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Sigh vs. Breathe — What's the Difference?

Sigh vs. Breathe — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Sigh and Breathe

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Sigh

Emit a long, deep audible breath expressing sadness, relief, tiredness, or similar
Harry sank into a chair and sighed with relief

Breathe

Take air into the lungs and then expel it, especially as a regular physiological process
He breathed out heavily
Breathe in through your nose
She was breathing deeply
We are polluting the air we breathe

Sigh

A long, deep audible exhalation expressing sadness, relief, tiredness, or similar
The councils heaved a sigh of relief when they saved over £6m between them
She let out a long sigh of despair

Breathe

To inhale and exhale air using the lungs
Use a snorkel to breathe while swimming.

Sigh

To exhale audibly in a long deep breath, as in weariness or relief.
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Breathe

To inhale air or another gas
Breathe in slowly.

Sigh

To emit a similar sound
Willows sighing in the wind.

Breathe

To exhale air or another gas
I breathed on the window and fogged it up.

Sigh

To feel longing or grief; yearn
Sighing for their lost youth.

Breathe

To exchange gases as part of respiration or photosynthesis
Fish breathe with their gills. Stomata allow leaves to breathe.

Sigh

To express with or as if with an audible exhalation.

Breathe

To use air in combustion
Leave space so the fire can breathe.
Replace the air filter so the engine can breathe.

Sigh

(Archaic) To lament.

Breathe

To be alive; live
A nicer person has never breathed.

Sigh

The act or sound of sighing.

Breathe

To pause to rest or regain breath
Give me a moment to breathe.

Sigh

(intransitive) To inhale a larger quantity of air than usual, and immediately expel it; to make a deep single audible respiration, especially as the result or involuntary expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like.
When she saw it wasn't damaged, she sighed with relief.
He sighed. It was going to be a long night.
He sighed over the lost opportunity.

Breathe

To move or blow gently
A soft wind breathes through the pines.

Sigh

(intransitive) To lament; to grieve.

Breathe

To allow air to pass through
A natural fabric that breathes.

Sigh

(transitive) To utter sighs over; to lament or mourn over.

Breathe

To be exhaled or emanated, as a fragrance.

Sigh

(intransitive) To make a sound like sighing.

Breathe

To be manifested or suggested, as an idea or feeling
A sense of hope breathes from these poems.

Sigh

(transitive) To exhale (the breath) in sighs.
She sighed a sigh that was nearly a groan.
Sigh a note and sing a note

Breathe

To reach fullness of flavor and aroma through exposure to air. Used chiefly of wine.

Sigh

(transitive) To express by sighs; to utter in or with sighs.
"I guess I have no choice," she sighed.
She sighed her frustrations.

Breathe

To inhale and exhale (air or a gas such as oxygen) during respiration.

Sigh

A deep, prolonged audible inhale and exhale of breath; as when fatigued, frustrated, grieved, or relieved; the act of sighing.

Breathe

To inhale (an aroma, for example)
Breathe the lush scent of lilacs.

Sigh

(figurative) a manifestation of grief; a lament.

Breathe

To exhale or blow out
The dragon breathed fire on the village.

Sigh

(Cockney rhyming slang) A person who is bored.

Breathe

To take in or exchange (air or gases)
Plants breathe carbon dioxide.

Sigh

An expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like, often used in casual written contexts.
Sigh, I'm so bored at work today.

Breathe

To impart or instill
An artist who knows how to breathe life into a portrait.

Sigh

To inhale a larger quantity of air than usual, and immediately expel it; to make a deep single audible respiration, especially as the result or involuntary expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, or the like.

Breathe

To utter, especially quietly
Don't breathe a word of this.

Sigh

Hence, to lament; to grieve.
He sighed deeply in his spirit.

Breathe

To make apparent or manifest; suggest
Their manner breathed self-satisfaction.

Sigh

To make a sound like sighing.
And the coming wind did roar more loud,And the sails did sigh like sedge.
The winter winds are wearily sighing.

Breathe

To allow (a person or animal) to rest or regain breath.

Sigh

To exhale (the breath) in sighs.
Never man sighed truer breath.

Breathe

(Linguistics) To utter with a voiceless exhalation of air.

Sigh

To utter sighs over; to lament or mourn over.
Ages to come, and men unborn,Shall bless her name, and sigh her fate.

Breathe

To draw in (air) for combustion.

Sigh

To express by sighs; to utter in or with sighs.
They . . . sighed forth proverbs.
The gentle swain . . . sighs back her grief.

Breathe

(intransitive) To draw air into (inhale), and expel air from (exhale), the lungs in order to extract oxygen and excrete waste gases.

Sigh

A deep and prolonged audible inspiration or respiration of air, as when fatigued or grieved; the act of sighing.
I could drive the boat with my sighs.

Breathe

(intransitive) To take in needed gases and expel waste gases in a similar way.
Fish have gills so they can breathe underwater.

Sigh

Figuratively, a manifestation of grief; a lan ent.
With their sighs the airFrequenting, sent from hearts contrite.

Breathe

(transitive) To inhale (a gas) to sustain life.
While life as we know it depends on oxygen, scientists have speculated that alien life forms might breathe chlorine or methane.

Sigh

An utterance made by exhaling audibly

Breathe

To live.
I will not allow it, as long as I still breathe.

Sigh

A sound like a person sighing;
She heard the sigh of the wind in the trees

Breathe

(transitive) To draw something into the lungs.
Try not to breathe too much smoke.

Sigh

Heave or utter a sigh; breathe deeply and heavily;
She sighed sadly

Breathe

(intransitive) To expel air from the lungs, exhale.
If you breathe on a mirror, it will fog up.

Sigh

Utter with a sigh

Breathe

(transitive) To exhale or expel (something) in the manner of breath.
The flowers breathed a heady perfume.

Breathe

(transitive) To give an impression of, to exude.
The decor positively breathes classical elegance.

Breathe

(transitive) To whisper quietly.
He breathed the words into her ear, but she understood them all.

Breathe

To pass like breath; noiselessly or gently; to emanate; to blow gently.
The wind breathes through the trees.

Breathe

To inspire (scripture).

Breathe

(intransitive) To exchange gases with the environment.
Garments made of certain new materials breathe well and keep the skin relatively dry during exercise.

Breathe

To rest; to stop and catch one's breath.

Breathe

(transitive) To stop, to give a horse an opportunity to catch its breath.
At higher altitudes you need to breathe your horse more often.

Breathe

(transitive) To exercise; to tire by brisk exercise.

Breathe

To passionately devote much of one's life to (an activity, etc.).
Do you like hiking?
Are you kidding? I breathe hiking.

Breathe

To respire; to inhale and exhale air; hence;, to live.
Breathes there a man with soul so deadWho never to himself hath said,This is my own, my native land!

Breathe

To take breath; to rest from action.
Well! breathe awhile, and then to it again!

Breathe

To pass like breath; noiselessly or gently; to exhale; to emanate; to blow gently.
The air breathes upon us here most sweetly.
There breathes a living fragrance from the shore.

Breathe

To inhale and exhale in the process of respiration; to respire.
To view the light of heaven, and breathe the vital air.

Breathe

To inject by breathing; to infuse; - with into.
Able to breathe life into a stone.
And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life.

Breathe

To emit or utter by the breath; to utter softly; to whisper; as, to breathe a vow.
He softly breathed thy name.
Or let the church, our mother, breathe her curse,A mother's curse, on her revolting son.

Breathe

To exhale; to emit, as breath; as, the flowers breathe odors or perfumes.

Breathe

To express; to manifest; to give forth.
Others articles breathe the same severe spirit.

Breathe

To act upon by the breath; to cause to sound by breathing.

Breathe

To promote free respiration in; to exercise.
And every man should beat thee. I think thou wast created for men to breathe themselves upon thee.

Breathe

To suffer to take breath, or recover the natural breathing; to rest; as, to breathe a horse.
A moment breathed his panting steed.

Breathe

To put out of breath; to exhaust.
Mr. Tulkinghorn arrives in his turret room, a little breathed by the journey up.

Breathe

To utter without vocality, as the nonvocal consonants.
The same sound may be pronounces either breathed, voiced, or whispered.
Breathed elements, being already voiceless, remain unchanged [in whispering].

Breathe

Draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs;
I can breathe better when the air is clean
The patient is respiring

Breathe

Be alive;
Every creature that breathes

Breathe

Impart as if by breathing;
He breathed new life into the old house

Breathe

Allow the passage of air through;
Our new synthetic fabric breathes and is perfect for summer wear

Breathe

Utter or tell;
Not breathe a word

Breathe

Manifest or evince;
She breathes the Christian spirit

Breathe

Take a short break from one's activities in order to relax

Breathe

Reach full flavor by absorbing air and being let to stand after having been uncorked;
This rare Bordeaux must be allowed to breathe for at least 2 hours

Breathe

Expel (gases or odors)

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