VS.

Sentience vs. Sentient

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Sentiencenoun

The state or quality of being sentient; possession of consciousness or sensory awareness.

Sentientadjective

Experiencing sensation, thought, or feeling.

Sentiencenoun

The quality or state of being sentient; esp., the quality or state of having sensation.

‘An example of harmonious action between the intelligence and the sentiency of the mind.’;

Sentientadjective

Able to consciously perceive through the use of sense faculties.

Sentiencenoun

state of elementary or undifferentiated consciousness;

‘the crash intruded on his awareness’;

Sentientadjective

Possessing human-like awareness and intelligence.

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Sentiencenoun

the faculty through which the external world is apprehended;

‘in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing’;

Sentientnoun

Lifeform with the capability to feel sensation, such as pain.

Sentiencenoun

the readiness to perceive sensations; elementary or undifferentiated consciousness;

‘gave sentience to slugs and newts’;

Sentientnoun

An intelligent, self-aware being.

Sentience

Sentience is the capacity to be aware of feelings and sensations. The word was first coined by philosophers in the 1630s for the concept of an ability to feel, derived from Latin sentientem (a feeling), to distinguish it from the ability to think (reason).

Sentientadjective

Having a faculty, or faculties, of sensation and perception.

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Sentientnoun

One who has the faculty of perception; a sentient being.

Sentientadjective

endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness;

‘the living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage’;

Sentientadjective

consciously perceiving;

‘sentient of the intolerable load’; ‘a boy so sentient of his surroundings’;

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