VS.

Shallow vs. Narrow

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Shallowadjective

Having little depth; significantly less deep than wide.

‘This crater is relatively shallow.’; ‘Saute the onions in a shallow pan.’;

Narrowadjective

Having a small width; not wide; having opposite edges or sides that are close, especially by comparison to length or depth.

‘a narrow hallway’;

Shallowadjective

Extending not far downward.

‘The water is shallow here.’;

Narrowadjective

Of little extent; very limited; circumscribed.

Shallowadjective

Concerned mainly with superficial matters.

‘It was a glamorous but shallow lifestyle.’;

Narrowadjective

(figuratively) Restrictive; without flexibility or latitude.

‘a narrow interpretation’;

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Shallowadjective

Lacking interest or substance.

‘The acting is good, but the characters are shallow.’;

Narrowadjective

Contracted; of limited scope; bigoted

‘a narrow mind’; ‘narrow views’;

Shallowadjective

Not intellectually deep; not penetrating deeply; simple; not wise or knowing.

‘shallow learning’;

Narrowadjective

Having a small margin or degree.

‘a narrow escape’; ‘The Republicans won by a narrow majority.’;

Shallowadjective

(obsolete) Not deep in tone.

Narrowadjective

(dated) Limited as to means; straitened

‘narrow circumstances’;

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Shallowadjective

(tennis) Not far forward, close to the net

Narrowadjective

Parsimonious; niggardly; covetous; selfish.

Shallownoun

A shallow portion of an otherwise deep body of water.

‘The ship ran aground in an unexpected shallow.’;

Narrowadjective

Scrutinizing in detail; close; accurate; exact.

Shallownoun

A fish, the rudd.

Narrowadjective

(phonetics) Formed (as a vowel) by a close position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate; or (according to Bell) by a tense condition of the pharynx; distinguished from wide.

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Shallowverb

(ambitransitive) To make or become less deep.

Narrownoun

A narrow passage, especially a contracted part of a stream, lake, or sea; a strait connecting two bodies of water.

‘the Narrows of New York harbor’;

Shallowadjective

Not deep; having little depth; shoal.

Narrowverb

(transitive) To reduce in width or extent; to contract.

‘We need to narrow the search.’;

Shallowadjective

Not deep in tone.

‘The sound perfecter and not so shallow and jarring.’;

Narrowverb

(intransitive) To get narrower.

‘The road narrows.’;

Shallowadjective

Not intellectually deep; not profound; not penetrating deeply; simple; not wise or knowing; ignorant; superficial; as, a shallow mind; shallow learning.

‘The king was neither so shallow, nor so ill advertised, as not to perceive the intention of the French king.’; ‘Deep versed in books, and shallow in himself.’;

Narrowverb

(of a person or eyes) To partially lower one's eyelids in a way usually taken to suggest a defensive, aggressive or penetrating look.

‘He stepped in front of me, narrowing his eyes to slits.’; ‘She wagged her finger in his face, and her eyes narrowed.’;

Shallownoun

A place in a body of water where the water is not deep; a shoal; a flat; a shelf.

‘A swift stream is not heard in the channel, but upon shallows of gravel.’; ‘Dashed on the shallows of the moving sand.’;

Narrowverb

(knitting) To contract the size of, as a stocking, by taking two stitches into one.

Shallownoun

The rudd.

Narrowverb

To convert to a data type that cannot hold as many distinct values.

‘to narrow an int variable to a short variable’;

Shallowverb

To make shallow.

Narrowadjective

Of little breadth; not wide or broad; having little distance from side to side; as, a narrow board; a narrow street; a narrow hem.

‘Hath passed in safety through the narrow seas.’;

Shallowverb

To become shallow, as water.

Narrowadjective

Of little extent; very limited; circumscribed.

‘The Jews were but a small nation, and confined to a narrow compass in the world.’;

Shallownoun

a stretch of shallow water

Narrowadjective

Having but a little margin; having barely sufficient space, time, or number, etc.; close; near{5}; - with special reference to some peril or misfortune; as, a narrow shot; a narrow escape; a narrow miss; a narrow majority.

Shallowverb

make shallow;

‘The silt shallowed the canal’;

Narrowadjective

Limited as to means; straitened; pinching; as, narrow circumstances.

Shallowverb

become shallow;

‘the lake shallowed over time’;

Narrowadjective

Contracted; of limited scope; illiberal; bigoted; as, a narrow mind; narrow views.

Shallowadjective

lacking physical depth; having little spatial extension downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or outward from a center;

‘shallow water’; ‘a shallow dish’; ‘a shallow cut’; ‘a shallow closet’; ‘established a shallow beachhead’; ‘hit the ball to shallow left field’;

Narrowadjective

Parsimonious; niggardly; covetous; selfish.

‘A very narrow and stinted charity.’;

Shallowadjective

not deep or strong; not affecting one deeply;

‘shallow breathing’; ‘a night of shallow fretful sleep’; ‘in a shallow trance’;

Narrowadjective

Scrutinizing in detail; close; accurate; exact.

‘But first with narrow search I must walk roundThis garden, and no corner leave unspied.’;

Shallowadjective

lacking depth of intellect or knowledge; concerned only with what is obvious;

‘shallow people’; ‘his arguments seemed shallow and tedious’;

Narrowadjective

Formed (as a vowel) by a close position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate; or (according to Bell) by a tense condition of the pharynx; - distinguished from wide; as ē (ēve) and Ō (fŌd), etc., from ĭ (ĭll) and Ŏ (fŎt), etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, 13.

Narrownoun

A narrow passage; esp., a contracted part of a stream, lake, or sea; a strait connecting two bodies of water; - usually in the plural; as, The Narrows of New York harbor.

‘Near the island lay on one side the jaws of a dangerousnarrow.’;

Narrowverb

To lessen the breadth of; to contract; to draw into a smaller compass; to reduce the width or extent of.

Narrowverb

To contract the reach or sphere of; to make less liberal or more selfish; to limit; to confine; to restrict; as, to narrow one's views or knowledge; to narrow a question in discussion.

‘Our knowledge is much more narrowed if we confine ourselves to our own solitary reasonings.’;

Narrowverb

To contract the size of, as a stocking, by taking two stitches into one.

Narrowverb

To become less broad; to contract; to become narrower; as, the sea narrows into a strait.

Narrowverb

Not to step out enough to the one hand or the other; as, a horse narrows.

Narrowverb

To contract the size of a stocking or other knit article, by taking two stitches into one.

Narrownoun

a narrow strait connecting two bodies of water

Narrowverb

make or become more narrow or restricted;

‘The selection was narrowed’; ‘The road narrowed’;

Narrowverb

define clearly;

‘I cannot narrow down the rules for this game’;

Narrowverb

become more special;

‘We specialize in dried flowers’;

Narrowverb

become tight or as if tight;

‘Her throat constricted’;

Narrowadjective

not wide;

‘a narrow bridge’; ‘a narrow line across the page’;

Narrowadjective

limited in size or scope;

‘the narrow sense of a word’;

Narrowadjective

lacking tolerance or flexibility or breadth of view;

‘a brilliant but narrow-minded judge’; ‘narrow opinions’;

Narrowadjective

very limited in degree;

‘won by a narrow margin’; ‘a narrow escape’;

Narrowadjective

characterized by painstaking care and detailed examination;

‘a minute inspection of the grounds’; ‘a narrow scrutiny’; ‘an exact and minute report’;

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