VS.

Scope vs. Subject

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Scopenoun

The breadth, depth or reach of a subject; a domain.

Subjectadjective

Likely to be affected by or to experience something.

‘a country subject to extreme heat’; ‘Menu listings and prices are subject to change.’; ‘He's subject to sneezing fits.’;

Scopenoun

(weapons) A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.

Subjectadjective

Conditional upon.

‘The local board sets local policy, subject to approval from the State Board.’;

Scopenoun

(computing) The region of program source in which an identifier is meaningful.

Subjectadjective

Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.

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Scopenoun

(logic) The shortest sub-wff of which a given instance of a logical connective is a part.

Subjectadjective

Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.

Scopenoun

(linguistics) The region of an utterance to which some modifying element applies.

‘the scope of an adverb’;

Subjectnoun

(grammar) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

‘In the sentence ‘The mouse is eaten by the cat in the kitchen.’, ‘The mouse’ is the subject, ‘the cat’ being the agent.’;

Scopenoun

(slang) A periscope, telescope, microscope or oscilloscope.

Subjectnoun

An actor; one who takes action.

‘The subjects and objects of power.’;

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Scopenoun

Short for any medical procedure that ends in the suffix endoscopy, colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, etc.}}

Subjectnoun

The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.

Scopeverb

To perform a cursory investigation, as to scope out.

Subjectnoun

A particular area of study.

‘Her favorite subject is physics.’;

Scopeverb

To perform any medical procedure that ends in the suffix -scopy, such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, etc.

‘The surgeon will scope the football player's knee to repair damage to a ligament.’;

Subjectnoun

A citizen in a monarchy.

‘I am a British subject.’;

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Scopeverb

(slang) To examine under a microscope.

‘The entomologist explained that he could not tell what species of springtail we were looking at without scoping it.’;

Subjectnoun

A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.

Scopenoun

That at which one aims; the thing or end to which the mind directs its view; that which is purposed to be reached or accomplished; hence, ultimate design, aim, or purpose; intention; drift; object.

‘Your scope is as mine own,So to enforce or qualify the lawsAs to your soul seems good.’; ‘The scope of all their pleading against man's authority, is to overthrow such laws and constitutions in the church.’;

Subjectnoun

(music) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.

Scopenoun

Room or opportunity for free outlook or aim; space for action; amplitude of opportunity; free course or vent; liberty; range of view, intent, or action.

‘Give him line and scope.’; ‘In the fate and fortunes of the human race, scope is given to the operation of laws which man must always fail to discern the reasons of.’; ‘Excuse me if I have given too much scope to the reflections which have arisen in my mind.’; ‘An intellectual cultivation of no moderate depth or scope.’;

Subjectnoun

A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.

Scopenoun

Extended area.

Subjectnoun

(philosophy) A being that has subjective experiences, subjective consciousness, or a relationship with another entity.

Scopenoun

Length; extent; sweep; as, scope of cable.

Subjectnoun

(logic) That of which something is stated.

Scopenoun

To look at for the purpose of evaluation; usually with out; as, to scope out the area as a camping site.

Subjectnoun

(math) The variable in terms of which an expression is defined.

‘0, we have x’;

Scopenoun

an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control:

‘the range of a supersonic jet’; ‘the ambit of municipal legislation’; ‘within the compass of this article’; ‘within the scope of an investigation’; ‘outside the reach of the law’; ‘in the political orbit of a world power’;

Subjectverb

To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

Scopenoun

the state of the environment in which a situation exists;

‘you can't do that in a university setting’;

Subjectadjective

Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.

Scopenoun

a magnifier of images of distant objects

Subjectadjective

Placed under the power of another; specifically (International Law), owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state; as, Jamaica is subject to Great Britain.

‘Esau was never subject to Jacob.’;

Scopenoun

electronic equipment that provides visual images of varying electrical quantities

Subjectadjective

Exposed; liable; prone; disposed; as, a country subject to extreme heat; men subject to temptation.

‘All human things are subject to decay.’;

Subjectadjective

Obedient; submissive.

‘Put them in mind to be subject to principalities.’;

Subjectnoun

That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else.

Subjectnoun

Specifically: One who is under the authority of a ruler and is governed by his laws; one who owes allegiance to a sovereign or a sovereign state; as, a subject of Queen Victoria; a British subject; a subject of the United States.

‘Was never subject longed to be a king,As I do long and wish to be a subject.’; ‘The subject must obey his prince, because God commands it, human laws require it.’;

Subjectnoun

That which is subjected, or submitted to, any physical operation or process; specifically (Anat.), a dead body used for the purpose of dissection.

Subjectnoun

That which is brought under thought or examination; that which is taken up for discussion, or concerning which anything is said or done.

‘Make choice of a subject, beautiful and noble, which . . . shall afford an ample field of matter wherein to expatiate.’; ‘The unhappy subject of these quarrels.’;

Subjectnoun

The person who is treated of; the hero of a piece; the chief character.

‘Writers of particular lives . . . are apt to be prejudiced in favor of their subject.’;

Subjectnoun

That of which anything is affirmed or predicated; the theme of a proposition or discourse; that which is spoken of; as, the nominative case is the subject of the verb.

‘The subject of a proposition is that concerning which anything is affirmed or denied.’;

Subjectnoun

That in which any quality, attribute, or relation, whether spiritual or material, inheres, or to which any of these appertain; substance; substratum.

‘That which manifests its qualities - in other words, that in which the appearing causes inhere, that to which they belong - is called their subject or substance, or substratum.’;

Subjectnoun

Hence, that substance or being which is conscious of its own operations; the mind; the thinking agent or principal; the ego. Cf. Object, n., 2.

‘The philosophers of mind have, in a manner, usurped and appropriated this expression to themselves. Accordingly, in their hands, the phrases conscious or thinking subject, and subject, mean precisely the same thing.’;

Subjectnoun

The principal theme, or leading thought or phrase, on which a composition or a movement is based.

‘The earliest known form of subject is the ecclesiastical cantus firmus, or plain song.’;

Subjectnoun

The incident, scene, figure, group, etc., which it is the aim of the artist to represent.

Subjectverb

To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue.

‘Firmness of mind that subjects every gratification of sense to the rule of right reason.’; ‘In one short view subjected to our eye,Gods, emperors, heroes, sages, beauties, lie.’; ‘He is the most subjected, the most nslaved, who is so in his understanding.’;

Subjectverb

To expose; to make obnoxious or liable; as, credulity subjects a person to impositions.

Subjectverb

To submit; to make accountable.

‘God is not bound to subject his ways of operation to the scrutiny of our thoughts.’;

Subjectverb

To make subservient.

‘Subjected to his service angel wings.’;

Subjectverb

To cause to undergo; as, to subject a substance to a white heat; to subject a person to a rigid test.

Subjectnoun

the subject matter of a conversation or discussion;

‘he didn't want to discuss that subject’; ‘it was a very sensitive topic’; ‘his letters were always on the theme of love’;

Subjectnoun

some situation or event that is thought about;

‘he kept drifting off the topic’; ‘he had been thinking about the subject for several years’; ‘it is a matter for the police’;

Subjectnoun

a branch of knowledge;

‘in what discipline is his doctorate?’; ‘teachers should be well trained in their subject’; ‘anthropology is the study of human beings’;

Subjectnoun

something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation;

‘a moving picture of a train is more dramatic than a still picture of the same subject’;

Subjectnoun

a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures; someone who is an object of investigation;

‘the subjects for this investigation were selected randomly’; ‘the cases that we studied were drawn from two different communities’;

Subjectnoun

a person who owes allegiance to that nation;

‘a monarch has a duty to his subjects’;

Subjectnoun

(grammar) one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the grammatical constituent about which something is predicated

Subjectnoun

(logic) the first term of a proposition

Subjectverb

cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to;

‘He subjected me to his awful poetry’; ‘The sergeant subjected the new recruits to many drills’; ‘People in Chernobyl were subjected to radiation’;

Subjectverb

make accountable for;

‘He did not want to subject himself to the judgments of his superiors’;

Subjectverb

make subservient; force to submit or subdue

Subjectverb

refer for judgment or consideration;

‘She submitted a proposal to the agency’;

Subjectadjective

not exempt from tax;

‘the gift will be subject to taxation’;

Subjectadjective

possibly accepting or permitting;

‘a passage capable of misinterpretation’; ‘open to interpretation’; ‘an issue open to question’; ‘the time is fixed by the director and players and therefore subject to much variation’;

Subjectadjective

being under the power or sovereignty of another or others;

‘subject peoples’; ‘a dependent prince’;

Subjectnoun

a person or thing that is being discussed, described, or dealt with

‘I've said all there is to be said on the subject’; ‘he's the subject of a major new biography’;

Subjectnoun

a person or circumstance giving rise to a specified feeling, response, or action

‘the incident was the subject of international condemnation’;

Subjectnoun

a person who is the focus of scientific or medical attention or experiment

‘subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire’;

Subjectnoun

the part of a proposition about which a statement is made.

Subjectnoun

a theme of a fugue or of a piece in sonata form; a leading phrase or motif

‘the chorale-like second subject of the Scherzo’;

Subjectnoun

a branch of knowledge studied or taught in a school, college, or university

‘maths is not my best subject’;

Subjectnoun

a member of a state other than its ruler, especially one owing allegiance to a monarch or other supreme ruler

‘the legislation is applicable only to British subjects’;

Subjectnoun

a noun or noun phrase functioning as one of the main components of a clause, being the element about which the rest of the clause is predicated.

Subjectnoun

a thinking or feeling entity; the conscious mind; the ego, especially as opposed to anything external to the mind.

Subjectnoun

the central substance or core of a thing as opposed to its attributes.

Subjectadjective

likely or prone to be affected by (a particular condition or occurrence, typically an unwelcome or unpleasant one)

‘he was subject to bouts of manic depression’;

Subjectadjective

dependent or conditional upon

‘the proposed merger is subject to the approval of the shareholders’;

Subjectadjective

under the authority of

‘ministers are subject to the laws of the land’;

Subjectadjective

under the control or domination of another ruler, country, or government

‘the Greeks were the first subject people to break free from Ottoman rule’;

Subjectadverb

conditionally upon

‘subject to the EC's agreement, we intend to set up an enterprise zone in the area’;

Subjectverb

cause or force someone or something to undergo (a particular experience or form of treatment, typically an unwelcome or unpleasant one)

‘he'd subjected her to a terrifying ordeal’;

Subjectverb

bring (a person or country) under one's control or jurisdiction, typically by using force

‘the city had been subjected to Macedonian rule’;

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