VS.

Rumor vs. Rumour

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Rumornoun

A statement or claim of questionable accuracy, from no known reliable source, usually spread by word of mouth.

‘There's a rumor going round that he's going to get married.’;

Rumournoun

alternative spelling of rumor|from=British|from2=Canadian|from3=New Zealand|from4=Australia|from5=Ireland

Rumornoun

Information or misinformation of the kind contained in such claims.

‘They say he used to be a thief, but that's just rumor.’;

Rumournoun

(obsolete) A prolonged, indistinct noise.

Rumorverb

To tell a rumor about; to gossip.

‘John is rumored to be next in line for a promotion.’;

Rumourverb

standard spelling of rumor

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Rumornoun

A flying or popular report; the common talk; hence, public fame; notoriety.

‘This rumor of him went forth throughout all Judea, and throughout all the region round about.’; ‘Great is the rumor of this dreadful knight.’;

Rumournoun

gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth

Rumornoun

A current story passing from one person to another, without any known authority for its truth; - in this sense often personified.

‘Rumor next, and Chance,And Tumult, and Confusion, all embroiled.’;

Rumourverb

tell or spread rumors;

‘It was rumored that the next president would be a woman’;

Rumornoun

A prolonged, indistinct noise.

Rumournoun

a currently circulating story or report of uncertain or doubtful truth

‘rumour has it that he will take a year off’; ‘they were investigating rumours of a massacre’;

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Rumorverb

To report by rumor; to tell.

‘'T was rumoredMy father 'scaped from out the citadel.’;

Rumourverb

be circulated as an unverified account

‘she is rumoured to have gone into hiding’; ‘it's rumoured that he lives on a houseboat’;

Rumornoun

gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth

Rumorverb

tell or spread rumors;

‘It was rumored that the next president would be a woman’;

Rumor

A rumour (British English), or rumor (American English; see spelling differences; derived from Latin: 'rumorem' - noise), is In the social sciences, a rumour involves a form of a statement whose veracity is not quickly or ever confirmed. In addition, some scholars have identified rumour as a subset of propaganda.

‘a tall tale of explanations of events circulating from person to person and pertaining to an object, event, or issue in public concern.’;

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