VS.

Slight vs. Slender

Published:

Slightadjective

Small in amount, gentle, or weak; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.

‘a slight (i.e. feeble) effort;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not deep) impression;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not convincing) argument;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not thorough) examination;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not severe) pain;’; ‘in the slight future (i.e. the very near future)’;

Slenderadjective

Thin; slim.

‘A rod is a long slender pole used for angling.’;

Slightadjective

Not stout or heavy; slender.

‘a slight but graceful woman’;

Slenderadjective

(figurative) meagre; deficient

‘Being a person of slender means, he was unable to afford any luxuries.’;

Slightadjective

(regional) Even, smooth or level; still (of the sea).

‘A slight stone’; ‘The sea was slight and calm’;

Slenderadjective

(Gaelic languages) Palatalized.

ADVERTISEMENT

Slightadjective

(obsolete) Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.

Slenderadjective

Small or narrow in proportion to the length or the height; not thick; slim; as, a slender stem or stalk of a plant.

‘She, as a veil down to the slender waist,Her unadorned golden tresses wore.’;

Slightadjective

Bad, of poor quality (as goods).

‘A gullible chapman was fooled into buying really slight goods.’;

Slenderadjective

Weak; feeble; not strong; slight; as, slender hope; a slender constitution.

‘Mighty hearts are held in slender chains.’; ‘They have inferred much from slender premises.’; ‘The slender utterance of the consonants.’;

Slightadjective

(dated) Slighting; treating with disdain.

Slenderadjective

Moderate; trivial; inconsiderable; slight; as, a man of slender intelligence.

‘A slender degree of patience will enable him to enjoy both the humor and the pathos.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Slightverb

(transitive) To treat as slight or not worthy of attention; to make light of.

Slenderadjective

Small; inadequate; meager; pitiful; as, slender means of support; a slender pittance.

‘Frequent begging makes slender alms.’;

Slightverb

(transitive) To give lesser weight or importance to.

Slenderadjective

Spare; abstemious; frugal; as, a slender diet.

‘The good Ostorius often deignedTo grace my slender table with his presence.’;

Slightverb

(transitive) To treat with disdain or neglect, usually out of prejudice, hatred, or jealousy; to ignore disrespectfully.

Slenderadjective

Uttered with a thin tone; - the opposite of broad; as, the slender vowels long e and i.

ADVERTISEMENT

Slightverb

(intransitive) To act negligently or carelessly.

Slenderadjective

being of delicate or slender build;

‘she was slender as a willow shoot is slender’; ‘a slim girl with straight blonde hair’; ‘watched her slight figure cross the street’;

Slightverb

To render no longer defensible by full or partial demolition.

Slenderadjective

very narrow;

‘a thin line across the page’;

Slightverb

(transitive) To make even or level.

Slenderadjective

having little width in proportion to the length or height;

‘a slender pole’;

Slightverb

(transitive) To throw heedlessly.

Slenderadjective

small in quantity;

‘slender wages’; ‘a slim chance of winning’; ‘a small surplus’;

Slightnoun

The act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.

Slenderadjective

gracefully slender; moving and bending with ease

Slightnoun

(obsolete) Sleight.

Slenderadjective

(of a person or part of the body) gracefully thin

‘her slender neck’;

Slightnoun

Sleight.

Slightnoun

The act of slighting; the manifestation of a moderate degree of contempt, as by neglect or oversight; neglect; indignity.

Slenderadjective

(of something abstract) barely sufficient in amount or basis

‘people of slender means’; ‘a slender majority of four’;

Slightverb

To overthrow; to demolish.

Slightverb

To make even or level.

Slightverb

To throw heedlessly.

‘The rogue slighted me into the river.’;

Slightverb

To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands.

‘The wretch who slights the bounty of the skies.’; ‘Beware . . . lest the like befall . . . If they transgress and slight that sole command.’; ‘This my long-sufferance, and my day of grace,Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste.’;

Slightadjective

Not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe; weak; gentle; - applied in a great variety of circumstances; as, a slight (i. e., feeble) effort; a slight (i. e., perishable) structure; a slight (i. e., not deep) impression; a slight (i. e., not convincing) argument; a slight (i. e., not thorough) examination; slight (i. e., not severe) pain, and the like.

‘Slight is the subject, but not so the praise.’; ‘Some firmly embrace doctrines upon slight grounds.’;

Slightadjective

Not stout or heavy; slender.

‘His own figure, which was formerly so slight.’;

Slightadjective

Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.

Slightadverb

Slightly.

‘Think not so slight of glory.’;

Slightnoun

a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval)

Slightverb

pay no attention to, disrespect;

‘She cold-shouldered her ex-fiance’;

Slightadjective

having little substance or significance;

‘a flimsy excuse’; ‘slight evidence’; ‘a tenuous argument’; ‘a thin plot’;

Slightadjective

almost no or (with `a') at least some; very little;

‘there's slight chance that it will work’; ‘there's a slight chance it will work’;

Slightadjective

being of delicate or slender build;

‘she was slender as a willow shoot is slender’; ‘a slim girl with straight blonde hair’; ‘watched her slight figure cross the street’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons