VS.

Slight vs. Faint

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Slightadjective

Small in amount, gentle, or weak; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe.

‘a slight (i.e. feeble) effort;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not deep) impression;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not convincing) argument;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not thorough) examination;’; ‘a slight (i.e. not severe) pain;’; ‘in the slight future (i.e. the very near future)’;

Faintadjective

(of a being) Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to lose consciousness

‘I felt faint after my fifth gin and tonic.’;

Slightadjective

Not stout or heavy; slender.

‘a slight but graceful woman’;

Faintadjective

Lacking courage, spirit, or energy; cowardly; dejected

Slightadjective

(regional) Even, smooth or level; still (of the sea).

‘A slight stone’; ‘The sea was slight and calm’;

Faintadjective

Barely perceptible; not bright, or loud, or sharp

‘There was a faint red light in the distance.’;

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Slightadjective

(obsolete) Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.

Faintadjective

Performed, done, or acted, weakly; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy

‘faint efforts’; ‘faint resistance’;

Slightadjective

Bad, of poor quality (as goods).

‘A gullible chapman was fooled into buying really slight goods.’;

Faintadjective

Slight; minimal.

Slightadjective

(dated) Slighting; treating with disdain.

Faintnoun

The act of fainting, syncope.

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Slightverb

(transitive) To treat as slight or not worthy of attention; to make light of.

Faintnoun

(rare) The state of one who has fainted; a swoon.

Slightverb

(transitive) To give lesser weight or importance to.

Faintverb

(intransitive) To lose consciousness through a lack of oxygen or nutrients to the brain, usually as a result of suddenly reduced blood flow (may be caused by emotional trauma, loss of blood or various medical conditions).

Slightverb

(transitive) To treat with disdain or neglect, usually out of prejudice, hatred, or jealousy; to ignore disrespectfully.

Faintverb

(intransitive) To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.

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Slightverb

(intransitive) To act negligently or carelessly.

Faintverb

(intransitive) To decay; to disappear; to vanish.

Slightverb

To render no longer defensible by full or partial demolition.

Faintadjective

Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst.

Slightverb

(transitive) To make even or level.

Faintadjective

Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed; as, "Faint heart ne'er won fair lady."

Slightverb

(transitive) To throw heedlessly.

Faintadjective

Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak; as, a faint color, or sound.

Slightnoun

The act of slighting; a deliberate act of neglect or discourtesy.

Faintadjective

Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight; as, faint efforts; faint resistance.

‘The faint prosecution of the war.’;

Slightnoun

(obsolete) Sleight.

Faintnoun

The act of fainting, or the state of one who has fainted; a swoon. [R.] See Fainting, n.

‘The saint,Who propped the Virgin in her faint.’;

Slightnoun

Sleight.

Faintverb

To become weak or wanting in vigor; to grow feeble; to lose strength and color, and the control of the bodily or mental functions; to swoon; - sometimes with away. See Fainting, n.

‘Hearing the honor intended her, she fainted away.’; ‘If I send them away fasting . . . they will faint by the way.’;

Slightnoun

The act of slighting; the manifestation of a moderate degree of contempt, as by neglect or oversight; neglect; indignity.

Faintverb

To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.

‘If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy strength is small.’;

Slightverb

To overthrow; to demolish.

Faintverb

To decay; to disappear; to vanish.

‘Gilded clouds, while we gaze upon them, faint before the eye.’;

Slightverb

To make even or level.

Faintverb

To cause to faint or become dispirited; to depress; to weaken.

‘It faints me to think what follows.’;

Slightverb

To throw heedlessly.

‘The rogue slighted me into the river.’;

Faintnoun

a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain

Slightverb

To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands.

‘The wretch who slights the bounty of the skies.’; ‘Beware . . . lest the like befall . . . If they transgress and slight that sole command.’; ‘This my long-sufferance, and my day of grace,Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste.’;

Faintverb

pass out from weakness, physical or emotional distress due to a loss of blood supply to the brain

Slightadjective

Not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe; weak; gentle; - applied in a great variety of circumstances; as, a slight (i. e., feeble) effort; a slight (i. e., perishable) structure; a slight (i. e., not deep) impression; a slight (i. e., not convincing) argument; a slight (i. e., not thorough) examination; slight (i. e., not severe) pain, and the like.

‘Slight is the subject, but not so the praise.’; ‘Some firmly embrace doctrines upon slight grounds.’;

Faintadjective

barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc;

‘a faint outline’; ‘the wan sun cast faint shadows’; ‘the faint light of a distant candle’; ‘faint colors’; ‘a faint hissing sound’; ‘a faint aroma’;

Slightadjective

Not stout or heavy; slender.

‘His own figure, which was formerly so slight.’;

Faintadjective

lacking clarity or distinctness;

‘a dim figure in the distance’; ‘only a faint recollection’; ‘shadowy figures in the gloom’; ‘saw a vague outline of a building through the fog’; ‘a few wispy memories of childhood’;

Slightadjective

Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.

Faintadjective

lacking strength or vigor;

‘damning with faint praise’; ‘faint resistance’; ‘feeble efforts’; ‘a feeble voice’;

Slightadverb

Slightly.

‘Think not so slight of glory.’;

Faintadjective

weak and likely to lose consciousness;

‘suddenly felt faint from the pain’; ‘was sick and faint from hunger’; ‘felt light in the head’; ‘a swooning fit’; ‘light-headed with wine’; ‘light-headed from lack of sleep’;

Slightnoun

a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval)

Faintadjective

indistinctly understood or felt or perceived;

‘a faint clue to the origin of the mystery’; ‘haven't the faintest idea’;

Slightverb

pay no attention to, disrespect;

‘She cold-shouldered her ex-fiance’;

Faintadjective

lacking conviction or boldness or courage;

‘faint heart ne'er won fair lady’;

Slightadjective

having little substance or significance;

‘a flimsy excuse’; ‘slight evidence’; ‘a tenuous argument’; ‘a thin plot’;

Slightadjective

almost no or (with `a') at least some; very little;

‘there's slight chance that it will work’; ‘there's a slight chance it will work’;

Slightadjective

being of delicate or slender build;

‘she was slender as a willow shoot is slender’; ‘a slim girl with straight blonde hair’; ‘watched her slight figure cross the street’;

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