VS.

Sequence vs. Ordinal

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Sequencenoun

A set of things next to each other in a set order; a series

Ordinaladjective

Indicating position in a sequence.

Sequencenoun

A series of musical phrases where a theme or melody is repeated, with some change each time, such as in pitch or length (example: opening of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony).

Ordinaladjective

(taxonomy) Pertaining to a taxon at the rank of order.

Sequencenoun

A musical composition used in some Catholic Masses between the readings. The most famous sequence is the Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) formerly used in funeral services.

Ordinaladjective

(nautical) Intercardinal.

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Sequencenoun

(mathematics) An ordered list of objects, typically indexed with natural numbers.

Ordinalnoun

An ordinal number such as first, second and third.

Sequencenoun

A subsequent event; a consequence or result.

Ordinalnoun

A book used in the ordination of Anglican ministers, or in certain Roman Catholic services

Sequencenoun

A series of shots that depict a single action or style in a film, television show etc.

Ordinaladjective

Indicating order or succession; as, the ordinal numbers, first, second, third, etc. Contrasted to cardinal.

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Sequencenoun

(card games) A meld consisting of three or more cards of successive ranks in the same suit, such as the four, five and six of hearts.

Ordinaladjective

Of or pertaining to an order.

Sequenceverb

(transitive) to arrange in an order

Ordinalnoun

A word or number denoting order or succession.

Sequenceverb

(transitive) to determine the order of things, especially of amino acids in a protein, or of bases in a nucleic acid

Ordinalnoun

The book of forms for making, ordaining, and consecrating bishops, priests, and deacons.

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Sequenceverb

(transitive) to produce (music) with a sequencer

Ordinalnoun

A book containing the rubrics of the Mass.

Sequencenoun

The state of being sequent; succession; order of following; arrangement.

‘How art thou a kingBut by fair sequence and succession?’; ‘Sequence and series of the seasons of the year.’;

Ordinalnoun

the number designating place in an ordered sequence

Sequencenoun

That which follows or succeeds as an effect; sequel; consequence; result.

‘The inevitable sequences of sin and punishment.’;

Ordinaladjective

of or relating to a taxonomic order;

‘family and ordinal names of animals and plants’;

Sequencenoun

Simple succession, or the coming after in time, without asserting or implying causative energy; as, the reactions of chemical agents may be conceived as merely invariable sequences.

Ordinaladjective

being or denoting a numerical order in a series;

‘ordinal numbers’; ‘held an ordinal rank of seventh’;

Sequencenoun

Any succession of chords (or harmonic phrase) rising or falling by the regular diatonic degrees in the same scale; a succession of similar harmonic steps.

Sequencenoun

A hymn introduced in the Mass on certain festival days, and recited or sung immediately before the gospel, and after the gradual or introit, whence the name.

‘Originally the sequence was called a Prose, because its early form was rhythmical prose.’;

Sequencenoun

Three or more cards of the same suit in immediately consecutive order of value; as, ace, king, and queen; or knave, ten, nine, and eight.

Sequencenoun

the specific order of any linear arrangement of items; as, the sequence of amino acid residues in a protein; the sequence of instructions in a computer program; the sequence of acts in a variety show.

Sequenceverb

to determine the sequence of; as, to sequence a protein or a DNA fragment.

Sequencenoun

serial arrangement in which things follow in logical order or a recurrent pattern;

‘the sequence of names was alphabetical’; ‘he invented a technique to determine the sequence of base pairs in DNA’;

Sequencenoun

a following of one thing after another in time;

‘the doctor saw a sequence of patients’;

Sequencenoun

film consisting of a succession of related shots that develop a given subject in a movie

Sequencenoun

the action of following in order;

‘he played the trumps in sequence’;

Sequencenoun

several repetitions of a melodic phrase in different keys

Sequenceverb

arrange in a sequence

Sequenceverb

determine the order of constituents in;

‘They sequenced the human genome’;

Sequencenoun

a particular order in which related things follow each other

‘the poems should be read in sequence’; ‘the content of the programme should follow a logical sequence’;

Sequencenoun

a repetition of a phrase or melody at a higher or lower pitch

‘a restless search for interesting harmonic sequences’;

Sequencenoun

the order in which amino-acid or nucleotide residues are arranged in a protein, DNA, etc.

‘these are enzymes which will cleave only at specific base sequences in the DNA’;

Sequencenoun

a set of related events, movements, or items that follow each other in a particular order

‘a gruelling sequence of exercises’; ‘a sonnet sequence’;

Sequencenoun

a set of three or more playing cards of the same suit next to each other in value, for example 10, 9, 8.

Sequencenoun

an infinite ordered series of numerical quantities.

Sequencenoun

a part of a film dealing with one particular event or topic

‘the famous underwater sequence’;

Sequencenoun

(in the Eucharist) a hymn said or sung after the Gradual or Alleluia that precedes the Gospel.

Sequenceverb

arrange in a particular order

‘trainee librarians decide how a set of misfiled cards could be sequenced’;

Sequenceverb

ascertain the sequence of amino-acid or nucleotide residues in (a protein, DNA, etc.)

‘independent clones were analysed by DNA sequencing’; ‘we have undertaken to isolate and sequence the rat retinoblastoma cDNA’;

Sequenceverb

play or record (music) with a sequencer.

Sequence

In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed and order matters. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms).

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