VS.

Retain vs. Sustain

Published:
Views: 144

Retainverb

(transitive) To keep in possession or use.

Sustainverb

(transitive) To maintain, or keep in existence.

‘The professor had trouble sustaining students’ interest until the end of her lectures.’; ‘The city came under sustained attack by enemy forces.’;

Retainverb

(transitive) To keep in one's pay or service.

Sustainverb

(transitive) To provide for or nourish.

‘provisions to sustain an army’;

Retainverb

(transitive) To employ by paying a retainer.

Sustainverb

(transitive) To encourage (something). en

ADVERTISEMENT

Retainverb

(transitive) To hold secure.

Sustainverb

(transitive) To experience or suffer (an injury, etc.).

‘The building sustained major damage in the earthquake.’;

Retainverb

(obsolete) To restrain; to prevent.

Sustainverb

(transitive) To confirm, prove, or corroborate; to uphold.

‘to sustain a charge, an accusation, or a proposition’;

Retainverb

(obsolete) To belong; to pertain.

Sustainverb

To keep from falling; to bear; to uphold; to support.

‘A foundation sustains the superstructure; an animal sustains a load; a rope sustains a weight.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Retainverb

To continue to hold; to keep in possession; not to lose, part with, or dismiss; to restrain from departure, escape, or the like.

‘Be obedient, and retainUnalterably firm his love entire.’; ‘An executor may retain a debt due to him from the testator.’;

Sustainverb

To aid, comfort, or relieve; to vindicate.

Retainverb

To keep in pay; to employ by a preliminary fee paid; to hire; to engage; as, to retain a counselor.

‘A Benedictine convent has now retained the most learned father of their order to write in its defense.’;

Sustainnoun

(music) A mechanism which can be used to hold a note, as the right pedal on a piano.

Retainverb

To restrain; to prevent.

Sustainverb

To keep from falling; to bear; to uphold; to support; as, a foundation sustains the superstructure; a beast sustains a load; a rope sustains a weight.

‘Every pillar the temple to sustain.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Retainverb

To belong; to pertain.

‘A somewhat languid relish, retaining to bitterness.’;

Sustainverb

Hence, to keep from sinking, as in despondence, or the like; to support.

‘No comfortable expectations of another life to sustain him under the evils in this world.’;

Retainverb

To keep; to continue; to remain.

Sustainverb

To maintain; to keep alive; to support; to subsist; to nourish; as, provisions to sustain an army.

Retainverb

hold within;

‘This soil retains water’; ‘I retain this drug for a long time’;

Sustainverb

To aid, comfort, or relieve; to vindicate.

‘His sons, who seek the tyrant to sustain.’;

Retainverb

allow to remain in a place or position;

‘We cannot continue several servants any longer’; ‘She retains a lawyer’; ‘The family's fortune waned and they could not keep their household staff’; ‘Our grant has run out and we cannot keep you on’; ‘We kept the work going as long as we could’;

Sustainverb

To endure without failing or yielding; to bear up under; as, to sustain defeat and disappointment.

Retainverb

secure and keep for possible future use or application;

‘The landlord retained the security deposit’; ‘I reserve the right to disagree’;

Sustainverb

To suffer; to bear; to undergo.

‘Shall Turnus, then, such endless toil sustain?’; ‘You shall sustain more new disgraces.’;

Retainverb

keep in one's mind;

‘I cannot retain so much information’;

Sustainverb

To allow the prosecution of; to admit as valid; to sanction; to continue; not to dismiss or abate; as, the court sustained the action or suit.

Sustainverb

To prove; to establish by evidence; to corroborate or confirm; to be conclusive of; as, to sustain a charge, an accusation, or a proposition.

Sustainnoun

One who, or that which, upholds or sustains; a sustainer.

‘I waked again, for my sustain was the Lord.’;

Sustainverb

lengthen or extend in duration or space;

‘We sustained the diplomatic negociations as long as possible’; ‘prolong the treatment of the patient’; ‘keep up the good work’;

Sustainverb

undergo (as of injuries and illnesses);

‘She suffered a fracture in the accident’; ‘He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars’; ‘She got a bruise on her leg’; ‘He got his arm broken in the scuffle’;

Sustainverb

provide with nourishment;

‘We sustained ourselves on bread and water’; ‘This kind of food is not nourishing for young children’;

Sustainverb

supply with necessities and support;

‘She alone sustained her family’; ‘The money will sustain our good cause’; ‘There's little to earn and many to keep’;

Sustainverb

be the physical support of; carry the weight of;

‘The beam holds up the roof’; ‘He supported me with one hand while I balanced on the beam’; ‘What's holding that mirror?’;

Sustainverb

admit as valid;

‘The court sustained the motion’;

Sustainverb

establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts;

‘his story confirmed my doubts’; ‘The evidence supports the defendant’;

Sustainverb

strengthen or support physically or mentally

‘this thought had sustained him throughout the years’;

Sustainverb

bear (the weight of an object) without breaking or falling

‘his health will no longer enable him to sustain the heavy burdens of office’; ‘he sagged against her so that she could barely sustain his weight’;

Sustainverb

undergo or suffer (something unpleasant, especially an injury)

‘he sustained severe head injuries’;

Sustainverb

cause to continue for an extended period or without interruption

‘he cannot sustain a normal conversation’;

Sustainverb

(of a performer) represent (a part or character) convincingly

‘he sustained the role of Creon with burly resilience’;

Sustainverb

uphold, affirm, or confirm the justice or validity of

‘the allegations of discrimination were sustained’;

Sustainnoun

an effect or facility on a keyboard or electronic instrument whereby a note can be sustained after the key is released.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons