VS.

Slack vs. Slacken

Published:

Slacknoun

(uncountable) Small coal; coal dust.

Slackenverb

(intransitive) To gradually decrease in intensity or tautness; to become slack.

‘The pace slackened.’;

Slacknoun

(countable) A valley, or small, shallow dell.

Slackenverb

(transitive) To make slack, less taut, or less intense.

‘slacken the rope’;

Slacknoun

(uncountable) The part of anything that hangs loose, having no strain upon it.

‘the slack of a rope or of a sail’;

Slackenverb

To deprive of cohesion by combining chemically with water; to slake.

‘to slacken lime’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Slacknoun

(countable) A tidal marsh or shallow, that periodically fills and drains.

Slackennoun

A spongy, semivitrifled substance which miners or smelters mix with the ores of metals to prevent their fusion.

Slackadjective

Lax; not tense; not hard drawn; not firmly extended.

‘a slack rope’;

Slackenverb

become slow or slower;

‘Production slowed’;

Slackadjective

Weak; not holding fast.

‘a slack hand’;

Slackenverb

make less active or fast;

‘He slackened his pace as he got tired’; ‘Don't relax your efforts now’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Slackadjective

Remiss; backward; not using due diligence or care; not earnest or eager.

‘slack in duty or service’;

Slackenverb

become looser or slack;

‘the rope slackened’;

Slackadjective

Not violent, rapid, or pressing.

‘Business is slack.’;

Slackenverb

make slack as by lessening tension or firmness

Slackadjective

vulgar; sexually explicit, especially in dancehall music

Slackadverb

Slackly.

‘slack dried hops’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Slackverb

To slacken.

Slackverb

(obsolete) To mitigate; to reduce the strength of.

Slackverb

(followed by “off”) to procrastinate; to be lazy

Slackverb

(followed by “off”) to refuse to exert effort

Slackverb

To lose cohesion or solidity by a chemical combination with water; to slake.

‘Lime slacks.’;

Slacknoun

Small coal; also, coal dust; culm.

Slacknoun

A valley, or small, shallow dell.

Slacknoun

The part of anything that hangs loose, having no strain upon it; as, the slack of a rope or of a sail.

Slackadjective

Lax; not tense; not hard drawn; not firmly extended; as, a slack rope.

Slackadjective

Weak; not holding fast; as, a slack hand.

Slackadjective

Remiss; backward; not using due diligence or care; not earnest or eager; as, slack in duty or service.

‘The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness.’;

Slackadjective

Not violent, rapid, or pressing; slow; moderate; easy; as, business is slack.

‘C sar . . . about sunset, hoisting sail with a slack southwest, at midnight was becalmed.’;

Slackadverb

Slackly; as, slack dried hops.

Slackverb

To become slack; to be made less tense, firm, or rigid; to decrease in tension; as, a wet cord slackens in dry weather.

Slackverb

To be remiss or backward; to be negligent.

Slackverb

To lose cohesion or solidity by a chemical combination with water; to slake; as, lime slacks.

Slackverb

To abate; to become less violent.

‘Whence these raging firesWill slacken, if his breath stir not their flames.’;

Slackverb

To lose rapidity; to become more slow; as, a current of water slackens.

Slackverb

To languish; to fail; to flag.

Slackverb

To end; to cease; to desist; to slake.

‘That through your death your lineage should slack.’; ‘They will not of that firste purpose slack.’;

Slackverb

To render slack; to make less tense or firm; as, to slack a rope; to slacken a bandage.

Slackverb

To neglect; to be remiss in.

‘Slack not the pressage.’;

Slackverb

To deprive of cohesion by combining chemically with water; to slake; as, to slack lime.

Slackverb

To cause to become less eager; to repress; to make slow or less rapid; to retard; as, to slacken pursuit; to slacken industry.

‘I should be grieved, young prince, to think my presenceUnbent your thoughts, and slackened 'em to arms.’; ‘In this business of growing rich, poor men should slack their pace.’; ‘With such delayWell plased, they slack their course.’;

Slackverb

To cause to become less intense; to mitigate; to abate; to ease.

‘To respite, or deceive, or slack thy painOf this ill mansion.’;

Slacknoun

dust consisting of a mixture of small coal fragments and coal dust and dirt that sifts out when coal is passed over a sieve

Slacknoun

a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality;

‘the team went into a slump’; ‘a gradual slack in output’; ‘a drop-off in attendance’; ‘a falloff in quality’;

Slacknoun

a stretch of water without current or movement;

‘suddenly they were in slack water’;

Slacknoun

the condition of being loose (not taut);

‘he hadn't counted on the slackness of the rope’;

Slacknoun

a cord or rope or cable that is hanging loosely;

‘he took up the slack’;

Slackverb

avoid responsibilities and work, be idle

Slackverb

be inattentive to, or neglect;

‘He slacks his attention’;

Slackverb

release tension on;

‘slack the rope’;

Slackverb

make less active or fast;

‘He slackened his pace as he got tired’; ‘Don't relax your efforts now’;

Slackverb

become slow or slower;

‘Production slowed’;

Slackverb

make less active or intense

Slackverb

become less in amount or intensity;

‘The storm abated’; ‘The rain let up after a few hours’;

Slackverb

cause to heat and crumble by treatment with water;

‘slack lime’;

Slackadjective

not tense or taut;

‘the old man's skin hung loose and gray’; ‘slack and wrinkled skin’; ‘slack sails’; ‘a slack rope’;

Slackadjective

lacking in strength or firmness or resilience;

‘flaccid muscles’; ‘took his lax hand in hers’; ‘gave a limp handshake’; ‘a limp gesture as if waving away all desire to know’; ‘a slack grip’;

Slackadjective

flowing with little speed as e.g. at the turning of the tide;

‘slack water’;

Slackadjective

lacking in rigor or strictness;

‘such lax and slipshod ways are no longer acceptable’; ‘lax in attending classes’; ‘slack in maintaining discipline’;

Slackadjective

not taut or held tightly in position; loose

‘a slack rope’; ‘her mouth went slack’;

Slackadjective

(of business or trade) characterized by a lack of work or activity; quiet

‘business was rather slack’;

Slackadjective

slow or sluggish

‘they were working at a slack pace’;

Slackadjective

having or showing laziness or negligence

‘slack accounting procedures’;

Slackadjective

lewd

‘the veteran king of slack chat’;

Slackadjective

having many sexual encounters or relationships (typically used of a woman).

Slackadjective

(of a tide) neither ebbing nor flowing

‘soon the water will become slack, and the tide will turn’; ‘slack tides’;

Slacknoun

the part of a rope or line which is not held taut; the loose or unused part

‘I picked up the rod and wound in the slack’;

Slacknoun

casual trousers

‘he put on a grey shirt and loose cotton slacks’;

Slacknoun

a spell of inactivity or laziness

‘he slept deeply, refreshed by a little slack in the daily routine’;

Slacknoun

coal dust or small pieces of coal

‘the fire was stoked with a mixture of slack and cement’;

Slackverb

loosen (something, especially a rope)

‘slacking the outhaul allows you to adjust the sail’;

Slackverb

decrease or reduce in intensity, quantity, or speed

‘the horse slacked his pace’; ‘the flow of blood slacked off’;

Slackverb

work slowly or lazily

‘she ticked off her girls if they were slacking’;

Slackverb

slake (lime)

‘150 sacks of lime were slacked by the inrushing water’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons