VS.

Sail vs. Sink

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Sailnoun

(nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.

Sinkverb

To move or be moved into something.

Sailnoun

(nautical,uncountable) The concept of a sail or sails, as if a substance.

‘Take in sail, a storm is coming.’;

Sinkverb

(ergative) To descend or submerge (or to cause to do so) into a liquid or similar substance.

‘A stone sinks in water.’; ‘The sun gradually sank in the west.’;

Sailnoun

(uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use this power for travel or transport.

Sinkverb

(transitive) To cause a vessel to sink, generally by making it no longer watertight.

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Sailnoun

A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.

‘Let's go for a sail.’;

Sinkverb

(transitive) To push (something) into something.

‘The joint will hold tighter if you sink a wood screw through both boards.’; ‘The dog sank its teeth into the delivery man's leg.’;

Sailnoun

(dated) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Plural sail.

‘Twenty sail were in sight.’;

Sinkverb

To pot; hit a ball into a pocket or hole.

Sailnoun

The blade of a windmill.

Sinkverb

To diminish or be diminished.

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Sailnoun

A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.

Sinkverb

To experience apprehension, disappointment, dread, or momentary depression.

Sailnoun

The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.

Sinkverb

To cause to decline; to depress or degrade.

‘to sink one's reputation’;

Sailnoun

(fishing) A sailfish.

‘We caught three sails today.’;

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To demean or lower oneself; to do something below one's status, standards, or morals.

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Sailnoun

(paleontology) an outward projection of the spine, occurring in certain dinosaurs and synapsids

Sinkverb

To conceal and appropriate.

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.

Sinkverb

To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.

Sinkverb

To reduce or extinguish by payment.

‘to sink the national debt’;

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fail in strength.

Sailverb

To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.

Sinkverb

(intransitive) To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

‘We sail for Australia tomorrow.’;

Sinknoun

A basin used for holding water for washing

Sailverb

To move briskly and gracefully through the air.

Sinknoun

A drain for carrying off wastewater

Sailverb

To move briskly.

‘The duchess sailed haughtily out of the room.’;

Sinknoun

(geology) A sinkhole

Sailnoun

An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.

‘Behoves him now both sail and oar.’;

Sinknoun

A depression in land where water collects, with no visible outlet

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.

Sinknoun

A heat sink

Sailnoun

A wing; a van.

‘Like an eagle soaringTo weather his broad sails.’;

Sinknoun

A place that absorbs resources or energy

Sailnoun

The extended surface of the arm of a windmill.

Sinknoun

(baseball) The motion of a sinker pitch

‘Jones' has a two-seamer with heavy sink.’;

Sailnoun

A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.

Sinknoun

An object or callback that captures events; event sink

Sailnoun

A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water.

Sinknoun

(graph theory) a destination vertex in a transportation network

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power.

Sinkverb

To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

‘I sink in deep mire.’;

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl.

Sinkverb

To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.

‘The stone sunk into his forehead.’;

Sailverb

To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton.

Sinkverb

Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.

‘Let these sayings sink down into your ears.’;

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

Sinkverb

To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.

‘I think our country sinks beneath the yoke.’; ‘He sunk down in his chariot.’; ‘Let not the fire sink or slacken.’;

Sailverb

To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird.

‘As is a winged messenger of heaven, . . .When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds,And sails upon the bosom of the air.’;

Sinkverb

To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

‘The Alps and Pyreneans sink before him.’;

Sailverb

To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force.

‘A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea.’;

Sinkverb

To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.

‘[The Athenians] fell upon the wings and sank a single ship.’;

Sailverb

To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.

‘Sublime she sailsThe aërial space, and mounts the wingèd gales.’;

Sinkverb

Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.

‘I raise of sink, imprison or set free.’; ‘If I have a conscience, let it sink me.’; ‘Thy cruel and unnatural lust of powerHas sunk thy father more than all his years.’;

Sailverb

To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship.

Sinkverb

To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die.

Sailnoun

a large piece of fabric (as canvas) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel

Sinkverb

To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.

‘You sunk the river repeated draughts.’;

Sailnoun

an ocean trip taken for pleasure

Sinkverb

To conseal and appropriate.

‘If sent with ready money to buy anything, and you happen to be out of pocket, sink the money, and take up the goods on account.’;

Sailverb

traverse or travel by ship on (a body of water);

‘We sailed the Atlantic’; ‘He sailed the Pacific all alone’;

Sinkverb

To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

‘A courtly willingness to sink obnoxious truths.’;

Sailverb

move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions;

‘The diva swept into the room’; ‘Shreds of paper sailed through the air’; ‘The searchlights swept across the sky’;

Sinkverb

To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.

Sailverb

travel in a boat propelled by wind;

‘I love sailing, especially on the open sea’;

Sinknoun

A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.

Sailverb

travel by boat on a boat propelled by wind or by other means;

‘The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow’;

Sinknoun

A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen.

Sailnoun

a piece of material extended on a mast to catch the wind and propel a boat or ship or other vessel

‘all the sails were unfurled’; ‘the boat can no longer carry that area of sail’;

Sinknoun

A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole.

Sailnoun

the use of sailing ships as a means of transport

‘this led to bigger ships as steam replaced sail’;

Sinknoun

The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River.

Sailnoun

a sailing ship

‘sail ahoy!’;

Sinknoun

plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe

Sailnoun

a wind-catching apparatus attached to the arm of a windmill.

Sinknoun

(technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system;

‘the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide’;

Sailnoun

the broad fin on the back of a sailfish or of some prehistoric reptiles.

Sinknoun

a depression in the ground communicating with a subterranean passage (especially in limestone) and formed by solution or by collapse of a cavern roof

Sailnoun

a structure by which an animal is propelled across the surface of water by the wind, e.g. the float of a Portuguese man-of-war.

Sinknoun

a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it

Sailnoun

a voyage or excursion in a ship, especially a sailing ship or boat

‘they went for a sail’;

Sinkverb

fall or drop to a lower place or level;

‘He sank to his knees’;

Sailnoun

the conning tower of a submarine.

Sinkverb

cause to sink;

‘The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor’;

Sailnoun

a canvas sheet or tarpaulin

‘the sail covering the load of crates broke loose from the truck’;

Sinkverb

pass into a specified state or condition;

‘He sank into Nirvana’;

Sailverb

travel in a boat with sails, especially as a sport or recreation

‘Ian took us out sailing on the lake’;

Sinkverb

go under,

‘The raft sank and its occupants drowned’;

Sailverb

travel in a ship or boat using sails or engine power

‘the ferry caught fire sailing between Caen and Portsmouth’;

Sinkverb

descend into or as if into some soft substance or place;

‘He sank into bed’; ‘She subsided into the chair’;

Sailverb

begin a voyage; leave a harbour

‘the catamaran sails at 3:30’;

Sinkverb

appear to move downward;

‘The sun dipped below the horizon’; ‘The setting sun sank below the tree line’;

Sailverb

travel by ship on or across (a sea) or on (a route)

‘plastic ships could be sailing the oceans soon’;

Sinkverb

fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly;

‘The real estate market fell off’;

Sailverb

navigate or control (a boat or ship)

‘I stole a small fishing boat and sailed it to the Delta’;

Sinkverb

fall or sink heavily;

‘He slumped onto the couch’; ‘My spirits sank’;

Sailverb

move smoothly and rapidly or in a stately or confident manner

‘the ball sailed inside the right-hand post’;

Sinkverb

embed deeply;

‘She sank her fingers into the soft sand’; ‘He buried his head in her lap’;

Sailverb

succeed easily at (something, especially a test or examination)

‘Ali sailed through his exams’;

Sinkverb

go down below the surface of something, especially of a liquid; become submerged

‘he saw the coffin sink below the surface of the waves’;

Sailverb

attack physically or verbally with force.

Sinkverb

(of a ship) go to the bottom of the sea or some other body of water because of damage or a collision

‘the trawler sank with the loss of all six crew’;

Sail

A sail is a tensile structure—made from fabric or other membrane materials—that uses wind power to propel sailing craft, including sailing ships, sailboats, windsurfers, ice boats, and even sail-powered land vehicles. Sails may be made from a combination of woven materials—including canvas or polyester cloth, laminated membranes or bonded filaments—usually in a three- or four-sided shape.

Sinkverb

cause (a ship) to sink

‘a freak wave sank their boat near the shore’;

Sinkverb

fail and not be seen or heard of again

‘the film sank virtually without trace’;

Sinkverb

cause to fail

‘this pledge could sink the government’;

Sinkverb

conceal, keep in the background, or ignore

‘they agreed to sink their differences’;

Sinkverb

descend from a higher to a lower position; drop downwards

‘you can relax on the veranda as the sun sinks low’;

Sinkverb

(of a person) lower oneself or drop down gently

‘she sank back on to her pillow’;

Sinkverb

gradually penetrate into the surface of something

‘her feet sank into the thick pile of the carpet’;

Sinkverb

gradually decrease or decline in value, amount, quality, or intensity

‘their output sank to a third of the pre-war figure’;

Sinkverb

lapse or fall into a particular state or condition

‘he sank into a coma after suffering a brain haemorrhage’;

Sinkverb

approach death

‘the doctor concluded that the lad was sinking fast’;

Sinkverb

insert beneath a surface

‘rails fixed in place with screws sunk below the surface of the wood’;

Sinkverb

cause something sharp to penetrate (a surface)

‘the dog sank its teeth into her arm’;

Sinkverb

push or thrust (an object) into something

‘Kelly stood watching, her hands sunk deep into her pockets’;

Sinkverb

excavate (a well) or bore (a shaft) vertically downwards

‘they planned to sink a gold mine in Oklahoma’;

Sinkverb

hit (a ball) into a hole in golf or snooker

‘he sank the black into the green pocket to secure victory’;

Sinkverb

(in golf) hit the ball into the hole with (a putt or other shot)

‘he sank a four-foot birdie putt at the fifth hole’;

Sinkverb

rapidly consume (an alcoholic drink)

‘English players sinking a few post-match lagers’;

Sinknoun

a fixed basin with a water supply and outflow pipe

‘a sink unit with cupboard and drawers under’; ‘I stood at the kitchen sink’;

Sinknoun

a pool or marsh in which a river's water disappears by evaporation or percolation.

Sinknoun

a body or process which acts to absorb or remove energy or a particular component from a system

‘a heat sink’; ‘the oceans can act as a sink for CO₂’;

Sinknoun

short for sinkhole

Sinknoun

a place of vice or corruption

‘a sink of unnatural vice, pride, and luxury’;

Sinknoun

a school or estate situated in a socially deprived area

‘the local sink school’; ‘a sink estate’;

Sink

A sink – also known by other names including sinker, washbowl, hand basin, wash basin, and simply basin – is a bowl-shaped plumbing fixture used for washing hands, dishwashing, and other purposes. Sinks have taps (faucets) that supply hot and cold water and may include a spray feature to be used for faster rinsing.

Sail Illustrations

Sink Illustrations

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