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Ridicule vs. Scorn — What's the Difference?

Ridicule vs. Scorn — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Ridicule and Scorn

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Ridicule

The act of using words, gestures, images, or other products of expression to evoke laughter or contemptuous feelings regarding a person or thing
A remark that invited the ridicule of his classmates.

Scorn

A feeling and expression of contempt or disdain for someone or something
I do not wish to become the object of scorn

Ridicule

The words or other products of expression used in this way
Was subjected to a torrent of ridicule.

Scorn

Feel or express contempt or disdain for
The minister scorned Labour's attempt to woo voters

Ridicule

To expose to ridicule; make fun of.
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Scorn

Contempt or disdain felt toward a person or object considered despicable or unworthy
Viewed his rivals with scorn.

Ridicule

(transitive) to criticize or disapprove of someone or something through scornful jocularity; to make fun of
His older sibling constantly ridiculed him with sarcastic remarks.

Scorn

The expression of such an attitude in behavior or speech; derision
Heaped scorn upon his rivals.

Ridicule

Derision; mocking or humiliating words or behaviour

Scorn

The state of being despised or dishonored
Held in scorn by his rivals.

Ridicule

An object of sport or laughter; a laughing stock.

Scorn

(Archaic) One spoken of or treated with contempt.

Ridicule

The quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.

Scorn

To consider or treat as contemptible or unworthy
An artist who was scorned by conservative critics.

Ridicule

A small woman's handbag; a reticule.

Scorn

To reject or refuse with derision
Scorned their offer of help.

Ridicule

(obsolete) ridiculous

Scorn

To consider or reject (doing something) as beneath one's dignity
"She disapproved so heartily of Flora's plan that she would have scorned to assist in the concoction of a single oily sentence" (Stella Gibbons).

Ridicule

An object of sport or laughter; a laughingstock; a laughing matter.
[Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that his deficiencies made him the ridicule of his contemporaries.
To the people . . . but a trifle, to the king but a ridicule.

Scorn

(transitive) To feel or display contempt or disdain for something or somebody; to despise.

Ridicule

Remarks concerning a subject or a person designed to excite laughter with a degree of contempt; wit of that species which provokes contemptuous laughter; disparagement by making a person an object of laughter; banter; - a term lighter than derision.
We have in great measure restricted the meaning of ridicule, which would properly extend over whole region of the ridiculous, - the laughable, - and we have narrowed it so that in common usage it mostly corresponds to "derision", which does indeed involve personal and offensive feelings.
Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne,Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone.

Scorn

(transitive) To reject, turn down.
He scorned her romantic advances.

Ridicule

Quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.
To see the ridicule of this practice.

Scorn

(transitive) To refuse to do something, as beneath oneself.
She scorned to show weakness.

Ridicule

To laugh at mockingly or disparagingly; to awaken ridicule toward or respecting.
I 've known the young, who ridiculed his rage.

Scorn

(intransitive) To scoff, to express contempt.

Ridicule

Ridiculous.
This action . . . became so ridicule.

Scorn

(uncountable) Contempt or disdain.

Ridicule

Language or behavior intended to mock or humiliate

Scorn

(countable) A display of disdain; a slight.

Ridicule

The act of deriding or treating with contempt

Scorn

(countable) An object of disdain, contempt, or derision.

Ridicule

Subject to laughter or ridicule;
The satirists ridiculed the plans for a new opera house
The students poked fun at the inexperienced teacher
His former students roasted the professor at his 60th birthday

Scorn

Extreme and lofty contempt; haughty disregard; that disdain which springs from the opinion of the utter meanness and unworthiness of an object.
Scorn at first makes after love the more.
And wandered backward as in scorn,To wait an æon to be born.

Scorn

An act or expression of extreme contempt.
Every sullen frown and bitter scornBut fanned the fuel that too fast did burn.

Scorn

An object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision.
Thou makest us a reproach to our neighbors, a scorn and a derision to them that are round about us.

Scorn

To hold in extreme contempt; to reject as unworthy of regard; to despise; to contemn; to disdain.
I scorn thy meat; 't would choke me.
This my long sufferance, and my day of grace,Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste.
We scorn what is in itself contemptible or disgraceful.

Scorn

To treat with extreme contempt; to make the object of insult; to mock; to scoff at; to deride.
His fellow, that lay by his bed's side,Gan for to laugh, and scorned him full fast.
To taunt and scorn you thus opprobriously.

Scorn

To scoff; to mock; to show contumely, derision, or reproach; to act disdainfully.
He said mine eyes were black and my hair black,And, now I am remembered, scorned at me.

Scorn

Lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike;
He was held in contempt
The despite in which outsiders were held is legendary

Scorn

Open disrespect for a person or thing

Scorn

Look down on with disdain;
He despises the people he has to work for
The professor scorns the students who don't catch on immediately

Scorn

Reject with contempt;
She spurned his advances

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