VS.

Saunter vs. Wander

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Saunterverb

To stroll, or walk at a leisurely pace.

Wanderverb

(intransitive) To move without purpose or specified destination; often in search of livelihood.

‘to wander over the fields’;

Saunternoun

A leisurely walk or stroll.

Wanderverb

(intransitive) To stray; stray from one's course; err.

‘A writer wanders from his subject.’;

Saunternoun

A leisurely pace.

Wanderverb

(intransitive) To commit adultery.

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Saunternoun

(obsolete) A place for sauntering or strolling.

Wanderverb

(intransitive) To go somewhere indirectly or at varying speeds; to move in a curved path.

Saunterverb

To wander or walk about idly and in a leisurely or lazy manner; to lounge; to stroll; to loiter.

‘One could lie under elm trees in a lawn, or saunter in meadows by the side of a stream.’;

Wanderverb

(intransitive) Of the mind, to lose focus or clarity of argument or attention.

Saunternoun

A sauntering, or a sauntering place.

‘That wheel of fops, that saunter of the town.’;

Wandernoun

The act or instance of wandering.

‘To go for a wander’;

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Saunternoun

a careless leisurely gait;

‘he walked with a kind of saunter as if he hadn't a care in the world’;

Wanderverb

To ramble here and there without any certain course or with no definite object in view; to range about; to stroll; to rove; as, to wander over the fields.

‘They wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins.’; ‘He wandereth abroad for bread.’;

Saunternoun

a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)

Wanderverb

To go away; to depart; to stray off; to deviate; to go astray; as, a writer wanders from his subject.

‘When God caused me to wander from my father's house.’; ‘O, let me not wander from thy commandments.’;

Saunterverb

walk leisurely and with no apparent aim

Wanderverb

To be delirious; not to be under the guidance of reason; to rave; as, the mind wanders.

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Wanderverb

To travel over without a certain course; to traverse; to stroll through.

Wanderverb

move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment;

‘The gypsies roamed the woods’; ‘roving vagabonds’; ‘the wandering Jew’; ‘The cattle roam across the prairie’; ‘the laborers drift from one town to the next’; ‘They rolled from town to town’;

Wanderverb

be sexually unfaithful to one's partner in marriage;

‘She cheats on her husband’; ‘Might her husband be wandering?’;

Wanderverb

go via an indirect route or at no set pace;

‘After dinner, we wandered into town’;

Wanderverb

to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course;

‘the river winds through the hills’; ‘the path meanders through the vineyards’; ‘sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body’;

Wanderverb

lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking;

‘She always digresses when telling a story’; ‘her mind wanders’; ‘Don't digress when you give a lecture’;

Wanderverb

walk or move in a leisurely or aimless way

‘I wandered through the narrow streets’;

Wanderverb

travel aimlessly through or over (an area)

‘he found her wandering the streets’;

Wanderverb

(of a road or river) meander

‘the narrow road wanders along the foreshore’;

Wanderverb

move slowly away from a fixed point or place

‘his attention had wandered’; ‘please don't wander off again’;

Wanderverb

be unfaithful to one's regular sexual partner

‘he had married her and he was not going to be allowed to wander’;

Wandernoun

an act or instance of wandering

‘she'd go on wanders like that in her nightgown’;

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