VS.

Rumex vs. Dock

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Rumexnoun

(botany) Any plant of the genus Rumex; a dock or sorrel.

Docknoun

Any of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with small green flowers related to buckwheat, especially common dock, and used as potherbs and in folk medicine, especially in curing nettle rash.

Rumex

The docks and sorrels, genus Rumex, are a genus of about 200 species of annual, biennial, and perennial herbs in the buckwheat family, Polygonaceae. Members of this genus are very common perennial herbs with a native almost worldwide distribution, and introduced species growing in the few places where the genus is not native.Some are nuisance weeds (and are sometimes called dockweed or dock weed), but some are grown for their edible leaves.

Docknoun

A burdock plant, or the leaves of that plant.

Docknoun

The fleshy root of an animal's tail.

Docknoun

The part of the tail which remains after the tail has been docked.

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Docknoun

(obsolete) The buttocks or anus.

Docknoun

A leather case to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.

Docknoun

A fixed structure attached to shore to which a vessel is secured when in port.

Docknoun

The body of water between two piers.

Docknoun

A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.

Docknoun

A section of a hotel or restaurant.

‘coffee dock’;

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Docknoun

(electronics) A device designed as a base for holding a connected portable appliance such as a laptop computer (in this case, referred to as a docking station), or a mobile telephone, for providing the necessary electrical charge for its autonomy, or as a hardware extension for additional capabilities.

Docknoun

A toolbar that provides the user with a way of launching applications, and switching between running applications.

Docknoun

An act of docking; joining two things together.

Docknoun

Part of a courtroom where the accused sits.

Dockverb

(transitive) To cut off a section of an animal's tail, to practise a caudectomy.

Dockverb

(transitive) To reduce (wages); to deduct from.

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Dockverb

(transitive) To cut off, bar, or destroy.

‘to dock an entail’;

Dockverb

(intransitive) To land at a harbour.

Dockverb

To join two moving items.

Dockverb

To drag a user interface element (such as a toolbar) to a position on screen where it snaps into place.

Docknoun

A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination.

Docknoun

The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting.

Docknoun

A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.

Docknoun

An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, - used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide.

Docknoun

The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; - sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock.

Docknoun

The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.

Dockverb

to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.

‘His top was docked like a priest biforn.’;

Dockverb

To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages.

Dockverb

To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail.

Dockverb

To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc.

Docknoun

an enclosure in a court of law where the defendant sits during the trial

Docknoun

any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicine

Docknoun

a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats

Docknoun

a platform where trucks or trains can be loaded or unloaded

Docknoun

landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out;

‘the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late’;

Docknoun

the solid bony part of the tail of an animal as distinguished from the hair

Docknoun

a short or shortened tail of certain animals

Dockverb

come into dock;

‘the ship docked’;

Dockverb

deprive someone of benefits, as a penalty

Dockverb

deduct from someone's wages

Dockverb

remove or shorten the tail of an animal

Dockverb

haul into a dock;

‘dock the ships’;

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