VS.

Reclaim vs. Wild

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Reclaimverb

(transitive) To return land to a suitable condition for use.

Wildadjective

Untamed; not domesticated; specifically, in an unbroken line of undomesticated animals (as opposed to feral, referring to undomesticated animals whose ancestors were domesticated).

‘Przewalski's horses are the only remaining wild horses.’;

Reclaimverb

(transitive) To obtain useful products from waste; to recycle.

Wildadjective

From or relating to wild creatures.

‘wild honey’;

Reclaimverb

(transitive) To claim something back; to repossess.

Wildadjective

Unrestrained or uninhibited.

‘I was filled with wild rage when I discovered the infidelity, and punched a hole in the wall.’;

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Reclaimverb

To return someone to a proper course of action, or correct an error; to reform.

Wildadjective

Raucous, unruly, or licentious.

‘The fraternity was infamous for its wild parties, which frequently resulted in police involvement.’;

Reclaimverb

To tame or domesticate a wild animal.

Wildadjective

Visibly and overtly anxious; frantic.

‘Her mother was wild with fear when she didn't return home after the party.’;

Reclaimverb

To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

Wildadjective

Disheveled, tangled, or untidy.

‘After a week on the trail without a mirror, my hair was wild and dirty.’;

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Reclaimverb

To cry out in opposition or contradiction; to exclaim against anything; to contradict; to take exceptions.

Wildadjective

Enthusiastic.

‘I'm not wild about the idea of a two day car trip with my nephews, but it's my only option.’;

Reclaimverb

To draw back; to give way.

Wildadjective

Inaccurate.

‘The novice archer fired a wild shot and hit her opponent's target.’;

Reclaimverb

To appeal from the Lord Ordinary to the inner house of the Court of Session.

Wildadjective

Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered.

‘a wild roadstead’;

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Reclaimnoun

The calling back of a hawk.

Wildadjective

(nautical) Hard to steer; said of a vessel.

Reclaimnoun

(obsolete) The bringing back or recalling of a person; the fetching of someone back.

Wildadjective

Not capable of being represented as a finite closed polygonal chain.

Reclaimnoun

An effort to take something back, to reclaim something.

Wildadjective

(slang) Amazing, awesome, unbelievable.

‘Did you hear? Pat won the lottery! - Wow, that's wild!’;

Reclaimverb

To claim back; to demand the return of as a right; to attempt to recover possession of.

‘A tract of land [Holland] snatched from an element perpetually reclaiming its prior occupancy.’;

Wildadjective

Able to stand in for others, e.g. a card in games, or a text character in computer pattern matching.

‘In this card game, aces are wild: they can take the place of any other card.’;

Reclaimverb

To call back, as a hawk to the wrist in falconry, by a certain customary call.

Wildadverb

Inaccurately; not on target.

‘The javelin flew wild and struck a spectator, to the horror of all observing.’;

Reclaimverb

To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

‘The headstrong horses hurried Octavius . . . along, and were deaf to his reclaiming them.’;

Wildnoun

The undomesticated state of a wild animal

‘After mending the lion's leg, we returned him to the wild.’;

Reclaimverb

To reduce from a wild to a tamed state; to bring under discipline; - said especially of birds trained for the chase, but also of other animals.

Wildnoun

a wilderness

Reclaimverb

Hence: To reduce to a desired state by discipline, labor, cultivation, or the like; to rescue from being wild, desert, waste, submerged, or the like; as, to reclaim wild land, overflowed land, etc.

Wildverb

To commit random acts of assault, robbery, and rape in an urban setting, especially as a gang.

Reclaimverb

To call back to rectitude from moral wandering or transgression; to draw back to correct deportment or course of life; to reform.

‘It is the intention of Providence, in all the various expressions of his goodness, to reclaim mankind.’;

Wildadjective

Living in a state of nature; inhabiting natural haunts, as the forest or open field; not familiar with, or not easily approached by, man; not tamed or domesticated; as, a wild boar; a wild ox; a wild cat.

‘Winter's not gone yet, if the wild geese fly that way.’;

Reclaimverb

To correct; to reform; - said of things.

‘Your error, in time reclaimed, will be venial.’;

Wildadjective

Growing or produced without culture; growing or prepared without the aid and care of man; native; not cultivated; brought forth by unassisted nature or by animals not domesticated; as, wild parsnip, wild camomile, wild strawberry, wild honey.

‘The woods and desert caves,With wild thyme and gadding vine o'ergrown.’;

Reclaimverb

To exclaim against; to gainsay.

Wildadjective

Desert; not inhabited or cultivated; as, wild land.

Reclaimverb

To cry out in opposition or contradiction; to exclaim against anything; to contradict; to take exceptions.

‘Scripture reclaims, and the whole Catholic church reclaims, and Christian ears would not hear it.’; ‘At a later period Grote reclaimed strongly against Mill's setting Whately above Hamilton.’;

Wildadjective

Savage; uncivilized; not refined by culture; ferocious; rude; as, wild natives of Africa or America.

Reclaimverb

To bring anyone back from evil courses; to reform.

‘They, hardened more by what might most reclaim,Grieving to see his glory, . . . took envy.’;

Wildadjective

Not submitted to restraint, training, or regulation; turbulent; tempestuous; violent; ungoverned; licentious; inordinate; disorderly; irregular; fanciful; imaginary; visionary; crazy.

‘What are theseSo withered and so wild in their attire ?’; ‘With mountains, as with weapons, armed; which makesWild work in heaven.’; ‘The wild winds howl.’; ‘Search then the ruling passion, there, aloneThe wild are constant, and the cunning known.’;

Reclaimverb

To draw back; to give way.

Wildadjective

Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered; as, a wild roadstead.

Reclaimnoun

The act of reclaiming, or the state of being reclaimed; reclamation; recovery.

Wildadjective

Indicating strong emotion, intense excitement, or ewilderment; as, a wild look.

Reclaimverb

claim back

Wildadjective

Hard to steer; - said of a vessel.

Reclaimverb

of materials from waste products

Wildnoun

An uninhabited and uncultivated tract or region; a forest or desert; a wilderness; a waste; as, the wilds of America; the wilds of Africa.

‘then Libya first, of all her moisture drained,Became a barren waste, a wild of sand.’;

Reclaimverb

bring, lead, or force to abandon a wrong or evil course of life, conduct, and adopt a right one;

‘The Church reformed me’; ‘reform your conduct’;

Wildadverb

Wildly; as, to talk wild.

Reclaimverb

make useful again; transform from a useless or uncultivated state;

‘The people reclaimed the marshes’;

Wildnoun

a wild primitive state untouched by civilization;

‘he lived in the wild’;

Reclaimverb

overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable;

‘He tames lions for the circus’; ‘reclaim falcons’;

Wildnoun

a wild and uninhabited area

Wildadjective

marked by extreme lack of restraint or control;

‘wild ideas’; ‘wild talk’; ‘wild originality’; ‘wild parties’;

Wildadjective

in a natural state; not tamed or domesticated or cultivated;

‘wild geese’; ‘edible wild plants’;

Wildadjective

in a state of extreme emotion;

‘wild with anger’; ‘wild with grief’;

Wildadjective

deviating widely from an intended course;

‘a wild bullet’; ‘a wild pitch’;

Wildadjective

(of colors or sounds) intensely vivid or loud;

‘a violent clash of colors’; ‘her dress was a violent red’; ‘a violent noise’; ‘wild colors’; ‘wild shouts’;

Wildadjective

not subjected to control or restraint;

‘a piano played with a wild exuberance’;

Wildadjective

talking or behaving irrationally;

‘a raving lunatic’;

Wildadjective

produced without being planted or without human labor;

‘wild strawberries’;

Wildadjective

located in a dismal or remote area; desolate;

‘a desert island’; ‘a godforsaken wilderness crossroads’; ‘a wild stretch of land’; ‘waste places’;

Wildadjective

without civilizing influences;

‘barbarian invaders’; ‘barbaric practices’; ‘a savage people’; ‘fighting is crude and uncivilized especially if the weapons are efficient’; ‘wild tribes’;

Wildadjective

(of the elements) as if showing violent anger;

‘angry clouds on the horizon’; ‘furious winds’; ‘the raging sea’;

Wildadverb

in an uncontrolled and rampant manner;

‘weeds grew rampantly around here’;

Wildadverb

in a wild or undomesticated manner;

‘growing wild’; ‘roaming wild’;

Wildadjective

(of an animal or plant) living or growing in the natural environment; not domesticated or cultivated

‘wild strawberries’; ‘a herd of wild goats’;

Wildadjective

produced from wild animals or plants without cultivation

‘wild honey’;

Wildadjective

(of a place or region) uninhabited, uncultivated, or inhospitable

‘the wild coastline of Cape Wrath’; ‘an expanse of wild moorland’;

Wildadjective

(of sea or the weather) rough and stormy

‘a wild, bitterly cold night’;

Wildadjective

(of people) not civilized; primitive

‘the wild tribes from the north’;

Wildadjective

(of a look, appearance, etc.) indicating distraction or strong emotion

‘her wild eyes were darting back and forth’;

Wildadjective

lacking discipline or restraint

‘wild parties were never her scene’;

Wildadjective

very enthusiastic or excited

‘I'm not wild about the music’;

Wildadjective

very angry.

Wildadjective

not based on sound reasoning or probability

‘a wild guess’; ‘wild rumours were circulating’; ‘performing in Hollywood was beyond my wildest dreams’; ‘who, even in their wildest dreams, could have anticipated such a victory?’;

Wildadjective

(of a playing card) deemed to have any value, suit, colour, or other property in a game at the discretion of the player holding it.

Wildnoun

a natural state or uncultivated or uninhabited region

‘kiwis are virtually extinct in the wild’;

Wildnoun

a remote uninhabited or sparsely inhabited area

‘he spent a year in the wilds of Canada’;

Wildverb

treat (a person or animal) harshly, so that they become untrusting or nervous

‘let your pigeon fly for a while: we don't want to wild him’;

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