VS.

Smatter vs. Smattering

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Smatterverb

(intransitive) To talk superficially; to babble, chatter.

Smatteringnoun

A superficial or shallow knowledge of a subject.

‘She knows a smattering of Greek, but not enough to carry on a conversation.’;

Smatterverb

(transitive) To speak (a language) with spotty or superficial knowledge.

Smatteringnoun

A small number or amount of something.

‘There’s only a smattering of people who oppose the first amendment.’;

Smatterverb

To study or approach superficially; to dabble in.

Smatteringnoun

A slight, superficial knowledge of something; sciolism.

‘I had a great desire, not able to attain to a superficial skill in any, to have some smattering in all.’;

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Smatterverb

To have a slight taste, or a slight, superficial knowledge, of anything; to smack.

Smatteringnoun

a small number or amount;

‘only a handful of responses were received’;

Smatternoun

A smattering small number or amount.

‘a smatter of applause’;

Smatteringnoun

a slight or superficial understanding of a subject

Smatternoun

A smattering superficial knowledge.

Smatterverb

To talk superficially or ignorantly; to babble; to chatter.

‘Of state affairs you can not smatter.’;

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Smatterverb

To have a slight taste, or a slight, superficial knowledge, of anything; to smack.

Smatterverb

To talk superficially about.

Smatterverb

To gain a slight taste of; to acquire a slight, superficial knowledge of; to smack.

Smatternoun

Superficial knowledge; a smattering.

Smatterverb

work with in a non-serious manner;

‘She dabbles in astronomy’; ‘He plays around with investments bu he never makes any money’;

Smatterverb

to talk foolishly;

‘The two women babbled and crooned at the baby’;

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Smatterverb

speak with spotty or superficial knowledge;

‘She smatters Russian’;

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