VS.

Resilence vs. Resilience

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Resilenceverb

(transitive) To subject to gene silencing again.

Resiliencenoun

The mental ability to recover quickly from depression, illness or misfortune.

Resiliencenoun

The physical property of material that can resume its shape after being stretched or deformed; elasticity.

Resiliencenoun

The positive ability of a system or company to adapt itself to the consequences of a catastrophic failure caused by power outage, a fire, a bomb or similar (particularly IT systems, archives).

Resiliencenoun

The act of springing back, rebounding, or resiling; as, the resilience of a ball or of sound.

Resiliencenoun

The power or inherent property of returning to the form from which a substance is bent, stretched, compressed, or twisted; elasticity[1]; springiness; - of objects and substances.

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Resiliencenoun

The power or ability to recover quickly from a setback, depression, illness, overwork or other adversity; buoyancy; elasticity[2]; - of people.

Resiliencenoun

The mechanical work required to strain an elastic body, as a deflected beam, stretched spring, etc., to the elastic limit; also, the work performed by the body in recovering from such strain.

Resiliencenoun

the physical property of a material that can return to its original shape or position after deformation that does not exceed its elastic limit

Resiliencenoun

an occurrence of rebounding or springing back

Resiliencenoun

the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness

‘the often remarkable resilience of so many British institutions’;

Resiliencenoun

the ability of a substance or object to spring back into shape; elasticity

‘nylon is excellent in wearability, abrasion resistance and resilience’;

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