VS.

Rumble vs. Storm

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Rumblenoun

A low, heavy, continuous sound, such as that of thunder or a hungry stomach.

‘The rumble from passing trucks made it hard to sleep at night.’;

Stormnoun

Any disturbed state of the atmosphere, especially as affecting the earth's surface, and strongly implying destructive or unpleasant weather.

Rumblenoun

(slang) A street fight or brawl.

Stormnoun

A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; violent outbreak.

‘The proposed reforms have led to a political storm.’;

Rumblenoun

A rotating cask or box in which small articles are smoothed or polished by friction against each other.

Stormnoun

(meteorology) a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane (10 or higher on the Beaufort scale).

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Rumblenoun

(dated) A seat for servants, behind the body of a carriage.

Stormnoun

(military) A violent assault on a stronghold or fortified position.

Rumbleverb

(intransitive) To make a low, heavy, continuous sound.

‘If I don't eat, my stomach will rumble.’; ‘I could hear the thunder rumbling in the distance.’;

Stormverb

To move quickly and noisily like a storm, usually in a state of uproar or anger.

‘She stormed out of the room.’;

Rumbleverb

(transitive) To discover deceitful or underhanded behaviour.

‘The police is going to rumble your hideout.’;

Stormverb

(intransitive) To rage or fume; to be in a violent temper.

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Rumbleverb

(intransitive) To move while making a rumbling noise.

‘The truck rumbled over the rough road.’;

Stormverb

(transitive) To assault (a stronghold or fortification) with military forces.

‘Troops stormed the complex.’;

Rumbleverb

To fight; to brawl.

Stormverb

(impersonal) To have the weather be violent, with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow.

‘It stormed throughout the night.’;

Rumbleverb

to provide haptic feedback by vibrating.

Stormnoun

A violent disturbance of the atmosphere, attended by wind, rain, snow, hail, or thunder and lightning; hence, often, a heavy fall of rain, snow, or hail, whether accompanied with wind or not.

‘We hear this fearful tempest sing,Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm.’;

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Rumbleverb

(transitive) To cause to pass through a rumble, or polishing machine.

Stormnoun

A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; sedition, insurrection, or war; violent outbreak; clamor; tumult.

‘I will stir up in England some black storm.’; ‘Her sisterBegan to scold and raise up such a storm.’;

Rumbleverb

(obsolete) To murmur; to ripple.

Stormnoun

A heavy shower or fall, any adverse outburst of tumultuous force; violence.

‘A brave man struggling in the storms of fate.’;

Rumbleinterjection

An onomatopoeia describing a rumbling noise

Stormnoun

A violent assault on a fortified place; a furious attempt of troops to enter and take a fortified place by scaling the walls, forcing the gates, or the like.

‘Storms beat, and rolls the main;O! beat those storms, and roll the seas, in vain.’; ‘What at first was called a gust, the sameHath now a storm's, anon a tempest's name.’;

Rumbleverb

To make a low, heavy, continued sound; as, the thunder rumbles at a distance.

‘In the mean while the skies 'gan rumble sore.’; ‘The people cried and rombled up and down.’;

Stormverb

To assault; to attack, and attempt to take, by scaling walls, forcing gates, breaches, or the like; as, to storm a fortified town.

Rumbleverb

To murmur; to ripple.

‘To rumble gently down with murmur soft.’;

Stormverb

To raise a tempest.

Rumbleverb

To cause to pass through a rumble, or shaking machine. See Rumble, n., 4.

Stormverb

To blow with violence; also, to rain, hail, snow, or the like, usually in a violent manner, or with high wind; - used impersonally; as, it storms.

Rumblenoun

A noisy report; rumor.

‘Delighting ever in rumble that is new.’;

Stormverb

To rage; to be in a violent passion; to fume.

‘The master storms, the lady scolds.’;

Rumblenoun

A low, heavy, continuous sound like that made by heavy wagons or the reverberation of thunder; a confused noise; as, the rumble of a railroad train.

‘Clamor and rumble, and ringing and clatter.’; ‘Merged in the rumble of awakening day.’;

Stormnoun

a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightening

Rumblenoun

A seat for servants, behind the body of a carriage.

‘Kit, well wrapped, . . . was in the rumble behind.’;

Stormnoun

a violent commotion or disturbance;

‘the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away’; ‘it was only a tempest in a teapot’;

Rumblenoun

A rotating cask or box in which small articles are smoothed or polished by friction against each other.

Stormnoun

a direct and violent assault on a stronghold

Rumblenoun

a loud low dull continuous noise;

‘they heard the rumbling of thunder’;

Stormverb

behave violently, as if in state of a great anger

Rumblenoun

a servant's seat (or luggage compartment) in the rear of a carriage

Stormverb

take by force;

‘Storm the fort’;

Rumblenoun

a fight between rival gangs of adolescents

Stormverb

rain, hail, or snow hard and be very windy, often with thunder or lightning;

‘If it storms, we'll need shelter’;

Rumbleverb

make a low noise;

‘rumbling thunder’;

Stormverb

blow hard;

‘It was storming all night’;

Rumbleverb

to utter or emit low dull rumbling sounds;

‘he grumbled a rude response’; ‘Stones grumbled down the cliff’;

Stormverb

attack by storm; attack suddenly

Storm

A storm is any disturbed state of an environment or in an astronomical body's atmosphere especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. It may be marked by significant disruptions to normal conditions such as strong wind, tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning (a thunderstorm), heavy precipitation (snowstorm, rainstorm), heavy freezing rain (ice storm), strong winds (tropical cyclone, windstorm), or wind transporting some substance through the atmosphere as in a dust storm, blizzard, sandstorm, etc.

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