Sortnoun

(obsolete) A full set of anything, such as a pair of shoes, or a suit of clothes.

Sortverb

(transitive) To separate items into different categories according to certain criteria that determine their sorts.

‘Sort the letters in those bags into a separate pile for each language that you recognise; sort the rest into a common pile for later attention.’;

Sortverb

(transitive) To arrange into some sequence, usually numerically, alphabetically or chronologically.

‘Sort those bells into a row in ascending sequence of pitch: lowest tones on the left; highest on the right.’;

Sortverb

(transitive) To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.

Sortverb

To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.

Sortverb

To choose from a number; to select; to cull.

Sortverb

(intransitive) To join or associate with others, especially with others of the same kind or species; to agree.

Sortverb

(intransitive) To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.

Sortverb

To fix a problem or handle a task; to sort out.

Sortnoun

Chance; lot; destiny.

‘By aventure, or sort, or cas [chance].’; ‘Let blockish Ajax drawThe sort to fight with Hector.’;

Sortnoun

A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or things characterized by the same or like qualities; a class or order; as, a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems.

Sortnoun

Manner; form of being or acting.

‘Which for my part I covet to perform,In sort as through the world I did proclaim.’; ‘Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt nor seen well by those that wear them.’; ‘I'll deceive you in another sort.’; ‘To Adam in what sortShall I appear?’; ‘I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style.’;

Sortnoun

Condition above the vulgar; rank.

Sortnoun

A chance group; a company of persons who happen to be together; a troop; also, an assemblage of animals.

‘A boy, a child, and we a sort of us,Vowed against his voyage.’;

Sortnoun

A pair; a set; a suit.

Sortnoun

Letters, figures, points, marks, spaces, or quadrats, belonging to a case, separately considered.

‘As when the total kindOf birds, in orderly array on wing,Came summoned over Eden to receiveTheir names of there.’; ‘None of noble sortWould so offend a virgin.’;

Sortverb

To separate, and place in distinct classes or divisions, as things having different qualities; as, to sort cloths according to their colors; to sort wool or thread according to its fineness.

‘Rays which differ in refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another.’;

Sortverb

To reduce to order from a confused state.

Sortverb

To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.

‘Shellfish have been, by some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insects.’; ‘She sorts things present with things past.’;

Sortverb

To choose from a number; to select; to cull.

‘That he may sort out a worthy spouse.’; ‘I'll sort some other time to visit you.’;

Sortverb

To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.

‘I pray thee, sort thy heart to patience.’;

Sortverb

To join or associate with others, esp. with others of the same kind or species; to agree.

‘Nor do metals only sort and herd with metals in the earth, and minerals with minerals.’; ‘The illiberality of parents towards children makes them base, and sort with any company.’;

Sortverb

To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.

‘They are happy whose natures sort with their vocations.’; ‘Things sort not to my will.’; ‘I can not tell you precisely how they sorted.’;

Sortnoun

a category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality;

‘sculpture is a form of art’; ‘what kinds of desserts are there?’;

Sortnoun

an approximate definition or example;

‘she wore a sort of magenta dress’; ‘she served a creamy sort of dessert thing’;

Sortnoun

a person of a particular character or nature;

‘what sort of person is he?’; ‘he's a good sort’;

Sortnoun

an operation that segregates items into groups according to a specified criterion;

‘the bottleneck in mail delivery it the process of sorting’;

Sortverb

examine in order to test suitability;

‘screen these samples’; ‘screen the job applicants’;

Sortverb

arrange or order by classes or categories;

‘How would you classify these pottery shards--are they prehistoric?’;

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