VS.

Ride vs. Synonym

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Rideverb

To transport oneself by sitting on and directing a horse, later also a bicycle etc.

Synonymnoun

A word whose meaning is the same as that of another word.

Rideverb

To be transported in a vehicle; to travel as a passenger.

Synonymnoun

A word or phrase with a meaning that is the same as, or very similar to, another word or phrase.

‘“Happy” is a synonym of “glad”.’;

Rideverb

To transport (someone) in a vehicle.

‘The cab rode him downtown.’;

Synonymnoun

(zoology) Any of the formal names for a taxon, including the valid name (i.e. the senior synonym).

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Rideverb

(intransitive) Of a ship: to sail, to float on the water.

Synonymnoun

Any name for a taxon, usually a validly published, formally accepted one, but often also an unpublished name.

Rideverb

To be carried or supported by something lightly and quickly; to travel in such a way, as though on horseback.

‘The witch cackled and rode away on her broomstick.’;

Synonymnoun

(databases) An alternative (often shorter) name defined for an object in a database.

Rideverb

(intransitive) To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle.

‘A horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast.’;

Synonymnoun

One of two or more words (commonly words of the same language) which are equivalents of each other; one of two or more words which have very nearly the same signification, and therefore may often be used interchangeably. See under Synonymous.

‘All languages tend to clear themselves of synonyms as intellectual culture advances, the superfluous words being taken up and appropriated by new shades and combinations of thought evolved in the progress of society.’; ‘His name has thus become, throughout all civilized countries, a synonym for probity and philanthropy.’; ‘In popular literary acceptation, and as employed in special dictionaries of such words, synonyms are words sufficiently alike in general signification to be liable to be confounded, but yet so different in special definition as to require to be distinguished.’;

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Rideverb

To mount (someone) to have sex with them; to have sexual intercourse with.

Synonymnoun

An incorrect or incorrectly applied scientific name, as a new name applied to a species or genus already properly named, or a specific name preoccupied by that of another species of the same genus; - so used in the system of nomenclature (which see) in which the correct scientific names of certain natural groups (usually genera, species, and subspecies) are regarded as determined by priority.

Rideverb

To nag or criticize; to annoy (someone).

Synonymnoun

One of two or more words corresponding in meaning but of different languages; a heteronym.

Rideverb

(intransitive) Of clothing: to gradually move (up) and crease; to ruckle.

Synonymnoun

two words that can be interchanged in a context are said to be synonymous relative to that context

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Rideverb

(intransitive) To rely, depend (on).

Synonymnoun

a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language, for example shut is a synonym of close

‘‘the East’ was a synonym for the Soviet empire’; ‘‘shut’ is a synonym of ‘close’’;

Rideverb

(intransitive) Of clothing: to rest (in a given way on a part of the body).

Synonymnoun

a person or thing so closely associated with a particular quality or idea that the mention of their name calls it to mind

‘the Victorian age is a synonym for sexual puritanism’;

Rideverb

(lacrosse) To play defense on the defensemen or midfielders, as an attackman.

Synonymnoun

a taxonomic name which has the same application as another, especially one which has been superseded and is no longer valid.

Rideverb

To manage insolently at will; to domineer over.

Synonym

A synonym is a word, morpheme, or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word, morpheme, or phrase in the same language. For example, the words begin, start, commence, and initiate are all synonyms of one another; they are synonymous.

Rideverb

To convey, as by riding; to make or do by riding.

Rideverb

(surgery) To overlap (each other); said of bones or fractured fragments.

Ridenoun

An instance of riding.

‘Can I have a ride on your bike?’; ‘We took the horses for an early-morning ride in the woods.’;

Ridenoun

(informal) A vehicle.

‘That's a nice ride; what did it cost?’;

Ridenoun

An amusement ridden at a fair or amusement park.

Ridenoun

A lift given to someone in another person's vehicle.

‘Can you give me a ride?’;

Ridenoun

(UK) A road or avenue cut in a wood, for riding; a bridleway or other wide country path.

Ridenoun

A saddle horse.

Ridenoun

(Ireland) A person (or sometimes a thing or a place) that is visually attractive.

Rideverb

To be carried on the back of an animal, as a horse.

‘To-morrow, when ye riden by the way.’; ‘Let your master ride on before, and do you gallop after him.’;

Rideverb

To be borne in a carriage; as, to ride in a coach, in a car, and the like. See Synonym, below.

‘The richest inhabitants exhibited their wealth, not by riding in gilden carriages, but by walking the streets with trains of servants.’;

Rideverb

To be borne or in a fluid; to float; to lie.

‘Men once walked where ships at anchor ride.’;

Rideverb

To be supported in motion; to rest.

‘Strong as the exletreeOn which heaven rides.’; ‘On whose foolish honestyMy practices ride easy!’;

Rideverb

To manage a horse, as an equestrian.

‘He rode, he fenced, he moved with graceful ease.’;

Rideverb

To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle; as, a horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast.

‘"Will you ride over or drive?" said Lord Willowby to his quest, after breakfast that morning.’;

Rideverb

To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse; to ride a bicycle.

‘[They] rend up both rocks and hills, and ride the airIn whirlwind.’;

Rideverb

To manage insolently at will; to domineer over.

‘The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers, and brewers.’;

Rideverb

To convey, as by riding; to make or do by riding.

‘Tue only men that safe can rideMine errands on the Scottish side.’;

Rideverb

To overlap (each other); - said of bones or fractured fragments.

Ridenoun

The act of riding; an excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.

Ridenoun

A saddle horse.

Ridenoun

A road or avenue cut in a wood, or through grounds, to be used as a place for riding; a riding.

Ridenoun

a journey in a vehicle driven by someone else;

‘he took the family for a drive in his new car’;

Ridenoun

a mechanical device that you ride for amusement or excitement

Rideverb

sit and travel on the back of animal, usually while controlling its motions;

‘She never sat a horse!’; ‘Did you ever ride a camel?’; ‘The girl liked to drive the young mare’;

Rideverb

be carried or travel on or in a vehicle;

‘I ride to work in a bus’; ‘He rides the subway downtown every day’;

Rideverb

continue undisturbed and without interference;

‘Let it ride’;

Rideverb

move like a floating object;

‘The moon rode high in the night sky’;

Rideverb

harass with persistent criticism or carping;

‘The children teased the new teacher’; ‘Don't ride me so hard over my failure’; ‘His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie’;

Rideverb

be sustained or supported or borne;

‘His glasses rode high on his nose’; ‘The child rode on his mother's hips’; ‘She rode a wave of popularity’; ‘The brothers rode to an easy victory on their father's political name’;

Rideverb

have certain properties when driven;

‘This car rides smoothly’; ‘My new truck drives well’;

Rideverb

be contingent on;

‘The outcomes rides on the results of the electin’; ‘Your grade will depends on your homework’;

Rideverb

lie moored or anchored;

‘Ship rides at anchor’;

Rideverb

sit on and control a vehicle;

‘He rides his bicycle to work every day’; ‘She loves to ride her new motorcycle through town’;

Rideverb

climb up on the body;

‘Shorts that ride up’; ‘This skirt keeps riding up my legs’;

Rideverb

ride over, along, or through;

‘Travel the highways of America’; ‘Ride the freeways of California’;

Rideverb

keep partially engaged by slightly depressing a pedal with the foot;

‘Don't ride the clutch!’;

Rideverb

copulate with;

‘The bull was riding the cow’;

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