VS.

Sing vs. Sink

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Singverb

(intransitive) To produce musical or harmonious sounds with one’s voice.

‘"I really want to sing in the school choir," said Vera.’;

Sinkverb

To move or be moved into something.

Singverb

(transitive) To express audibly by means of a harmonious vocalization.

Sinkverb

(ergative) To descend or submerge (or to cause to do so) into a liquid or similar substance.

‘A stone sinks in water.’; ‘The sun gradually sank in the west.’;

Singverb

(transitive) To soothe with singing.

‘to sing somebody to sleep’;

Sinkverb

(transitive) To cause a vessel to sink, generally by making it no longer watertight.

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Singverb

To confess under interrogation.

Sinkverb

(transitive) To push (something) into something.

‘The joint will hold tighter if you sink a wood screw through both boards.’; ‘The dog sank its teeth into the delivery man's leg.’;

Singverb

To make a small, shrill sound.

‘The air sings in passing through a crevice.’; ‘a singing kettle’;

Sinkverb

To pot; hit a ball into a pocket or hole.

Singverb

To relate in verse; to celebrate in poetry.

Sinkverb

To diminish or be diminished.

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Singverb

(intransitive) To display fine qualities; to stand out as excellent.

‘The sauce really makes this lamb sing.’;

Sinkverb

To experience apprehension, disappointment, dread, or momentary depression.

Singverb

(ergative) To be capable of being sung; to produce a certain effect by being sung.

Sinkverb

To cause to decline; to depress or degrade.

‘to sink one's reputation’;

Singnoun

A gathering at which people sing songs.

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To demean or lower oneself; to do something below one's status, standards, or morals.

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Singverb

To utter sounds with musical inflections or melodious modulations of voice, as fancy may dictate, or according to the notes of a song or tune, or of a given part (as alto, tenor, etc.) in a chorus or concerted piece.

‘The noise of them that sing do I hear.’;

Sinkverb

To conceal and appropriate.

Singverb

To utter sweet melodious sounds, as birds do.

‘On every bough the briddes heard I sing.’; ‘Singing birds, in silver cages hung.’;

Sinkverb

To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

Singverb

To make a small, shrill sound; as, the air sings in passing through a crevice.

‘O'er his head the flying spearSang innocent, and spent its force in air.’;

Sinkverb

To reduce or extinguish by payment.

‘to sink the national debt’;

Singverb

To tell or relate something in numbers or verse; to celebrate something in poetry.

‘Bid her . . . singOf human hope by cross event destroyed.’;

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fail in strength.

Singverb

To cry out; to complain.

‘They should sing if thet they were bent.’;

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

Singverb

To utter with musical inflections or modulations of voice.

‘And they sing the song of Moses, the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb.’; ‘And in the darkness sing your carol of high praise.’;

Sinknoun

A basin used for holding water for washing

Singverb

To celebrate in song; to give praises to in verse; to relate or rehearse in numbers, verse, or poetry.

‘Arms and the man I sing.’; ‘The last, the happiest British king,Whom thou shalt paint or I shall sing.’;

Sinknoun

A drain for carrying off wastewater

Singverb

To influence by singing; to lull by singing; as, to sing a child to sleep.

Sinknoun

(geology) A sinkhole

Singverb

To accompany, or attend on, with singing.

‘I heard them singing home the bride.’;

Sinknoun

A depression in land where water collects, with no visible outlet

Singverb

deliver by singing;

‘Sing Christmas carols’;

Sinknoun

A heat sink

Singverb

produce tones with the voice;

‘She was singing while she was cooking’; ‘My brother sings very well’;

Sinknoun

A place that absorbs resources or energy

Singverb

to make melodious sounds;

‘The nightingale was singing’;

Sinknoun

(baseball) The motion of a sinker pitch

‘Jones' has a two-seamer with heavy sink.’;

Singverb

make a whining, ringing, or whistling sound;

‘the kettle was singing’; ‘the bullet sang past his ear’;

Sinknoun

An object or callback that captures events; event sink

Singverb

divulge confidential information or secrets;

‘Be careful--his secretary talks’;

Sinknoun

(graph theory) a destination vertex in a transportation network

Singverb

make musical sounds with the voice, especially words with a set tune

‘Bella sang to the baby’;

Sinkverb

To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

‘I sink in deep mire.’;

Singverb

perform (a song, words, or tune) by making musical sounds with the voice

‘I asked her to sing some carols’;

Sinkverb

To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.

‘The stone sunk into his forehead.’;

Singverb

sing in accompaniment to a song or piece of music

‘we sing along to all the songs’;

Sinkverb

Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.

‘Let these sayings sink down into your ears.’;

Singverb

call something out loudly

‘he sang out a greeting’;

Sinkverb

To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.

‘I think our country sinks beneath the yoke.’; ‘He sunk down in his chariot.’; ‘Let not the fire sink or slacken.’;

Singverb

(of a bird) make characteristic melodious whistling and twittering sounds

‘the birds were singing in the trees’;

Sinkverb

To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

‘The Alps and Pyreneans sink before him.’;

Singverb

make a high-pitched whistling or buzzing sound

‘the kettle was beginning to sing’;

Sinkverb

To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.

‘[The Athenians] fell upon the wings and sank a single ship.’;

Singverb

(of a person's ear) be affected with a continuous buzzing sound, especially as the after-effect of a blow or loud noise

‘a stinging slap that made my ear sing’;

Sinkverb

Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.

‘I raise of sink, imprison or set free.’; ‘If I have a conscience, let it sink me.’; ‘Thy cruel and unnatural lust of powerHas sunk thy father more than all his years.’;

Singverb

act as an informer to the police

‘as soon as he got put under pressure, he sang like a canary’;

Sinkverb

To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die.

Singverb

recount or celebrate in poetry or other literature

‘poetry should sing the variety of the human race’; ‘these poets sing of the American experience’;

Sinkverb

To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.

‘You sunk the river repeated draughts.’;

Singverb

compose poetry

‘he knew Himself to sing, and build the lofty rhyme’;

Sinkverb

To conseal and appropriate.

‘If sent with ready money to buy anything, and you happen to be out of pocket, sink the money, and take up the goods on account.’;

Singnoun

an act or spell of singing

‘we asked him to come back and have a bit of a sing’; ‘a sponsored sing to pay for the theatre’;

Sinkverb

To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

‘A courtly willingness to sink obnoxious truths.’;

Singnoun

a meeting for amateur singing.

Sinkverb

To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.

Sinknoun

A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.

Sinknoun

A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen.

Sinknoun

A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole.

Sinknoun

The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River.

Sinknoun

plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe

Sinknoun

(technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system;

‘the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide’;

Sinknoun

a depression in the ground communicating with a subterranean passage (especially in limestone) and formed by solution or by collapse of a cavern roof

Sinknoun

a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it

Sinkverb

fall or drop to a lower place or level;

‘He sank to his knees’;

Sinkverb

cause to sink;

‘The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor’;

Sinkverb

pass into a specified state or condition;

‘He sank into Nirvana’;

Sinkverb

go under,

‘The raft sank and its occupants drowned’;

Sinkverb

descend into or as if into some soft substance or place;

‘He sank into bed’; ‘She subsided into the chair’;

Sinkverb

appear to move downward;

‘The sun dipped below the horizon’; ‘The setting sun sank below the tree line’;

Sinkverb

fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly;

‘The real estate market fell off’;

Sinkverb

fall or sink heavily;

‘He slumped onto the couch’; ‘My spirits sank’;

Sinkverb

embed deeply;

‘She sank her fingers into the soft sand’; ‘He buried his head in her lap’;

Sinkverb

go down below the surface of something, especially of a liquid; become submerged

‘he saw the coffin sink below the surface of the waves’;

Sinkverb

(of a ship) go to the bottom of the sea or some other body of water because of damage or a collision

‘the trawler sank with the loss of all six crew’;

Sinkverb

cause (a ship) to sink

‘a freak wave sank their boat near the shore’;

Sinkverb

fail and not be seen or heard of again

‘the film sank virtually without trace’;

Sinkverb

cause to fail

‘this pledge could sink the government’;

Sinkverb

conceal, keep in the background, or ignore

‘they agreed to sink their differences’;

Sinkverb

descend from a higher to a lower position; drop downwards

‘you can relax on the veranda as the sun sinks low’;

Sinkverb

(of a person) lower oneself or drop down gently

‘she sank back on to her pillow’;

Sinkverb

gradually penetrate into the surface of something

‘her feet sank into the thick pile of the carpet’;

Sinkverb

gradually decrease or decline in value, amount, quality, or intensity

‘their output sank to a third of the pre-war figure’;

Sinkverb

lapse or fall into a particular state or condition

‘he sank into a coma after suffering a brain haemorrhage’;

Sinkverb

approach death

‘the doctor concluded that the lad was sinking fast’;

Sinkverb

insert beneath a surface

‘rails fixed in place with screws sunk below the surface of the wood’;

Sinkverb

cause something sharp to penetrate (a surface)

‘the dog sank its teeth into her arm’;

Sinkverb

push or thrust (an object) into something

‘Kelly stood watching, her hands sunk deep into her pockets’;

Sinkverb

excavate (a well) or bore (a shaft) vertically downwards

‘they planned to sink a gold mine in Oklahoma’;

Sinkverb

hit (a ball) into a hole in golf or snooker

‘he sank the black into the green pocket to secure victory’;

Sinkverb

(in golf) hit the ball into the hole with (a putt or other shot)

‘he sank a four-foot birdie putt at the fifth hole’;

Sinkverb

rapidly consume (an alcoholic drink)

‘English players sinking a few post-match lagers’;

Sinknoun

a fixed basin with a water supply and outflow pipe

‘a sink unit with cupboard and drawers under’; ‘I stood at the kitchen sink’;

Sinknoun

a pool or marsh in which a river's water disappears by evaporation or percolation.

Sinknoun

a body or process which acts to absorb or remove energy or a particular component from a system

‘a heat sink’; ‘the oceans can act as a sink for CO₂’;

Sinknoun

short for sinkhole

Sinknoun

a place of vice or corruption

‘a sink of unnatural vice, pride, and luxury’;

Sinknoun

a school or estate situated in a socially deprived area

‘the local sink school’; ‘a sink estate’;

Sink

A sink – also known by other names including sinker, washbowl, hand basin, wash basin, and simply basin – is a bowl-shaped plumbing fixture used for washing hands, dishwashing, and other purposes. Sinks have taps (faucets) that supply hot and cold water and may include a spray feature to be used for faster rinsing.

Sing Illustrations

Sink Illustrations

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