VS.

Shed vs. Coop

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Shedverb

To part, separate or divide.

‘To shed something in two.’; ‘To shed the sheep from the lambs.’; ‘A metal comb shed her golden hair.’; ‘We are shed with each other by an enormous distance.’;

Coopnoun

A basket, pen or enclosure for birds or small animals.

Shedverb

(ambitransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.

‘You must shed your fear of the unknown before you can proceed.’; ‘When we found the snake, it was in the process of shedding its skin.’;

Coopnoun

A wickerwork basket (kipe) or other enclosure for catching fish.

Shedverb

To pour; to make flow.

Coopnoun

A narrow place of confinement, a cage; a jail, a prison.

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Shedverb

(transitive) To allow to flow or fall.

‘I didn't shed many tears when he left me.’; ‘A tarpaulin sheds water.’;

Coopnoun

(obsolete) A barrel or cask for holding liquids.

Shedverb

(transitive) To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.

‘Can you shed any light on this problem?’;

Coopnoun

A cart with sides and ends made from boards, enabling it to carry manure, etc.

Shedverb

To pour forth, give off, impart.

Coopnoun

A cart which opens at the back to release its load; a tumbril.

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Shedverb

To fall in drops; to pour.

Coopnoun

(Scotland) A small heap.

Shedverb

To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.

Coopnoun

alternative form of co-op.

Shedverb

(weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

Coopverb

(transitive) To keep in a coop.

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Shednoun

(weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.

Coopverb

(transitive) To shut up or confine in a narrow space; to cramp.

Shednoun

(obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.

Coopverb

To unlawfully confine one or more voters to prevent them from casting their ballots in an election.

Shednoun

(obsolete) A parting in the hair.

Coopverb

Of a police officer: to sleep or relax while on duty.

Shednoun

(obsolete) The top of the head.

Coopverb

To make or repair barrels, casks and other wooden vessels; to work upon in the manner of a cooper.

Shednoun

(obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.

Coopnoun

A barrel or cask for liquor.

Shednoun

A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.

‘a wagon shed; a wood shed; a garden shed’;

Coopnoun

An inclosure for keeping small animals; a pen; especially, a grated box for confining poultry.

Shednoun

A large temporary open structure for reception of goods.

Coopnoun

A cart made close with boards; a tumbrel.

Shednoun

An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.

Coopverb

To confine in a coop; hence, to shut up or confine in a narrow compass; to cramp; - usually followed by up, sometimes by in.

‘The Trojans cooped within their walls so long.’; ‘The contempt of all other knowledge . . . coops the understanding up within narrow bounds.’;

Shednoun

A British Rail Class 66 locomotive.

Coopverb

To work upon in the manner of a cooper.

Shednoun

A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure often open in front; an outbuilding; a hut; as, a wagon shed; a wood shed.

‘The first Aletes born in lowly shed.’; ‘Sheds of reeds which summer's heat repel.’;

Coopnoun

a farm building for housing poultry

Shednoun

A covered structure for housing aircraft; a hangar.

Coopnoun

an enclosure made or wire or metal bars in which birds or animals are kept

Shednoun

A parting; a separation; a division.

‘They say also that the manner of making the shed of newwedded wives' hair with the iron head of a javelin came up then likewise.’;

Coopnoun

a cage or pen in which poultry are kept.

Shednoun

The act of shedding or spilling; - used only in composition, as in bloodshed.

Coopnoun

a basket used in catching fish.

Shednoun

That which parts, divides, or sheds; - used in composition, as in watershed.

Coopverb

confine in a small space

‘being cooped up indoors all day makes him fidgety’;

Shednoun

The passageway between the threads of the warp through which the shuttle is thrown, having a sloping top and bottom made by raising and lowering the alternate threads.

Coopverb

put or keep (poultry) in a cage or pen

‘our free-range chickens roam the barnyard instead of staying cooped up in a henhouse’;

Shedverb

To separate; to divide.

Shedverb

To part with; to throw off or give forth from one's self; to emit; to diffuse; to cause to emanate or flow; to pour forth or out; to spill; as, the sun sheds light; she shed tears; the clouds shed rain.

‘Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?’; ‘Twice seven consenting years have shedTheir utmost bounty on thy head.’;

Shedverb

To let fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast; as, fowls shed their feathers; serpents shed their skins; trees shed leaves.

Shedverb

To cause to flow off without penetrating; as, a tight roof, or covering of oiled cloth, sheeds water.

Shedverb

To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.

Shedverb

To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

Shedverb

To fall in drops; to pour.

‘Such a rain down from the welkin shadde.’;

Shedverb

To let fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope.

‘White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.’;

Shednoun

an outbuilding with a single story; used for shelter or storage

Shedverb

get rid of;

‘he shed his image as a pushy boss’; ‘shed your clothes’;

Shedverb

pour out in drops or small quantities or as if in drops or small quantities;

‘shed tears’; ‘spill blood’; ‘God shed His grace on Thee’;

Shedverb

cause or allow (a solid substance) to flow or run out or over;

‘spill the beans all over the table’;

Shedverb

cast off hair, skin, horn, or feathers;

‘out dog sheds every Spring’;

Shedadjective

shed at an early stage of development;

‘most amphibians have caducous gills’; ‘the caducous calyx of a poppy’;

Shednoun

a simple roofed structure used for garden storage, to shelter animals, or as a workshop

‘a bicycle shed’; ‘a garden shed’;

Shednoun

a larger structure for storing or maintaining vehicles or other machinery

‘a shed is required for the three engines’;

Shednoun

a building for shearing sheep or milking cattle.

Shedverb

park (a vehicle) in a depot

‘the buses were temporarily shedded in that depot’;

Shedverb

(of a tree or other plant) allow (leaves or fruit) to fall to the ground

‘both varieties shed leaves in winter’;

Shedverb

(of a reptile, insect, etc.) allow (its skin or shell) to come off, to be replaced by another one that has grown underneath.

Shedverb

(of a mammal) lose (hair) as a result of moulting, disease, or age.

Shedverb

take off (clothes)

‘we shed our jackets’;

Shedverb

have the property of repelling (water or a similar substance).

Shedverb

discard (something undesirable, superfluous, or outdated)

‘many firms use relocation as an opportunity to shed jobs’;

Shedverb

cast or give off (light)

‘the full moon shed a watery light on the scene’;

Shedverb

accidentally allow (something) to fall off or spill

‘a lorry shed its load of steel bars’;

Shedverb

eliminate part of (an electrical power load) by disconnecting circuits.

Shed

A shed is typically a simple, single-story roofed structure in a back garden or on an allotment that is used for storage, hobbies, or as a workshop. Sheds vary considerably in their size and complexity of construction, from simple open-sided ones designed to cover bicycles or garden items to large wood-framed structures with shingled roofs, windows, and electrical outlets.

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